Skip to main content

Full text of "A key to the classical pronunciation of Greek, Latin, and Scripture proper names:"

See other formats


Google 



This is a digital copy of a book that was preserved for generations on library shelves before it was carefully scanned by Google as part of a project 

to make the world's books discoverable online. 

It has survived long enough for the copyright to expire and the book to enter the public domain. A public domain book is one that was never subject 

to copyright or whose legal copyright term has expired. Whether a book is in the public domain may vary country to country. Public domain books 

are our gateways to the past, representing a wealth of history, culture and knowledge that's often difficult to discover. 

Marks, notations and other maiginalia present in the original volume will appear in this file - a reminder of this book's long journey from the 

publisher to a library and finally to you. 

Usage guidelines 

Google is proud to partner with libraries to digitize public domain materials and make them widely accessible. Public domain books belong to the 
public and we are merely their custodians. Nevertheless, this work is expensive, so in order to keep providing tliis resource, we liave taken steps to 
prevent abuse by commercial parties, including placing technical restrictions on automated querying. 
We also ask that you: 

+ Make non-commercial use of the files We designed Google Book Search for use by individuals, and we request that you use these files for 
personal, non-commercial purposes. 

+ Refrain fivm automated querying Do not send automated queries of any sort to Google's system: If you are conducting research on machine 
translation, optical character recognition or other areas where access to a large amount of text is helpful, please contact us. We encourage the 
use of public domain materials for these purposes and may be able to help. 

+ Maintain attributionTht GoogXt "watermark" you see on each file is essential for in forming people about this project and helping them find 
additional materials through Google Book Search. Please do not remove it. 

+ Keep it legal Whatever your use, remember that you are responsible for ensuring that what you are doing is legal. Do not assume that just 
because we believe a book is in the public domain for users in the United States, that the work is also in the public domain for users in other 
countries. Whether a book is still in copyright varies from country to country, and we can't offer guidance on whether any specific use of 
any specific book is allowed. Please do not assume that a book's appearance in Google Book Search means it can be used in any manner 
anywhere in the world. Copyright infringement liabili^ can be quite severe. 

About Google Book Search 

Google's mission is to organize the world's information and to make it universally accessible and useful. Google Book Search helps readers 
discover the world's books while helping authors and publishers reach new audiences. You can search through the full text of this book on the web 

at |http: //books .google .com/I 




''^^RA^\'^ 



n„. 




Bj( 'X'/J /i,//-rr) 



' i J-: . 1 ru .!■: .H --y ' A' f. " r f y / n 



t/^iA^u^*^ a f^ 



%yiy'w 



A KEY 



TO THE 

CLASSICAL PRONUNCIATION 

OF 

Creek, Latin^ and Scripture Proper Jfames; 

IN WHICH 

TUE WORDS ARE ACCENTED AND DIVIDED INTO SYLLABLES 

EXACTLY AS THEY OUGHT TO BE PBONOUNCED, 
ACCORDING TO RULES DItAWN FROM ANALOGY AMD THE BEST USAGE. 

TO WHICH ARE ADDED, 

TERMINATIONAL VOCABULARIES 

OF 

HEBREW, GREEK, AND LAflN PROPER NAMES^ 

IN WHICH 

THE WORDS ARE ARRANGED ACCORDING TO THEIR FINAL SYLLABLES, 

AND CLASSED ACCOUDINC TO THEIR ACCENTS; 

Byjohich the general Analogy qf Pronunciation may he teen at one view, and 
the Accentuation qf each Word mare easily remembered* 

CONCLUDING WITH 

Observations on the Greek and Lectin Accent and Quantity ; 

WITH 

SOME PROBABLE CONJECTURES ON THE METHOD OF FREEING THEM 

FROM THE OBSCURITY AND CONFUSION IN WHICH THEY ARE 

INVOLVED^ BOTH BY TH^^ ANCIENTS ANP MODERNS. 

Si quid notdsti rectiua ittis , , 

Candidas imperti : si non his utere mecunu Unr, , ' 

The THIRD EDITION, with large Additions. Price 78, Boards. 

By JOHN WALKER, 

AUTHOR OF THE CRIJJCAL PRONOUNCING DICTIONARY, ScC. 



LONDON, 

PRINTED BY J. M'CREERY, 
FOR J. JOHNSON, IN ST, PAUL*S CHURCH-YARD, T. CADELL AND W. 
DAVIES, IN THE STRAND, J. WALKER, NO. 46, WILKIEAND ROBIN- 
SON, AND G. ROBINSON, NO. 67, IN PATERNOSTER-ROW,. 

1807. 



no 'J 



« - 






PREFACE. 



The Critical Pronouncing Dictionary of the English 
Language naturally suggested an idea of the presewt 
work. Proper names from the Greek and Latin form^ 
50 considerable a part of every cultivated living lan*^ 
guage, that a Dictionary seems to be imperfect with-^ 
out them. Polite scholars, indeed, are seldom at a 
loss for the pronunciation of virords they so frequently, 
meet v\rith Jn the learned languages; but there ar<5 
great numbers of respectable English scholars, who, 
having only a tincture of classical learning, are 
much at a loss for a knowledge of this part of it. It 
is not only the learned professions that require this 
knowledge, but almost every one above the merely 
mechanical. The professors of painting^ statuary, 
and music, and those who admire their works; 
readers of history, politics, poetry; all who con- 
verse on subjects ever so little above the vulgar have 
so frequent occasion to pronounce these proper 
names, that whatever tends to render this pronun- 
ciation easy must necessarily be acceptable to the 
Public. 

The proper names in Scripture have still a higher 
claim to our attention. That every thing contained 
in that precious repository of divine truth should be 

a2 



IT 



PREFACE. 



rendered as easy as possible to the reader, cannot be 
doubted: and the very frequent occasions of pror 
Bouncing Scripture' proper names, in a country 
where reading the Scripture makes part of the reli- 
gious worship, seem to demand some work on this 
subject more perfect than any we havb hitherto 
seen. 

I' could have wished it had been undertaken by a 
person of more learning and leisure than myself; but 
we often wait in vain for works of this kind, from 
those learned bodies which ought to produce them, 
and at last are obliged, for the best we can get, to 
the labours of some necessitous individual. Being 
long engaged in the instruction of youth, I felt the 
want of a work of this kind, and have supplied it in 
the best manner I am able. - If I have been happy 
enough to be useful, or only so far useful as to in- 
duce some abler hand to undertake the subject, — 
I shall think my labour amply rewarded. I shall still 
<5onsole myself with reflecting, that he who has pro- 
duced a prior work, however inferior to those that 
succeed it, is under a very different predicament 
from him who produces an after-work, inferior to 
those that have gone before. 



ADVERTisiMENT 



to 



.. .si 



THE SECOJ^D EDItlOX 



The iavourabie reception of the first edition of 
this work has induced me to attempt to make it still 
more worthy of the acceptance of the Public, by the 
addition of several critical observations, and parti- 
cularly by two Terminational Vocabtdaries, of Greek 
and Latin, and Scripture, Proper Names. That so 
much labour should be bestowed Upon an inverted 
arrangement of these words, when they had already 
been given in their common alphabetical order, may 
be matter of wonder to many persons, who will na- 
turally inquire into the utility of such an arrange- 
ment. To these it may be answered, that the words 
of all languages seem more related to each other by 
their terminations than by their beginnings; that 
the Greek and Latin languages seem more particu- 
laf ly to be thus related ; and classing them accord- 
ing to their endings seemed to exhibit a new view 
of these languages, both curious and useful : for as 

a 3 



Tl 



ADVERTISEMENT- 



their accent and quantity depend so much on their 
termination^ such an arrangement appeared to give 
an easier and more comprehensive idea of their pro- 
nunciation than the common classification by their 
initial syllables. This end was so desirable as to in- 
duce me to spare no pains, however dry and dis- 
gusting, to promote it; and if the method I have 
taken has failed, my labour will not be entirely lost 
if it convinces future prOsodists that it is not worthy 
of their attention. 



CONTENTS OF THE INTRODUCTION. 



.1 



r. 



PAGB 

HE pronunciation of Greek and Latin not so difficult 
as that of our own language . . uc 

The ancient pronunciation of Greek and Latin, a subject 
of great controversy among the learned .... ibid. 

The English, however faulty in their pronunciation of 
Greek and Latin, pronounce them like other European 
nations, dccording to the analogy of their oxsm language x 

Sufficient vestiges remain to prove that the foreign pronun^ 
ciation of the Greek and Latin letters is nearer to the 
ancient than the English — (Note) ibicL 

The English pronunciation of Greek and Latin injurious 
to quantity '. . . xi 

No student reason for altering the present pronunciation on 
these accounts jciii 

Rule for accenting Latin words . . . , , . . . xiv 

Rule for accenting Greek proper names • mr 

Probable conjecture tmy the termination fia and tic in Greek 
appellatives have not the same sound as in Latin — (Note) m 

Importance of settling the English quantity with which we 
pronounce Greek and Latin proper names, andparticur 
larly that of the unaccented syllables xz 



\ 



INTRODUCTION. 



1 HE pi-ohuntiatioii of the learned languages is much more ea-t 
sily acquired than that oi our own. Whatever might have been 
the variety of the different dialects among the Greeks^ and the 
different province^ of the Romans^ their languages novt being 
dead, are generally pronounced according to the respective 
analogies of. the several languages of Europe^ where those lan- 
gus^es are cultivated^ without partaking of those anomalies to 
which the living languages are liable. 

Whether one general uniform pronunciation of the ancient 
lai^ages be an object of sufficient importance to induce the 
learned to depart from the analogy of their own language^ and 
to study the ancient Latin and Greek pronunciation^ as they do 
the etymoldgy^ syntax^ and prosqdy of those languages, is a 
question not very easy to be decided. The question becomes 
still more difficult when we consider the uncertainty we are in 
respecting the ancient pronunciation of the Greeks and Romans^ 
and how ihuch the learned are divided among themselves about 
it."*^ Till these points are settled, the English may well be al- 



* Middleton coatends that the initial c before e and i eught to be pronounced 
as the Italians now pronounce it ; and that Cicero is neither Siser^, as the Frendi 
and English pronouqce it; nor KikerOf as Dr. Bentley asserts ; but Tshitther^^ 
as the Italians pronounce it at this day. This pronunciation, however, is d^ 
rided by Lipsius, who affirms that the c among, the Romans had always the sound 
of/ k, lipsius says too, that of all the European nations, the Briti^ alone pro- 
nounce the i properly ; but Middkton asserts, that of all nations they pronounct 
it the worst. . Middleton De Ldst, Liters Prowm Dissert 

lipsius, speaking of the different pronunciation ef the letter G in different 
countries^ says: 

Nos hodie (dc literfi G loquente) cjuam peccamus ? Italorum enim pleriqne 
ut Z exprimunt, GaUi et Belgiae ut J consonantem^ Itaque illorum est Lezere^ 
Fuzere; nostrum^ Leiere, Fuiere (Lejercy Fi^ere). Omnia imperite, inepte. 
Oennanos saltern audite^ quorum sonns hie germanus, Legercy Tegert ; ut in 
Lego^ TegOy nee unquam variant: at nos ante /, E^M, F, semper dicunusque 
Jemmmny JahUoSy Ji^wanif Jyrum; pro istis, Gemmam, GithUoa, Giitgnmiu 
Gynwv Mutemus aut vapulemus.*--Z<t|>sti»* De Red. Pron, Litig, Lnt. page 71. 

Hinc 



X fNTKODUCTION. 

lowed to follow their own pronunciation of Greek and Latin, as 
well as other nations, eyen though it should be confessed that it 
seems to depart more from what we can gather of the ancient 
pronunciation, than either the Italian, French, or German.* 
For why the English should pay a compliment to the learned 

Hinc factum est ut tanta in prononciando varietas extiteret iit pauci inter M 
in literamm sonis consentiant. Quod quidem minim non esset, si indocti tan- 
^tiim a doctis in eo, ac non ipsi etiam alioqui eruditi inter se magna contentione 
dissiderent. — Adolp, Meker, De Lin, Grac, vet, TPronun. cap. ii. page 15. 

* Monsieur Launcelot, the leame^d author of the Port-Royal Greek Gram- 
mar, in order to convey the sound of the long Greek Towel n, tells us, it is a 
•ound between the e and the a, and that Enstathios, who lived towards the 
close of the twelfth century, says, that $ii, /S?, is a sound made in imitatioa 
of the bleating of a sheep -, and quotes to this purpose this verse of an ancient 
, writer called Cratinus : 

Is fatuus perinde ac ovis, b^, be, dicens, incedit. 
He, like a silly sheep, goes crying baa, 

Caninius has remarked the same, Hellen, p. 26. E longnm, cuJiM sonus ia 
•vium. balatu sentitur, ut Cratinus et Varro tradiderunt. The sound of the e 
long may be perceived in the bleating of sheep, as Cratinus and Varro have 
handed down to us. 

Eustathius likewise remarks upon the 499 ▼. of Hiad I. that the word 

BXH io^*' « '»'*'? K\i^vfytg ^^df /Juif^ntiKws Kara, t»c vraXaiitg ; $n i^J^i 
fjUfAvo'iv v^9^&ron <}>c0v?;. K^&riwg, BXo^ est Clepsydrae sonus, ex imitatione 
secundum veteres; et ^ imitatnr vocum ovium. BlopSy according to 
the ancients, is a sound in imitation of the Clepsydrae, as baa is expressive of 
tiie voice of sheep. It were to be wished that the sound Df every Greek 
vowel had been conveyed to us by as faitliful a testimony as the nra; we 
should certainly have had a better idea of that harmony for which the Greek 
language was so fomous, aqd in which respect Quintilian candidly yields it the 
preference to the Latin. 

Aristophanes has lianded down to iis the pronunciation of the Greek diphthong 
«v ov by making it expressive of the barking of a dog. lliis pronunciation is 
exactly like that preserved by nurses and children among us to this day in bow 
wow. This is the sonnd of the same letters in the Latin tongue; not only in 
proper names derived from Greek, but in every other word where this 
diphthong occurs^ Most nations in Europe, perhaps all but the Engh'sh, pro- 
nounce^ottdio and laudo, as if vmtten owdio and lowdo; the dipfatiiong sounding 
like on in loud. Agreeably to this rule, it is presumed tiiat we formerly pro« 
noonced the apostle Paul nearer the original than at present. In Henry the 
Eighth's time it was written St. Poulfa, and sermons were preadied at Pouk^t 

Cton, 



INTKODTJCTIOK. » 

' languages^ which is not done by any other tialioii in Europe, it 
is not easy to conceive ; and as the coHoquial communication of 
learned individuals of different nations so seldom happens, and 
is an object of so small importance when it does happen, it is not 
much to be regretted that when they meet they are scarcely intel* 
ligible to each- other.* 

But the English are accused not only of departing from the 
genuine sound of the Greek and Latin vowels, but of violating 
the quantity of these languages more than the people of any 
other nation in Europe. The author of the Essay npon the 
Harmony of Language gives us a detail of the particulars bj 
which this accusation is proved : and this is so true a picture^f 
the English pronunciation of Latin, that I shall quote it at length, 
gs it may be of use. to those who are obliged to learn this lan- 
guage without the aid of a teacher. 

Cro$8, The vulgar, generaHy the last to alter, either for the better or worse, 
still have a jingliog proverb with this pronunciatioD, when they say A$ old m 

The sound of the letter u is no less sincerely preserved in Flautus, in IMeaaedii 
page 62% edit. Lambin. in making use Of it to imitate the cry of an oWt- ■ 

<^ 'MEN. Egon' dedi? PEN. Tu, Tu, istic, inquam, vin* afferri noctnam, 
^ Quas tu, tu, usqiie dicat tibi? nam nos jam nos defessi sumns.**' 

^^ It appears here," says Mr. Forster, in his defence of the Greek aeeeniB, 
page 129, ^* that an owl's cry was tu, tu, to a Roman ear, as it is too, too, to an ' 
English.'* Lambin, who was a Frenchman, observes on the passage, ** Alladit 
^ ad noctusB.voccm sen cantum, fu, tu, seu tou, tou," He here alludes to Hyt 
voice or noise of an owL It may be farther observed, that the English have 
totally departed from thi9>^ound of the « in their own language, as weU as la 
their pronunciation of Latii]^, 

* Erasmus se adfuisscjfo^n copuncmorat cum. die qnodam solenni conploret 
principum Icgati ad H^aximilianum Imperatoj^ salutandi caus& advenissent ; 
8ingnIosque Galium, Germanum, Danum, Scotum, &c. orationem Latinam, ita 
barbare ac vaste propunciasse, ut Italis quibusdam, nihil nisi risum moverint, 
qui eos non Latine sed sul qnenique4iiugii&, locutos jurskssent. — Middkton, De 
tmt. Lit, Prontm. 

The love of the marvellous prevails over troth: audi question if 4i)e greatest 
divei^ity in the pronunciation 'of Latin exceeds that of English at t^bcapital 
and in some of the counties of Scotland, and yet the inhabitants of-both h|iva 
ao great difficulty in uhdeiBtauding each other. ! . . / 



»• 



Xtt iNTRODtJCtlON. 



€€ 



'' The falsification of the harmony by English sdiolars hi 

their pronunciation of Latin, with regard to essential points, 

'' arises* from two causes only : first, from a total inattention to 

^ th^ length of vowel sounds, making them long or short 

'^ merely as chance directs ; and secondly, from sounding 

'* double consonants as only one letter. The remedy of thisK 

*' last fault is obvious. With regard to the first, we have already 

^' observed, Aat each of our vowels hath its general long sound, 

'' and its general short sound tdally different^ Thus the s&ort 

'^ sound of e lengthened is expressed by the letter a, ^nd the 

*^ short sound of i lengthened is expressed by the letter e : and 

^^ with all these anomalies usual in the application of vowel 

** characters to the vowel sounds of our own language, we pro- 

^' ceed to the application of vowel sounds to the vowel charac- 

^^ ters of the Latin. Thus in the first syllable of sidus and na- 

'^ men, which ought to be long ; and of miser and onus, which 

*' ought to be short ; we equally use the common long sound of ' 

" the Vowels; but in the oblique cases, sideris, nominis, miseri, 
^^ oneriSf &c«, we use quite another sound, and that a short one. 

" These strange anomalies are not in Common to us vnth our 

'' southern neighbours the French, Spaniards, a^d Italian^. 

'^ They pronounce sidus according to our orthography, seedus, 

** and in the oblique cases preserve the same long sound of the 

** «; nomen they pronounce as we do, and preserve in the oblique 

'^ cases the same long sound of the 0. The Italians also, in their 

^ own language, pronounce doubled consonants as distinctly as 

^* the two most discordant mktes of their alphabet. Whatever, 

'* therefoi^e, they may want of expressing the true harmony of 

** the Latin langiiagey they certainly avoid the most glaring and 

'^ absurd faults in our manner of pronouncing it. 

'^ It is a matter of curiosity to observe with what regularity 

'^ we use these solecisms in the pronunciation of Latin. When 

*^ the penultimate is accented, its vowel, if followed but by a 

** single consonant, is always long, as in Dr. Forster's examples. 

" When the antepenultimate is accented, its vowel is, without 

'< any regard to tlie requisite quafitity, pronoukiced short, as in 



INTKODUCTION. , rfli 

^ mir&bile, frigidus; except the vowel of the penultimate be 
*^ followed by a vowel, and then the vowel of the antepenulti*? 
'^ mate is with as little regard to true quantity pronounced long, 
'^ as in maneOy redeat, odium, imperium. Quantity is however 
'^ vitiated to make i short even in this case, as in oblivioy vinea, 
*f virium. The only difference we make in pronunciation be- 
** tween vinea and venia is, that to the vowel of the first syllable 
'' of the former, which ought to be long, we give a short sound ; 
'f to that of the latter, which ought to be short, we give the same 
** sound, but lengthened. U accented is always before a single 
^f consonant pronounced long, as in humerus, fugiens, Befori^ 
f* two consonants no vowel sound i? ever made long, except that 
'f of the diphthong au; so that whenever a doubled consonant 
*' occurs, the pre^ding syllable is short.* Unaccented vowela 
'' we treat with no more ceremony in Latin than in our own' Ian* 
f* guage." Essay upon the Harmony of Language, page £24, 
Printed for Robs.on, 1774. 

This, it must be owned, is 9 very just state of the case ; but 
though the Latin quantity is thus violated, it is uot, as this* writer 
observes in the first part of the quotation, merely as chance di" 
rects, but, as he afterwards observes, regularly, and he might 
have ^dded, according to the analogy of Epglish pronunciation^^ 
which, it may ]be observed, has a genius of its own ; and which, 
if not so well adapted to the pronunciation of Greek and Latin 
aid some other modem languages, has as fixed and settled rules fqr 
pronouncing them as any other. 

The learned oftd jngenious author next proceeds to show the 
advantages of pronouncing our vowels so as to express the Latin 
quantity. *^ We have reason to suppose,*- says he, ^* that our 
*' usual accentuation of Latin, however it may want of many ele- 
f' gancies ia the pronunciation of th§ Ai;gustan age, is yet suf- 
^ ficiently just to give with tolerable accuracy that part of the 

* This corrnption <^f thip true quantity is not, however, peculiar to the English ; 

fpr B^ complains in his country : Hinc enim fit nt in Gi-a^ca oratione vel ouIlum,| 

yel prorsus corruptam numerum intelUgas, dnm multae breves prodacuntur, 6t 

^ pntrftplorims longae cprripiuntur. Beza 4e QcnD« Pron. Gnecae IJo^ae,j^. 50. 



a«r iNtaoDUCTioN. 

^' general harmony of the language of which accent b die ef- 
'' ficient We have also pretty full information from the poets 
'^ what syllables ought to have a long^ and what a short quantity. 
** To preserve, then, in our pronunciation, the true harmony of 
'^ the language, we have only to take care to give the vowek a 
'' loi^ sound or a short sound, as the quantity may require; and^ 
'* when doubled consonants occur, to pronounce each distbactlyl** 
Ibid, page 228.* 

In answer to this plea for alteration, it may be observed, that 
if this mode of pronouncing Latin be that of foreign nations^ 
and were really so superior to our own, we certainly must per- 
ceive it in the pronunciation of foreigners, when we visit them, 
or they us : but I think I may appeal to the experience of every 
one who has had an opportunity of making tHI experiment, that 
so far from a superiority on the side of the foreign pronunciation, 
it seems much inferior to our own. I am aware of the power of 
habit, and of its being able, o?i mani/ occasions, to make the worse 
appear the better reason : but if the harmony of the Latin lan- 
guage depended so much on a preservation of the quantity as 
many pretend, this harmony would surely overcome the bias we^ 
have to our own pronunciation; especially if our ,own were 
really so destructive of harmony as it is said to be. Till, there- 
fore, we have a more accurate idea of the nature of quantity, 
and of tliat beauty and harmony of which it is said to be the ef- 



* By what this learned author has observed of our vicious pronunciation of 
the vowels, by the long and short sound of them, and from the instances he has 
given, he must mean that length and shortness which arises from extending and 
tontracting them> independently of the obstruction which two consonants are 
Apposed to occasion in forming the long quantity. Thus we are to pronounce 
Mlanus as if written and divided into Man-nua ; and Pamais as if written Patf* 
mL8y or as we always hear the word Pania (bread) ; for in this sound of Pannia 
there seems to be no necessity for pronouncing the two consonants distinctly or 
separately, which he seems to mean by distinctly, because the quantity is shown 
by the long sound of the vowel : but if by distinctly he means separately, that is, 
as if what is called in French the fchiva or mute e were to follow the first con* 
Mnant, this could not be done without adding a syllable to the word; and the 
word PcimiM would m that case certainly have three syllables, as if written 
Pon-eft-mis.— See ObivrtfaUm on tUGnik md Min Amnt and QuanHtif, sect, 
g4s ' 



INTEOBUCTIOW. W 

fiMnt in fte prominciation of Latin, we oo^t to preserve a 
pronvnciation which has naturally sprui^ up in our own soil, 
mid is pcHigenial to our native language. Besides, an alteration 
of this kind would be attended with so much dispute and uncer- 
l^junty as must make it h^ly impolitic to attempt it. 

The analogy, then, of our own language being the rule for 
proapuncing the learned lai^uages, we shall have little occasion 
for any other- directions for the pronunciation of the Greek and 
Latin proper names, than such as are given Tor the pronunciation 
of EngUsh words. The general rules are followed almost with* 
out exception. The first and most obvious powers of the letters 
are adopted, and there is scarcely any difficulty but in the position 
of the accent ; and this depends so much on the quantity of the 
vowels, that we need only inspect a dictionary to find the quau" 
tity of the penultimate vowel, and this determines the accent of 
^ the Latin words ; and it may be' added, of almost all Greek 
words likewise.* Now in our pronunciation of Latin words, 
whatever be the quantity of the first syllable in a word pf two 
syllables, we always place the accent on it: but in words of 
more syllables, if the penultimate be long, we place the accent 
on that ; and if short we accent the antepenultimate. . 

Ilie Rules of the Latin Accentuation are comprised in a clear 
and concise manner by Sanctius within four hexameter's : 

Accentom in se ipsit monosyUaba dictio ponit« 
Exacaitsedem dissyllabon omne'priorem. 
Ex tribus, extoltit primam penultima curta : 
- ExtolUt seipsam quando est penultima longa. 

These rul^s I have endeavoured to express in Ei^lish verse; 

Each monosyUable ha» stress of course ; 
Words of two syllables, the first enforce : 
A syllable that's long, and last but one, 
Must have the accent upon that or none : 
But if this syllable be short, Hie 8tres!% 
Must on the last but two its force express. 

The only difference that seems to obtain between the pronun* 
mtion of the Greek and Latin languages is, tliat in the Latin ti 

-— — ■- . . I ■■> . 

, • That if, in the gener^ pronunciation of Greek ; for, let tlie written accent 
be placed where it wiU, the qmntitativi accent, as it may be called; follow» tht 
fnylogy of tiie Latin. 



XVI INTRODtI€TION, 

and si, preceded by an accent, and followed by another voweT 
forming an improper diphthong, are pronounced as in Englisby. 
like sh or zhf ^natio, nation i persunsio, persua^on, &c. ; and 
that in the Greek, the same letters retain their piure sound, as 
ifiXctvThoif icyvwaha^ v^cSocTior, x. r. A. ^ This difference, how* 
ever, with very few exceptions, does not extend to prc^r 
names ; which, coming to us through, and being swingled with, 
the Latin, fall into the general rule. In the same manner, though 
in Greek it was an established maxim, that if the last syllable 

* '^ The Gree^ language/' says the learaed eritic, ^' was happy in not being 
^' understood by the Qoths, who would as certainly have cormpted the t ii| 
'^ alrUtf inlw, &c. into etla-la^ vxriwj &c. as they did the Latin iraoHa and 
'< doceo into moshio and do8he»,*** This, however, may be questioned ; for if in 
Latin words this impure sound of t takes place only in those words where the 
accent is on the precedii^g vowel, as in natio, facto, &c. ; bat not when the ac« 
cent follows the t, and is on the fo^owing vowel, as in satiettu, societas, &c. why 
should we suppose any other mode of pronunciation would have been adopted 
by the Goths in their pronouncing the Greek ? Now no rule of pronunciation it 
more uniform in the Greek language tlian that whith places an acute on the iota 
at the end of words, when this letter is succeeded by a long vowel ; and conse- 
quently if the accent be preserved upon the proper letter, it is impossible the 
preceding t and s should go into the sound of sh ; vefay, therefore, may we not 
* suppose that the very frequent accentuation of the penultimate t before a final 
yowel preserved the preceding t from going into the sound of sh, as it was a dif' 
ference of accentuation that occasioned this impure sound of t in the Latin lan^ 
guage? for though i at the end of words, when followed by a long vowel, or a 
vowel once long and afterwards contracted, had always the accent on it in 
Greek ; in Latin the accent was always on the preceding syllable in words of 
this termination: and hence seems to have arisen the corruption of # in the 
Gothic pronunciation of the Latin language. 

It is highly probable, that in Lucian's time the Greek r, when followed by .£ 
and another vowel, had not assumed tlie sound of c^ for the Sigma would not 
have failed to apcuse him of a usurpation of her powers, as he had done of her 
character : and if we havQ preserved the r pure in this situation when we pro- 
nounce Greek, it is, perhaps, rather to be placed to the preserving power of the 
acpented Hn so great a number of words, than any adherence to the ancient rales 
ef pronunciation ; which invariably affirm, that the consonants had but one sound ; 
unless we except the y before y, x, x> ?> ^ &ytk\o^, iytiv^A, iyx^»y 
*. T. X. where the y is sounded like v : but this, says Henry Stephens, is an errour 
of the copyists, who have a little extended the bottom of the v, and made a y of it ; 
for, says he, it is ridiculous to suppose that v was changed into y, and at the same 

t|m« 

• AinsForUi OB the l«t^ T. 



IMTBOI^UCTIOK* Xm 

was ]oiig> the accent could scarcely^be h^iiet than the p^ulti'- 
mate; yet in oivr pronunciation of Greek, and particularly of 
]^per names, &e Latin analogy of the accent b adopted: wt 
fiium^ the htft syllaUe is loi% in Demosthen^ Ari$tophane$^ 
Therammes, and Deiphobe, yet as the penultimate is short, the 
accent is placed on die antepenul^ate, exactly as if they were 
Latin.*. 

As these languages have been long dead; they admit of no 
new Tarieties of accent like the livii^ languages. The common 
accentuation of Gredc and Latin may be seen in Lexicons and 
Graduses ; wad where the ancients indulged a variety, and the 
modems ai^ divided in their opinions about the most classical 
accentuation of words, it would be highly improper, in a work 
intended for general use, to enter into, the thorny disputes pf the 
learned; and it may be truly said, in the rhyming adage. 

When Doctors disagree. 
Disciples then are free. 

This, however, has not been entirely neglected. Where diere 

I .1 ■■ . ' ■ ■ II. ■ ■ .. • ., ,1 , 

time that y should be pronounced like y. On the contnu^, Scaliger says, that 
where we find a v before these letters, as avKv^ei, it is an error of the copyists, 
who imagmed they better expressed the pronunciation by this letter^ whidi, as' 
Toasius observes, should seem to demand something particular and uncommon. 

It is reported of Scaliger, that when he was accosted by a Scotchman in Latin, 
he begged his pardon for not understanding him, as he had never learned the 
Scotch language. If this was the case with the pronunciation of a Scotchman,- 
^wliich is so near that of ^e Continent, what woul4 he have said to ^e f^ ^^ 
pronunciation of an. Englishman ? I take it, however, that this divenity is 
greatly exaggerated. 

* Tliis, however, was contrary to Hye general practice of iSbfi Romans ; for 
Victorinns in his Grammar says, GfnEco nomiiMy «t iisdem lUeria proferuntur, 
(lAtine versa) Gracoi uccentus hobebuntx nam cum dicimus Thyas, AiM9,acutunK^ 
liabebit posterior accentum -, et cum Themutioy CaUfyto, Theanoy ultimam cir^ 
cnmflecti videbimus, quod utrum^ue lAtinus sermo non patitur, niai admodum 
raro. ^ If Greek nomas turned into Latin are pronounced with the same letters, 
« they have the Greek accent: for when we say thygSy .Now, the latter syllable 
^ has the acute accent; and when we pronounce Themistioy Ctdypso, Theaw, 
** we see the last syllable is circumfiexed; neither of which Ir evef seen in I^ativ 
<* words^ or very rarely,**— fi^writt*. Forster. JR^2y^ page ^i. Notes 3«, bott 

b 



kvHi INTftODtTCtlOiTa 

hn$ heea iny ctmAdtrhila diversity of accenftttntian amofig our 
pro^odists, I Iiave cofisult^ fhe best autliorities, and have some- 
times venttired to decide: tiiou^y as Labbe ss^s^ ** Sed his da 
^' rebus, tit alas iitoltis, ihalo doctiorum judicium ^pe0tare^ 
" quaim meafii in medium proferre seintentiatn.''^ 

But tiie most important object of tiie pi'esent worl; is settUflf 
the English quantity y (see Rules 20, 21, 22) ^ith which ynfe 
prottduAce Grreek and Latm projif^r names, atid the sounds of 
ikoiHb of th^ consonatits. These at« points in a state of great un^ 
certainty; and ar^ to he settled, ndt so much foy a disep kiiow- 
ledge of the disad languages, as by a thorough acquaintance with 
ihe analogies and general usage of our own toi^e. These must, 
in die nature of things, enter largely into the pronunciation of a 
d^ad l^guag^ ; and it is froih ah attention to these diat the 
Author hopes he has given to die Public a woirk not entirely 
unworthy of their acceptance. 



R u L e; s 

1 .. . . ■ 

VOR 

. " * ..... 

PBONOUNCING THE VOWELS 

OF 

4 ' ' ' 

CREEK JJVD LJTIJr PROPER JfAMES. 



1. Hi VERY vowel witfa the accent od it at the end of a syUabk 
18 pronounced as in English, with its first long open sound: 
thus Co! to,* Philomel la, Ori' on, Pho' cion, Li/cifer, &c. have 
the accented vowels sounded exactly as in the £nglisb words 
jfaper, meftre, spi'der, no' hie, tvltor, 8tc. 

2. Every accented vowel qot ending a syllable, but followed 
by a consonant, has the short sound as in En^ish; thufr 
Mavllim, Penftheus, Pin' dams, Cofchis, Cut^tiiis, iu:. have 
the short sound of the accented vowels, as in man'ner, phn'ty, 
prin' ter, coF lar, cur^few, Sic. 

3. Every final i, though unaccented, has the long open 
sound: thus the final i forming the genitive case, as in Ma* 
gi^tri, or the plural number, ^ in D/cii, has the loi^ open ' 
pound, as in vifal ; and this sound we give to* this vowel , in: tins 
situation, because die Latin i final in genitives, plurals^ and pre- 
terperfect tenses of verb^ is always long ^' and consequently 

• * The prohunciatioii af Caio, Plat9f Clfpatra, &c. has been but lately 
adopted. Qv&ny and aU the old dramatic school, used to pronounce the a in 
•these^andsiniUar words like the a in father, Mr. Garrick, with great good 
sense, an well as good tasje, brought in the present pronunciatiop, and the pro- 
j^rie^ of itlias4taade it now nnivenal. 






SX BULES FOR PRONOUNCING 



« 



where the accented i is followed by t final^.both are pronounced 
ivith the loi^ diphthongal f> like the noun eye^ as AcMvi.^ 

4. Every unaccented i ending a syllable not final; as that in 
the second of uilcibiades, die HefTiici, &c. is pronounced like e, 
as if written Alcebiades, die Herneci, &c. So the last syllable 
but one of the Fabii, the Horatii, die Curiatii, &c. is pro- 
nounced as if written Fa-be-i, Ho-ra-^he^f Cu-re-a-ske'i ; and 
dierefore if the unaccented i and the diphthong a conclude a 
word, diey are both pronounced lik €, as HarpyiiE, Har^ 

5. The diphdiongs iB and a, ending a syllable with the ac- 
cent on it; are pronounced exacdy Uke the long English e, as 
Caesar J CEta, &c. as if written Cee^sar, E^ta, &c.; and like the 
short e. when followed by a consonant in the same syllable, as 
DadaluSf CEdipus, &c. pronounced as if written Dedddlus, 
JEiddipuSy 8cc. The yowels ei are generally pronounced like long 
a,*|-rr-For die vowels eu in final syllables, see the words Idabie* 
nem: and for the ou In the same syllables, see die word An- 
tinous, and similar words, in the Terminational Vocabulary. 

. ^. Y is, exacdy under the same predicament as i.- It is long 
when ending an accented syllable, as Ci/rus; or when ending an 
unaccented syllable if final, as ^'gy, ^^py, 8cc.: short when 
joined to a consonant in the same syllable, as Lycfvdm ; and 
sometimes long and sometimes short, when miding an initial syl- 



* This b tlie true, analogical proniinciation of this letter \vfaen ending an ac? 
ceoted syllable ; bnt a most dtsgracefbl affectation of foreign pronunciation has ex^ 
dlanged this fall di^tiiongid sound for the meagre, squeezed wonapA of the Freneli 
and Italian i, not only in almost every word depvedfrom those languages, but in 
^ many which are purely Latin, as FaiuiiiMj Messdiina, &C. Nay, words from the 
iSaxonhare been equally perverted, and we hear the t in EVrida, Edwuta, &c. 
turned into Effreeduy Eaweenoi &;c. It is true this is the sound the Romans 
nve to their i ; but the speakers here' alluded to are perfectly innocent of this^ 
and do not pronounce it in this manner for its antiquity, but its novelty. 

t See EVkH^ Hygeia,kt. m the Terminational Vocabulary of Greek and 
Latin pQOpet Names, 

5' 



GREEK AND LATIN PROPER NAMES. XXI 

■ > 

lable not under the accent^ as Ly-cur^gus, pronounced with the 
fifst syllable like lie, b, falsehood; ^ndl^simachus with the first 
syllable like' the first of legion ; or nearly as if divided into I^ 
%w!a-<husj &€. See Principles of English Pronunciation pre- 
fiiced to the Critical Pronouncing Dictionary ^ No. 117, 118, &c. 

and 1S5, 186, 187. 

7« A, endmg an unaccented syllable, has the same obscure 
sound as in the same situation in English words ; but it is a 
sound bordering on the Italian a, or the a in fa-ther, as Dia'na, 
where the difference between the accented and unaccented a 
18 palpable. See Principles of English Pronunciation pre* 
lixed to the Critical Pronouncing Dictionary, No. 92, and the $ 
letter A. 

8. £ final, either with or without the preceding consonant, 
always forms a distinct syllable, as Penelope^ Hippocrehe, Evoe, 
Ampkitrit(^ &c. When any Greek or Latin word is anglicised 
into tills termination, by cutting off a syllable of the ordinal, it 
becomes then an English word, and is pronounced acc6r£ng 
to our own analog : thus AcidaliuSy altered to Acidale, has the 
final, e sunk, and is a word of three syllables only : Proserpine, 
from Proserpina, undergoes the siame alteration. Thebes and 
Athens, derived from the Grieek ©uffn and A^nm, and the Latin 
Theba ^nd Athena, are perfectly anglicised; the former into a 
inonosyllable, and the latter into a dissyllable : and the Greek 
K^rq and the Latin Cfeta have both suiik into the English 
monosyllable Crete: Hecate likewise pronounced in three sylla- 
bles when Latin, and in the same nunjber in the Greek word 
inttTfi, in English is universally contracted into two,' by 
sinking the final e. •Shakespeare seems to have begun as he 
has now confirmed this pronunciation by so adapting the word 
in Macbeth: r . . , v 

" Why how now, Hecat* ? you look angerly."— ^>lf*.' IV, 
Perhaps this was no more that a poetical licence to him ; but 
die actors have adopted it in the songs in this tragedy : 

^ He-cate, U^-mU, ^ome away " . ■ ■ ■ ■ 



^tii BUIiES TO'SL rRONo'UNClNO 

And Ae play-going world, who form no small portion of what 
18 called the better sort of people, have followed the actcH^ in 
(bk word : and Ae rest of the world have foflowed them. 

The ttoman magistrate, named JSdilis, is anglicised by pro-- 
liomidng it iii two syllables, ^dik. The capital of Sicily, 
Syracuse, of four syllables, is made three in the English Syr^a* 
i^u^; and Ae city of Tyrus, of two syllables^ is reduced to a 
monosyllable in the English Tyre. 



Smks for pronouncing the Consonants of Greek and Latin 

Proper Barnes. 

9- C«nd G are hard before a, o, and t«^ as CatOy ComuSj Cures, 
Galba, - Gorgon, &c. — and soft before e, i, and y, as Cebes,, 
Sc^no, Scylla, Cinnu, Geryon, Geta, Gillus, Gyges, Gymnoso^ 
phistd^, kc.* . 

10* T, S, add C, before ia, ie, ii, io, iu, and eu, preceded by 
die accent, in Latin words, as in English, change into sk and zh,, 
18 Tatian, Statim, Fortius, Portia, Socias, Cadiu:eus, Accius, 
HelvetU, Macsia, Hesiod, &c. pronounced Tashean, Stasheus, 
Porshem, Porshea, Sosheas, Cadusheus, Aksheus, Heheshei, 
Mezhea, Hetheod, &^. See Principles of English Pronunci^ 
action prefixed to -the Pronouncing Dictionary, No. 357^ 4^0, 



* Tliat this general foTe shoold be violated by smatteren in the learned Ian- 
gnage8 in inch words as Gfjf mnos^, Heter^geneimSf &:c it is not to be wondered 
at; bat that men of real learning, who do not want to show themselves off to 
ti|e vnlgar by such inuendos of their erudition, should give into this irregula- 
rity, is really surprising. We langh at the pedantry of the. a^e of James the 
First, where there is scarcely a page in any Eniplishbook that is not sprinkled 
witii twenty Greek and Latin quotations ; and yet do not see the siaular pe* 
dantry of interlarding our pronunciation with Greek and Latin sounds ; which 
may be affirmed to be a greater perversion of our langnage than the former. 
In the one case, the mtroduction of Greek and Latin quotations does not inter- 
lere with the English phraseology ; but hi the other the pronunciation is dis- 
turbed, and a motley jargon of sounds introduced,, as iucoasisteBt with true 
taste as it is with neatDesi and uoifonnity. 



45 1, 459/ 463. But when the agcent is on die first of dite difh^ 
thoBgal vowels^ the pre^ediog caiiaoiiant does not go inlo $h, 
but pre9^ryes its sound pure, as MUtiades, Antiates, &c. S^ 
the word Satiety in tljie Qrit. Prop. Diet. 

11. T mi Sf in proper name^; ebdiog in tia, sia,q/on, mi 
^ioUf preceded by the accent, chimge the t and s into sjkmizh. 
Huis Phqcion, Sicyon, and Cercyon, are proAOipced o^ajcdy in 
our own analogy, as if written Phoshean, Sisfiean, ^ Sersheq%r 
Artemisia and Abasia sound as if written Artemizhea and j^- 
pazhea: Galatia,Aratia, Ahtia^ and :Ba^ia> as. if writjten Galor 
shea, Arashea, Aloshea, and Bashea : and if Atia, the town in ^ 
Campani^y is not so pronounced, it is to distiogidush it firoQi 
Asia, the eastern region of the world. But die termioation tion 
(of which there are not even twenty examples in proper name^ 
throughout the whcile Greek and liatin languages) seems to pre- 
serve the t from going into sh, as the last reninant of a learned 
pronunciation ; and to avoid, as much as possible, assimilati];){; 
with so vulgar ap Ei^lish termination : dins, though Msion., 
Janon, Dionysion, change the s into ;?, as if written Mzion, Ja-- 
zion, Dionizion, the jt does not become zh; but Pbi^tion, Grth' 
iion, Eurytion, Doiion, Androtiou, Hifpotionp Ipiitiam, Omy* 
iian, Metiqn, Polytion, Stratiqn, Sotiqu, JEanticnn, PaIl(U!Uipjify 
Mtum, Hippocpation, and Amp^ctiq^, preserve .t)ie t in its tn|e 
sound : Hephastioi^, however, from the frequency of appearii^ 
with Alexander, has deserted the small cU^ of jiis Greek com- 
panions, and joined the English multitude, by rhy^^ing vvith 
question ; and Tatian and Theodotion seem perfecdy a^^jicise^. 
With very^ veiy few exceptions, therefore, it may be cqncludedj 
that Greek and Latip proper names are prqnounced alike, 
wd.that both of them follow the analog qf ^ngljsh prqnusb^ 
ciation. 

12. Ch» These letters before a vowel are alws^s pronounced 

like k, as C/u^brias, Choifhis ; Sec. ; but when they come befoi^f 

a mute consonant at the beginning of a word, as in Chthonia, 

diey are mute, and the word is pronounced as if v^rittep Thonifl, 

Words beginning widi Sche, as ^chedim^ Se^eri^y 8cq, are mo# 



XXIV RULES FOE PRONOUNCING 

"nounced 3S if written Skedius^ Skeria, &c.y and c before n in 
'ibe Latin praenomen Cneus or Crutus is mute ; .so in CnopuiSf 
'' Cnosus, &€". and before t in Cteatus, and g before n in Gmidm — 
pronounced Nopus, Nosus, Teatus, and Nidus. 

IS- At the beginnii^ of Greek words we frequendy find the 
tbcombinable consonants MN, TMf Sec. as Mnemosyjiey MnC" 
sidarHuSf Mneus, ^nestem, Tmolm^ 8cc. These are to be pro- 
nounced with the first consonant mute, as if written Nemosyne, 
Nesiddmus, Neus, Nesteus, Molm, &c. in the same manner as we 
pronounce the words Bdellium, Pneumatic^ Gnomon^ Mnemo^ 
nics, 8cc. without the initial consonant. The akme may be ob- 
served of the C hard like K, when it comes before T 5 as Ctest- 
phoTif Ctesippus, See. Some of these words we see son^etimes 
written with an e or i after the first consonant^ as Menesteus, ZV- 
'molus, &c. and then the initial consonant is pronounced* 

14. PA, followed by a consonant, is mute, as Phthia, Phthio^ 
thf pronounced Thia, Thiotis, in the same manner as the natu- 
ralised Greek word Phthisick pronounced Tisick. 

15. Ps:-—^ is mute also in this combination, as in Psyche, 
'PsammetichuSj, Sec. pronounced Syke, Sammeticusy &c. 

16. Pt, p is mute in wor4s beginning with these letters when 
followed by a vowel, as Ptolemy, Pterilas, &c. pronounced 
Tolemy, Terihsy 8cc. ; but when followed by /, the t is heard, 

- as in Tleptolemusi for though we have no words of our ovm 
with these initial consonants, we have many words that end with 
them, and fhey are certainly pronounced. The same may be ob* 
served of the z in Zmilaces, 

17. The letter S, X, and Z, require but little obs^^ation, 
being generally pronounced as in pure English words. It may 
however' be remarked, that $, at the end'of words, preceded by 
any of the vowek but 6, has its pure hissing sound ; as mas, 
disj OS, mus, 8lc. — but when e precedes, it goes into the sound 
of z;2is pes, Thersites, vates, &.c. It. may also be observed, 
that when it ends a word preceded by r ori^ it has the sound 
of X. Thus th^ letter s in mens, Mars, mors, &c. has the 
same sound ;us in the English words hens, stars, wars, Scc^ X^ 



4 

GREEK AND LATIN PROPER NAMES.. XXV 

y/hen begiomng a word or sellable, is pronounced like;r; as 
.'Xerxes, Xenophon, &c. are pronounced Zerkzesy Zenophan, &c. 
Z 18* umformly pronounced as in English words: thus the _z 
in ieno and Zeugma is pronounced as we hear it inzealf 
'Z<me,iuc. . ■ 

Rules for ascertaining the English Quantity of Greek and 

Latin Proper Names. 

18. It may at first be observed^ that in words of two sylla- 
bles^ with but one consonant in the middle, whatever be the 
quantity of the vowel in the first syllable in Greek or Latin^ wc 
dways make it long in English : thus Crates the philosopher, 
and crates a hurclle ; decus honour, and dedo to give ; oijo ta 
triumph, and ovum an egg ; Numa the legislator, and Numen 

m 

the divinity, have the first vowel always sounded equally long 
by an English speaker, although in Latiil the first vowel in^die 
first word of each of these pairs is short.* 

19. On the contrary, words of three syllables, with the ac- 
cent on the first and with but one consonant after the first syl- 
lable, have that syllable pronounced short, let the Greek or Latin 
quantity be what it will : thus regulus and remora, mimicus aiijl 
'minium, are heard with the first vowel short in Ei^lish pro- 
nunciation, though the two first words of each pair have dieir 
first syllables long in Latin : and the u in fumigo and fugito is 
pronounced long in both words, though in Latin the last u is 
^o^t. This rule is never broken but when the first syllable i^ 
followed by e or t, followed by another vowel : in this case the 
vowel in the first syllable is loi^, except that vowel be i : thus 
lamia, genius, Libya, doceo, cupio, have the accent on the first 
syllable, and this syllable is pronounced long m every word but 
Xt&ya, though in the original it is equally short in all. 

20. It must have frequently occurred to those who instruct 
youth, that though the quantity of the accented syllable of long 

proper names has been easily conveyed, yet that the quantity of 

' ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ .■ .A. 

. * The only word occurring to me at present, where this rule is not obserred. 
Is Cawm, a Rule, which is always pronoaaced like the word Canwm, a piece of 
''^^rdiiance, ' 



SXV| miTLES FOB PmONOUNCINO 

Ae precediiig unaccented syllables has occasioned soxhe -em* 
bairassment. An appeal to the laws of oUr own laoguage 
-would soon have rensoved the perplexity^ and enabled us to 
pronounce the initial unaccented syllaUes with as much de- 
cision as the others. Thus every accented antepenultimtt^ 
vowel but u^ even when followed by one consonant only,, is, in 
our pronunciation of Latin, as well as in English, short: thus 
fabula, separo, diligo, nobilis, cucumis, have the first vowels 
pronounced as in the English words, capital, celebrate, simonjfp 
solitude, lucvlent, in direct opposition to the Latin quantity, 
which makes every antepenultimate vowel in all these wordjs 
but the last long; and this we pronounce long, though short in 
Latin. But if a semi-consonant diphthong succeed, then eveij 
such vowel is long but i in our pronunciation of both lan- 
guages ; and EuganeuSy Eugenia, filius, folium, dubia, have the 
vowel in the antepenultimate syllable pronounced exactly as 19 
the Ei^li^ words satiate, menial, delirious, notorious, penurious; 
Aough they are all short in Latin but the i, which we pronounqe 
^ort, thou^ in the Latin it is loi^. 

21. The same rule of quantity takes place in those syllables 
vehich have the secondary accent : for as we pronqupce lamen- 
tation, demonstration, diminution, domination, lucubration, vntli 
eveiy vowel in the first syllable short but u, so we pronounce 
liie same vowels in the same manner in lamentatio,^d€monstratiOf 
diminutio, dominatio, and lucubratio: but if a semi-consonant 
diphthong succeed the secondary accent, as in Ariovistus, Heli^ 
odorus', Gubinianus, Herodiaims, and Folusianus, every vowel 
preceding die diphthong is long but i; just- as we should pro-' 
•nounce these vowels ui the English words amiability, mediator 
rialf propitiation, excoriation, centuriator. Sic. For the nature • 
of die' secondary accent, see Principles prefixed to the Critical 
Pronouncing Dictionaiy, No. 544. 

€2. But to reduce these rules into a smaller compass, that 
they may be more easily comprehended and remembered, it 
may be observed, 'tliat as we always shorten every antepenulti- 
mate vowel with the primary accent but u, unless followed bj^ 



«REEE ANi> LATIN VTLOTER NAMES. anCfti 

m semi-con^onaot diphthong, though this antepenultimate vowd 
b often loi^ in Greek and Latin^ as JEsfhylus, JEschines, Sue. \ * 
and the antepenultimate i, even though it be followed by such a 
<tiphtiioi^; as Bleudnia^ Ocrmay &€.— so we diorteh the first 
stable of JEsctUapius, Mnobarbus, Sic. because the first syl^ 
table of both these words has the secondary accent : but we 
pronounce tlie same vowels l6Bg in Mtkicpiaf JSgialeta, Hali* 
artiis, ^&c. because this accent is followed by a semi-consonant 
diphthong. 

125. This rule sometimes holds good where a mute and liquid 
intervene, and determines the first syllable of Adrian^ Adriatic^ 
8cc. to t>e long like ^, and not short like add : and it is on this 
analogical division of the words, so little understood or attended 
to, that a perfect and a consistent pronunciation of them de- 
pends. It is this analogy that determines the first i« to be long 
in stupiduSf and the y short in clypea^ though both are short in 
the Lajtin; and the o in the first syllable of Coriolanus, which is 
short in LatiQ, to be long in Ei^ish. 

f 4. The necessity of attending to the quantity of the vowel in 
the accented syllable has sometimes produced a division of 
words, in the following vocabulaiy that does not seem to convey 
the actuatl pronunciation. Thus the words SulpHimy jinicium, 
Artemisium, 8lc. being divided into Sulpif i^us, A-nid i-um, 
Ar^te-md i-um, 8ic. we fancy the syllable after the accent de- 
prived of a consonant closely united with it in sound, and 
which, from such a union, derives an aspirated sound eqniva* 
lent to sh. But as the sound of t, c, or 5, in diis situation, is so 
generally understood, it was thought more eligible to divide the 
words in this manner, than into Sul-pi' ti-us, A-ni' ci-um, Ar-^te^ 
mi' si'Um, as in the latter mode the i wants its shortening con- 
sonant, and might, by some speakers, be pronounced^ as it ge- 
nerally is in Scotland, like ee. The same may be observed of & 
and g when they end a syllable, and are followed by e or t, as in 
Ac-e-ra-tus, Ac-i-^a! li-Uj Tig-el4i'nus, Tegfy-ra, &c. where ^ 
the c and g ending a syllable, we at first s^t thmk ^em to 
have their hard sound; but, by observit^ the succeedii^ vowels 



tXVUl RULES FOB PRONOUNCING 

we sooii perceive them to be soft, and only made to end a syl- 
lable in order. to determine the shortness of the vowel which pire- 
cedes. ', 

£5.. The general rule therefore of quantity indicated by the 
syllabication adopted in the vocabulaiy is, that when a coobo^ 
nant ends a syllable the vowel is always short, whether the accent 
be on it or not ; and that when a vowel ends a sylltble with the 
accent on it, it is always long : that the vowel u, whe^i it ends 
a syllable, is long whether the accent be on it or not, an<i thsit 
the* vowel i (3) (4) when it ends a syllable without the accent^ is 
pronounced like e ; but if the syllable be final, it has its lone 
open sound as if the accent were on it : and the same may be 
observed of the letter y. 

Hvles for pluQvng the Accent of Greek and Latin Proper 

Names. 

26. Words of two syllables, either Greek or Latin, whatever 
be the quantity in the origiDal, have, in English pronunciatioiiy 
the accent on the first syllable: and if a single consonant bome 
between two vowels, the consonant goes to the last syllable, 
and the vowel in the first is long ; as Cato, Ceres, Comui, 
&c. See Principles of English Pronunciation prefixed to the 
Critical Pronouncing Dictionary. No. 503, and the word 
Dramay^ ' 

£7. Polysyllables, adopted whole from the Greek or Latin 
into English, have generally the accent of the Latin : that is, 
if the penultimate be long the accent is on it, as Severn^, 
Democedes, Sec. ; if short, the accent is on the sdntepenultimate, 
as Demosthenes, Aristophanes, Posthumus, 8cc. See Introduc-i 
tion. 

28. When Greek. or Latin Proper Names are anglicised, 
either by an alteration of the letters, or by cutting oflFthe latter 
syllables, the accent of the original, as in appellatives under 
the same predicament, is transferred nearer to the beginning 
of the word. Thus Proserpina has the accent on the s?con4 



GREEK AND LATIN PBOFER NAMES. XXIX 

syllable; buf when altered to Proserpin^f it transfers the accent 
to the first. The ^me may be observed of HomeruSy Firgi^' 
liuSy Haratita, &cl when anglicised to Homery Firgil, Horace, 
&c. See the word Academy in the Critical Pronbuncii^ Dic- 
dbnary. 

ISg. As it is not very easy, therefore, so it- is not necessary to 
decide where* Doctors disagree. When reasons lie deep m 
Greek and Latin etymology, the current pronunciation wiU be 
followed, let the learned do al| they can to hinder it : thus, after 
Hyperion has been accented by our best poets according to 
our own analogy wi^ the accent on the antepenultimate, as 
Shakespeare : 

<< Hypi^rion*s ciiris, the front of Jove himself.''— JETamJef. 

u that vrag to this 

« HypifrioH to a Satyr.'* IM. 

€i next day after dawn, ' 

" Doth rise and help Hype' rUm to his horse."— Henry Vth, 
.' ■ ' ■ ' ■ ' ■ 

So Cooke in his translation of HesiodHs Theogony follows the ac- 
centuation of Shakespeare: 

Hyperion and Japhety brotiiers, join : 
Thea and Rhea of this ancient line 
, Descent} ; and Tkemis boasts the source divine 

The fruits of TkU and Hyperion rise, 
And with refulgent lustre light the skies. 




f 



After this established pronunciation, I say, how hopeless, a3 
well as useless, would it be to attempt the penultimate accentu<' 
ation, which yet ought undoubtedly to be preserved in reading 
or speakii^ Greek or Latin compositions; but, in reading or 
ispeaking English, must be left to thase who would rather appear 
learned than judicious. But Jcrion, Ariouy Amphion, Echion, 
Orion, Ijpion, Pandion, Asion, Alphion, Mrion, Ophion, Me- 
thionj Axion, FAon, Thl^xion, and Sandion, freserye their penulti- 
mate accent invariably : while Ethalion, a word of the same form 
and origin, is pronounced with the accenton the antepenultimate, 



RULES FOR FRONOUKCIKO 

like Deucalion and Pjfgmalion : and this, if I mistake not)^ is die 
commoii pronunciation of a diip in tbe Britidi navy, so called 
from the name of the Argonauts, who accompanied Jason in his 
e^qiedjition to Colchis to fetch the golden fleece. 

30. The same difficulty of deciding between common usage 
and classical propriety .appears in words ending in ia; as 
Alexandria, Antiachiti, Seleucia,Samariay Iphigenia, and several 
odiers which were pronounced yby our ancestors, as appears from 
dieir poetry, according to our own analogy, with' the accent on 
die antepenultimate syllable ; and there is no doubt but everf 
wonl of diis form would have fellen into the s%me accentuation^ 
if classical criticism had not stepped in and prevented it. A phi-* 
losophical grammarian would be apt to think we are not much 
obliged to scholars for this interruption of the vernacular cur- 
rent of pronunciation : but as there is so plausible a plea as that 
of reducing words to their original languages, and as a know- 
ledge of these languages will always be an honourable distinction 
among men, it is strongly to be suspected that these words will 
not long continue in dieir plain homespun English dress. Tliia 
critical correction, however, seems to have come too late for 
some words, which, as Pope expresses it, have '^ slid into yerse,'^ 
and taken possession of our ears; and therefore, perhaps, the 
best way of disclosing of them will be to consider them as the an«* 
cients did the quantity of certain doubtful syllables, and to pro-^ 
nounce them either way; Some, however, seem always to have 
preserved the accent of their original language, as Thalia and 
Sophia : but Iphigenia, Antiochia, Seleucia, and Samaria, have 
generally yielded to the English antepenultimate accent; and 
Erythia, Deidamia, Laodamia, Hippodamia, Apamia, Ilithyia, 
and Orithyia, from their seldom appearing in mere English 
composition, have not often been dravm aside into plain English, 
pronunciation. The same may be observed of 'words ending 
in mens or nice : if tliey are compounded of the Grek vtxn, 
the penultimate syllable b always long, and ihust have the ac- 
cent, as Stratonicus, Berenice, &c. ; if this termination be what 
is called a gentile, signifying a man by his country, the penulti*, 



ciltSBK AN9 XATIH TBOFfia NAMES. XlZt 

mste is skort, attd tfae acceitt is on the antq^etmkiiiuite ; is jlfisce-^ 
nlomcfcfy Sard^mcuB, BritannkuSf 8u:« See A]NDBONicufi« 
, tU Thmi we see man^ of diese proper names areof ddbioos 
acctfnUiattoa ; imd the authorities which may be produced on 
boith sides sudflfieiently riiew us the inutility of criticisiiig beyond 
a certain pdint. It is in these as in mai)y English words : 
di^re are some wlndi> if mispronouncedy immediately diow a 
want of -edtt^ation^ and there are others which, thongb not 
pronounced in the most erudite manner, stamp no imputation 
of ignorance or illiteracy. To have a general knowledge, there- 
figr«y of the pronunciation of thiese words, seems absolutely ne- 
ci^sary for those who would appear respectable in the more re- 
q^table part of society. Perhaps no people on earth are so 
correct in tfadr accentuation of proper names as the learned 
among the English. ' The Port-Royal Grammar informs us, 
Aat /^ notwithstanding all die rules that can be gnren, we are 
*' often under die necessity of submitting to custom^ and of 
'' accommodating our pronunciation to what is received among 
^' the learned according to the country we are in." ^' So we 
^' we pronounce/' says the grammarian '^ ArUto' hidm^ Basi' lius, 
'' Iddliunif with the accent on the antepenultimate, though the 
** penultimate is long, because it is the custom : and, on the 
'' contrary, we pronounce Andrefas^ id^ a, Mar^a, &c. with the 
'' accent on the penultimate, though it is short, because it is die 
« custom of the most learned. The Italians,'' continues he, *^ place 
*^ die accent on the penultimate of antonomasi% harmomfa, 
** philosophi% theofogifa, and similar words, according to die 
<< Greek accent,, because, as Ricciolius observes, it is the custom 
of their country. Alvarez and Gretser think we ought always 
to pronounce diem in this manner, though the custom, not only 
of Germany and Spain, but of all France, is against it : but 
'^ Nebrissensis authorises this last pronunciation, and says, that it 
is better to place the accent of these vowek on the antepenulti- 
mate syllable; which shows," concludes die granmiarian, 
^^ that Yibsxk we once depart from die ancient rules, we have but 
^* litde -certainty in practice, which is so different in diffesfiSLV 
^* countries,'' % 



it 

€€ 
it 



U 

it 



RULES FOR PRONOUNCING, &C. » 

But however uncertain and desultory the accentuatioabf many 
words may be, it is a great satisfacticHi to a speaker to know that 
ftey are so. There is a Vnde difference between 'pronouncing 
words of this kind ignorandy said knowingly. A person who^ 
knows fliat scholars themselves differ in the pronunciation of these 
words can always pronounce with security : but one, who is ac- 
quainted with the state of the accent, is not sure that he is right 
when he really is so, and always pronounced at his perils 



*^* It is hoped the candid pertiser of this work mil make 
allowances for an occasional error in ^dividing a syllable iff 
placif^ an accent, when he reflects onjthe difficulty with whicH 
such a work must necessarily be attended. The Author fatten 
himself, however, that such attention has been paid both to th€ 
compildtion and the proofs, that the fewest errors iinagindbU 
have escaped him. 



»•". 




«.» 



GREEK anft LATIJV PROPE]^ JfAMES. 



INITIAL VOCABULARY. 






%* Whea 9 word is fucceedBct by a word printed iar IlaHei^ the latter wotd 
is merefy to sp^H ftiie fom^as it oogbt tO'be prbli<mnced« fi}iiis Ahonitkem Is 
the tm^ pr9i|ai|eii^ji^.of jUie pr^eed^g voirjd4M(Mw; and so of tlierest. 

%* The Figures aniexe^ ta the words refer to the]^les prefixed to theWoik. 
Tfaos the figinre (S) iflt^ ^cM v^«s t<^ Rule the $4 for t|K^ pronnnciation of 
Ihe final t; and lA^ 4nffeX4) after ^1^ reien^ Itple the 4th^ for the pronm- 
elation of the niSMyf^f^wtt, not ^ao^ : ai|d soj^ tib^erest. : 

%* Wh^|^etetl9K9^J5jf^« areputaflberaw9Bf4 itifttoshowtfaatthi^ 
istheprec94l9giQ9|Ki4n8pcu^ Tlios X^t^ooii^^qig^ is th^ Lt^ti^ word iMem- 
fn», diangjsd mtp IJ^ ^^nt^ 



BBRi 



iffB9i 



U.* " ' i'" '" '''^ . \\.\^. 



at- 



Ab' a*a 
Ab'a-ba 
Ab-a-ce' ne (8) 
Ab'a-ga 
Ab' a-lu^ (20) 
fAJja'na (7) 
A-ban' t^s 
A-baa'ti-a9(lQ) 



. AB 

* * ■ . 

Abra94i i|r^(l) 

A-bail^tj-dBy9<4> 

A-bao'tis . 

Ab-ar-l^a're-^ (7) 

Ab>rn(3) 

A4]|ar']rmofn<4) 

Ab'a.ris(7) 

A-ba'ru«(l) 



A^bas(l) 
A-bp'sadX?)* 
•Ab-a.i^^tis(7)(l) 
Ab-9Srse' na ( 1 > (7)^ 
Abi^^flkse'ni; - 

A-bf|a^8U8(7} 
AVa-to9(7X 
Ab-darloQ' iri|iU9 (^ 

Ab-4^ra(l)(7) 



.'* Every a ending ajtyllable, with the accent appn it, is prpnonnced ,fike the 
a m <the £i^g^ words/s-tHmr, in-vfr, Uc. 3f^ Ri^e khe Ist^ prefii^ |to jti^it vo- 

cabalpy. , 

t i^yery unaccented a, wh^tiier uiit^ ^ledtjO, or ^nal, ending ajjj^Uable^ ^ 
an oWnwc soond, borderinf^ on Uie a mfatk/tr. Sae Role the Vtl^*^^ ~ * '"" ^ ^ 

. . . *- 



to 



■ ' <■ 



AB 



AC 



AC 



Ab^e'ri-a(l)(4)(7) 
Ab-de-ri'tes (1) 
Ab-de'nis(l) 
A4)e'a.taB{7)(l)(5) 

A-bena(7) 
Ab^l-Ii^Tiiid 

A'bi-a(l)(4)(7) 

A-ben'da(7) 

Ab'ga-nis 

A' bi-i (4) 

Ab'i-la(4)(7) 

A-bi8'a-re8(7) 

A-bi^a-ris(7) • 

Ab'i-son'tes (4) 

Ab-le'tes(l) 

A-bob'iri-cU(4) 

A-bc/ biis 

A-bofcc'ri-tus (5) 

Ab-o-ia'ni(S) 

A-b9'lus<7)(l) 
Ab-6n-i-tei'cho8 (5) 

Ab-o-ra'€a(l)(7) 
Ab-o-rig'i-nes (4) 
A-bor' ras ^7) 
Ab-ra-da'tas 
Ab-ra-da'tes 
A-bren'tius (10) , 
A-broc'o-mas \ 

Ab-rod-i-aB'tus<4) 
Ar bron'y-cHs (6) 
A-bro' ni-U8 (4) 

Ab'ro-ta(7) 
A-brol^ o-iHim 
A-bryp' o-lis (6) 
Ab-se' u« ^ - 
Ab-8iii'thi-i(4) 
Ab'so-nw 
Ab-syr'tosCe) 
Ab-s^y tua (6) 



>^ 



Ab-u-li'tes (!) 
Ab-y-de'm(6) 
Ab-yTde'nu8 (6) 
A-by'di(e) 
A-by dos (6) 
Arb/das 
Ab'y-la (6) 
Ab'y-k»KS> 
Ab-ys-si'ni (I) 
Ab-ys-sin'i-a (6) 
Ac-a-cal'lb (7) 
Ac-a^ce'ai-um (10) 
AkHXrStf zherum 
A-ca'ci-us (10) 
A'kafshe-us 
Ac-a.de'nii-a (7) 
Ac-a-de^mus 
Ac-a-hn' drus 
A-^V le (8) 
A-ca-mai^chis (7) 
Ac' a-mas (7) 
A^camp'sis (7) 
A-can'tha (7) 
A-can'thud(7) 
Ac'a-ra(7) 
A-ca'ri-a(7) 
Ac-ar-na'iii-a(7) 
A-caF^nas (7) 
A-cas' ta (7) 
A*ca8'tu8(7) 
Ac-a-than' tus (7) 

Ac'ci-a(10)(7) 
Ah! she-a 
Ac/ci-Ia (7) 
Ac'ci-u8(10) 
Akft^-m 
Ac'cu-a (7) 
A'ce(8) 
Ac-e-di'ci(3)(24) 



Ac'e*la(24). 
Ae-e-ra' tus (27) 
A-cer' bas 
Ac-e-ri'iia(l) 
A-ceKne (4) 
Ac-tir-sec'a-mes 
A'ces(7) 
A-ce'si-a ( k0> 
Ac-e-si'nes (1) 
Ac>c-8i'nu8 (1) 
A*ce' si-US (10) 

A-ce«'tes 
A-ces'ti-um (10) 
A-ces-to-d6' rus 
A-ces-tor'i-des 
A-ce'tes 
*Ach.a.b/tos(12) 

A-chaB'a(7> 
A-ch»'i (3) 
A-cWi-um 
A-chaem' e-nes 
Ach-ae-me' ni-a 
Ach-ae-mei/ i-dej» 
A-chae' us 
A-cha'i-a (7) 
Ach'a-ra(7) 
Ach-a-ren' sfcs 
A-char' nap (4) 
A-cha' tes 
Ach-e-lo' i-des (4) 
Ach-e-lo'ri-um - 
Ach-e-lo' us 
A-cher'dus 
A-dier' i-mi (3) (4) 
Ach'e-ron 
Ach-e-rbn'ti.a (10) 
Ach;«-ru'8i-a(il) 
Ach e-ru' si-as (1 1) 



^ Aehtlbytos, — Chy 1b this and all the tubteqaent words hare'itfae 'sound of k, 
TUns Achabytoiy AduBo^ Achate$y &ci, are proiioiuicc4 M if written AhOtftos^ 
Ak0m^ Alutiii* &ۥ See Kale the istlw 



AC 



Ache' OB 


A-cra'tus 


Atfa-maa 


Adiirias 


A'cri-M (4) 


Adra-maa'tus 


A-chil'h-us 


Ac-ri-doph'.-gi(3) 


Adaa'pi-i(4) 


Ach-a-le-. (7) 


A-enoii(ll) 


Ad'a-dia 


Aeh-il-lei-en'ie. 


Ac-ris-i-o'ne 


Ad-de-pha'gi-a 


Ach-il W . 


Ac.ri8-i-o-ne'l» 


Ad'dii-a(7) 


A-chiP les 


Ac-ris-i-o-ni'a-des 


A-del'phi-ua 


Ach-il-]«'ura 


A-cris'e-iu<10) 


A-Um<m 


A-chi'ri(<> 


A-cri'ta»(l) 


A' dea, or Ha' dea 


AchUiWui 


Ac-ro-a' thou 


Ad-gan-dea' tri-us 


Ach-o-Wi(3) 


Ac-ro-ce-rau'oi-um 


Ad-haK bal 


Ac-ni-dl'im (7) 


Ac-ro-co-rin'thm 


Ad-hei'baa 


Ach-o-b'e 


A'cron(l) 


Ad-i.ali'te(8) 


Ach-Fa-di'na 


Ac-ro-ua' toa 


A-di-at' o-rix 


Ac-i.eho'ri-m 


A-cr„p'o-lis 


Ad-i-man' tus 


Ac.i-iU'li-«(8) 


Ac-ro-la 


Ad-me' la (7) 


Ac-i-da'i> 


A-crot'a-tua 


Ad-i-me'te . 


A-ciri-a 


Ac-ro'lho-ca 


Ad-me' Ills 


Ac-i-lig-e-oa (44) 


Ac- 1.(7) 


A-do'ni-a 


A-ciTim 


Ac-Wa (7) 


A-do'nia 


A-ciPl.(7) 


Ac-lai-on (4) 




A'cU 


Ac-be' us (4) 


A-dra'na (7) (1) 


Ac'moD 


Ai^te(8) 


A-dra' num 


Ac-inon'i-d«8(4) 


Ac'ti-a (10) 


A-dnia'ta 


A-cct'ma 


Ac-eij 


A-dras'ti-* 


A-co'tiffl(4> 


Ac-tia'a-iies 


A-draa'lu. 


A-con'tes 


Ac'd-umdO) 


A'dri-a (SS) 


A-con'te-us 


Ac'ti-iis(lO) 


A-driVnuin 


A-con'ti.u. (10) 


Ac- tor 


A-dri-.fi-cain 


A-con-to-lw'Iils 


Ac-loi'i-des 


A-dri-an-op^o-lia 


A-co'm 


Ac-b/ris 


A-dri-a' nua 


A' cm 


A-au'phig 


^ifr.-an(Eln.) 


A'cne 


A-cii-.i la'iu 


Ad-ri-me'tmn' 


A-ciWaC?) 


A-cuticua, MJ 


Ad-u-at'i-cit4) 


A-cr«pb'ra-«(7) 


A'ifa(7) 


A-dyr-ma-chi'dB 


Ac-nigia-li'cl»C4) 


A-dK'ui 


*iE-a(7j 


Ac'ni-ga3 (7) 


Ad-a-man-ta;'a (7) 


iE-a-ce'^ 



■ jEo. — Tbia -diphUioog k merel; ocular, for Ihe a lias no ^re in the soondL 
tbongh it appean In tbe type. Tinted as we pronounce the 4, there Ii no middle 
sDuad between that letter and e, and therefore we liavn adopted the ]a(t vo\re\ antf 
lelinqiiiihed the fint. This, among other ^aains, maket it probable ibat the 
Oierli a>iil Boiuuii proDonnced the u as -vie do in watti-f a^ tlia < fu we bw it 
B2 ' . M 



mof 



Ma 



MK 



^-ac'i-des 
JE' a-c w 

j£-an*te'im) 
iEUan'ti-<lefl 
^-an'tis 

.^Bch-mac^o-ras 
^ch' mis 
iE-dep'sum 

ifi-di'le9 (8) 

.dS-dip'sus 

JE'don 

JS'du-i,orHed'ii-i 

^-el'lo 

iE'ga 
.^ge'as 
iE'ga (5> 
iE-gae'aB 

iE-ga' le-vm 
iE'gtm 

iE'gas (6^ 
iE-ga^tes 



• 

JE-ge'le-on' 
^-ge' lia 

iE^i'a-le 

^.p-a'U^a(«2)(4) 

^-gi'fa-liu^ 

-ffi-gi'des 

iE-gi'la 

^^ri-a . 

^-gflnfi-us 

^g-i-mo'nM 

JE-gi'na 

^g-i-ne' la 

-^g-i-ne' tes 

-3S^i'o-chus 

^-gi' pan 

iE-gi'ra 

-3E-gir-o-6fi^8a 

t^'gis' 

M'^ thus 

JE-gi'tum 

iE-gi-uni , 

iEg'le 

iEg'les 

JEg-Wiea 

'JE-gob'o-lu$ 

jSE-goc'e^iros 

iE'gon 

£'gos pot^a-mos 

^-gos'4he-na 



Mgy(6) 

iEg-y-pa'iies 

JE'gyp'soB 

^-irp^ti^i(4)pd) 

M-gy^A'Umr{ioy 

.^-gyp'tiis 

JE'li-a 

iE-li-a'nmf 

iEMUusand^^Ura 
^-lu'nis 
^-miri-a ^ 
^-mil-Wiias 

JE mon 
jlBui o-na 
-Sl-iHGi'ni-a 
JE-mon'i-dwi' 
I JE'mus 
iE-myF i-a 
^.myl-i-a'ntt^ * 
JE^iayV yi (4) 
M^myY i-us 
iE-na^ri-^ 
iE-ne'a 
^-•ne' a-dig8 
^-ni'a-die 
^.nc<aB 
^jie'ira 
IE.nefis 
iE-ne'i-de8(4)' 
£-iies-*i-de' mm 



in where and there; flie middle or mizt syund tiiea would he like a iniMiier^ 
wUch was pro l i ib ly the sound tl^ gave to tfati d%iht|ong. 

. t .^^ri».^-^^iniil diphthbogy thohi^ loi^ in Greek and liatia, is in English pro- 
innciation either long or short, acc<Mrditig to Ihe accent or position of it. Xbosy 
if it immediately precedes the accent as in Mgeue^ or with tiie accent on it, ber 
fpre asingle etnsonant, in a wior4 of .two sylhibles, it islon^, as in ^gUff hefiire 
two consonants it is shtrtt as in JEgUe; or hefore one only, if the accent Vc^ 09 
fhe'aatepemiitimter as iSroptcf .—For the txceptioas to this mle, see Role 2t 



iKS 



AO 



AG 



>9 



JE-nef tus 

iE-m'o-chitia) 

iE'nos 

^-o'li-a 

iE.o'li-» 

jE-ori-da 

JE'o-lus; 
^-o'ra 
JE-paili-tis 
M'ffef/a . 
^p^'u-lo (21) 
iE'py£6) 
^p'y-tus(21) 
^-qua' na (7) 
JE'qui (3) 
^•quic'o-li 

iE'ri-as 

-Er'o-pe 

JEt' o-pu* 

^s'a-cus . 

JEr-saf pus 

£^ sar, - or M-^ ras 

iEfi;'chi-Bes (22) 

JEfi'chi-ron(12) 

:«s'cl^-4ii8(21) 
.£s-i^^^la^pi-ils (22) 



-SE-se^puB 

iE-fle?iUTa 

^^'ou(ll) 

Mson 

^-son'i-des 

^-so' pus 

^ sap ytjog. 

^s'tri-a. 

JEs'u-a 

M-sy e-tea 

iEs-yin-ne'te8(21) 

^-sym^nuB 

iE-thal' i^es 

iE-thir6;pi*a(22) 

iEth'lUus 

JE' thon H 

iE'thra 

JE-ihu'sa 

^'ti-a(10> 

^'ti-on(H) 

;E'ti-us*(10) 

^I'na 

^-to' Iwi 

iE-to'lus 

A' /for 

A-fra'nU 

A-fra' ni-us 

Af n-ca (7) 

Af-ri-ca' nus 

Af ri-cuin • 

A-gag-ri-a'n» 

Ag-a-W;se8 

A-galMa(7) 
A-gaBOi'ma-ts 
Aga-me'<tes 
Ag-a-mem'n<m 
Ag at4nem-no' ni-us 



Ag-a-meftor » . 

Ag-am-neiB^txir 

Ag-a*nip'pe 

A-gan^zarga - 

Ag-a-fie'iio. 

Ag-a-re' ni (3) 

Ag-a-iin^la 

A-gas^i-ckM 

A-gas^ine 

A-gas^ thelites 

A-gas'thus 

Argas^tro-phiis 

Ag^a-tha 

Ag-athiOT^ dii-das 

Ag-ath-ai^ chi-des 

Ag-arii-ar^cus 

A-ga'liii-as ■ 

Ag^a^bo 

A-gath-o-cle'a • 

A-gath'o-cki 

Ag^a-thon 

A-gath-o-n/mns 

Ag-a-th<M' die-nes 

Ag-a-thyr' num 

Ag;a-tllyi'si(3) 

A-jpi've 

A.gau'i<3) 

A-ga'vus 

Ag-des'tis 

Ag-e-e' tOl 

Ag-e-las'tus 

Ag^-la'us 

A-gen'a-dia* 

Ag-en-di'eum 

A-ge'nor 

Ag-e-nor'i-des 

Ag-e-ri' nus 



' m 



* One^f iSie'G^erali of Valentiiiian the tiurd ; wliich, Labbe tells iiSy.oagbt 
properly to bo Written 'Aetius; that is, without the diphthong. We may obsenr^^ 
that as this woM* (joittes'from the Greek, bat b latiAkBed, it » pft>noiuiced wi^ 
the t like shj ta if '#rillVen JEshins; but liie precetliiig word 'mtion^ lifeing pufe 
Greek, dde»i«Dl ^ofeftftai to this^aittlogy.^''^ ltid<! fhe nth tfnd t9th. 



6 AG 

Ag-e-su/der 
A-g^U'M (10) 
Ag-es-i-la' lu 

Ag-e-sip'o-iis 
An-e-sis' tra-ta 
J^;-e-sis' tra-tus 
Ag-graiii' Bies 
Ag-^n'nae 

Ag-i-U' us 

AV* 

Ag-lii'wi 

Ag-la^ a 

Ag la-o-Di'ce 

Ag-la'o-pe 

Ag ta-o-pbie' na 

Ag-la' o-plion 

Ag-Ia-os'lhe-iiei 

Ag-t«i'ros 

Ag-la'us 

Ag*!!* 

Ag'no 
Ag-nod' i'ce 

Ag-BWt' i-de» 
Ag-o-na' li-a, and 

A-go' ni-» 
A^Ho'iiei 
A^o-nis 
A^'dmu 
Ag-o-rac' ri-tiu 
Ag-o-fah' o-mi (8) 
Ag-o-m'iiis 

Ag-O-lW 9, 

A'gra(l) 
AWi(3) 
Ag'ra-gas 
A-frauie 
A-grau' li-a 
A-f^i/ los 
^-rau-o-ni' Ite 
A-gri-a'ces 
A'ffiic'o-la 



AL 

Ag-ri-gen' tnm 
A-grin'i-uiii 
A-gri-o' ni-a 
A-gri'o-pas 
A-gri' o-pe 
A-grip'pa 
Ag-iip-pi'iia 
A-griyo-peCB) 
A'gri-iu(I) 
Ag'ro-litt 
A'groa 
A-gro'taf 
A-grot'e^ra 
A.gyl'e u£ (5) 
A-g)l'la 
Ag-yl-lie' us 
A-^nis 
A-gyKi-um 
A-gyr'i-US 
A;gyf'tM 
A-ha'l* (7) 
A'jax 

A-j-do'ne-iu (5) 
A-im'^-kis 
A-i'us Lo-cu'ti-ua 
Al-a-ban'da ' 
Al'a-biis 
A-ie' aa 
A-la^a 
A-le'i (3) 
A-)i^ua 
Al-a- go'hi-a 
A-la'la 

Al-al-com' e-tue 
A-la' lia (7) 
Al-a-ma'nes 
Al-a-man'iii, or 
Al-e-man' ni 
A-la'ni 
AKa-res 
Al-a-ri'cii? 
Jfa-ric (Eng.) 
Al-a-ro'di-i ^ (4) 



AL 

A-Wtot 

Afa-zon 

Al'ba Syrvi-os 

Al-ba' ni-a 

Al-ba'nus 

Al-bi'ci (3) (4) 

Al-bie'ttt(4) 

Al-bi'iii(5) 

Albi-no'Va'nua 

Al bin te-iue'li-um 

Al-bi'niu 

AV bi-on 

Afbi-us 

Al-bu-cU'I« 

Afbu-la 

Al-bu' rie-a 

Al bui'niu 

Ai bus Pa'gus 

Al-bu' ti-us (10) 

Al'Ctc'us 

Al-cain'e-ne« 

Al-can' der ■ 

Al-can'dre 

Al-ca'nor 

Al-calh'o-e 

Al-cath'o-iw 

Al'ce 

Al-ce'nor 

Al.ces't« 

Al-ce«'tis 

Ayce-tas 

AKchi-das (le) 

Al-chim'a-cus 

Al-ci-bi'a-des (4) 

Al-cid'a-nias 

Al-ci-da -me'a 

Al-ci-dain' i-das 

Al-cJd'a-mus 

Ai-Ci'das 

Al-rfdei 

Al-ckFi-ce 

Al-cbn'e-de 

Al-cim'e-doii 



AL 



AL 



AL 



A-ci]|i' ernes 

Al^ci-mus 

Al-cin'o-e 

Al'ci-nor 

♦Al-cip^o-us 

Al-ci-o'ne-us (5) 

Al^ci-phron 

Al-cip'pe 

Al-cipfpus 

Al'cis 

Al-citb'o-e . . 

Alc-mae'pn 

Alc-ms-on'idae 

Ale' man 

Alc-me'na 

Al-c/o-ne 

Al-cy-o^m-ua (5) 

Al-cyo-na 

Al-des^cu8 

Al-du'a-bis 

A'le^(l)(7) 

A-le'bais 

A-le^bi^ofi 

A-lec'to 

A-lee'tor 

A-Iec'try-on . 

AJec'tus; 

f A-le'i-us Cam' pus 

Al-e-man'iii 



A-le^oaon 

AI-e-mu'si-i(4) 

A' lens 

A'le-on 

A-le'se 

A-le'si-a (10) 

A-le'si-um (10) 

AJe'tes 

A-le'thes 

A-le'thi-a 

A-let'i-das 

A-Ie'tri-um 

A-le'Uim 

Al-eu-a'cbe 

A-le'us 

A'lex(l) 

A-lex-a-me'nus 

JAl-ex-an'der 

Al-ex-an'dra 

Al-^x-an-dri'a (30) 

Al^x~an'dri-des ' 

Al-ex'an-dri'na . 

Al-ex-an-4rop'^-lis 

Al-ex-a'nor 

Al-ex-ar'chus 

A-lex^as 

A-tex'i-a 

A'lehfshe-a 

A-lex-ic'a-cus 



Al-ex-i'nus 

A-lex'i-o 

A-kkshe-o, 

Al-ex-ip^ ips 

Al-ex-ir'a-es 

Al-ex-ir'ho-e 

A-Iex'is 

A-lex'on 

Al-fa-ter'na 

Al-fe'nus 

ATgi-duip 

A-li-ae'mon 

A-li-ai^tum 

A-li-ai-'tus 

Al'i-cis 

A-li-e'nus (21) 

AFi-fie . 

Al-i-l«'i (3) (4) 

A^ti'BA^t^'tu^ . 

A-ii^^dae 

A-lin-de'i-a 

Al-i-jAe'rira 

Al-ir-it>'thi-us 

Anu 

Al-li-e' nos 

Al-lob'ro-ges 

Al-!ob'ry-ge« 

Al-lot'ri-ges 

Al-lu'ti-as(lO) 






* Alemnu, — There are no word* more fireqnently mispronounced by a mere 
English teholar than those of this termination. By saeb a one we sometimes 
hear AkunBm and AwtimUM pronounced in three syUables, as if written AUei^wut 
and AnrH-nouZf rhyming witii vow$: but classical prenanciation reqairu that 
liiese rowels should form distinct syllables, 

t Akiu» Campus. 

Lest fivm idiis flymg steed unrein'd (as once 
fiellerophon, though from a lower clime) 
Dismeuntedy on th' il/eioajfSeU I iaU» 
Erroneous there to wander, and forlorn. 

Milton's Par. Loit. h. vii. t. 17^ 

t Alexandeff^TbkyroTd is as fieqaently pxonoimGtd with the.aaima|^ pQtii^ 
first as OB the thiid syllabte. 

la 4 



» 



.jSsKL 



AM 



kM 



A-lo'a » 
Al-o-e' us 
Ai-o-i'd* 
Al-o-i'd*. 
A-lo'ne 
Al'o-pe 
A-lop' e-ce 
A-lop'e-ces 
A-lo'pi-«6 
A' los 

A-lo'ti-a (TO) 
Al-pe'ntto 
Al'pes 
Alps (Eng.^ 
Al-phe' a 
Al-pK^T-ii 
Al-phe' nor 

Al-pheJfiSJbde' a (6) 

Al-phe-si-te'tifei 

Al-phe' U^ 

Al'phi-<is 

Al-pWbnCtg) 

Al-pi'nus 

Al'pis 

Al'si-um<tO) 

Al'sus 

Al-diae'a 

Al-thtaem' e-nek 

Al-ti' num 

Al'tis 

Athm'ti-uin (10) 

A']i^,Al'U-u» 

A Wa (6) 
Al-y-cae'a 
Al-y-cae'us 
A-lys'sus 
Al-yx-oth' o-c 
A-mad' o-ci (3) 
A*tnad' 6^^m ' 
Aih'aig'e 
Ajn-al-^ae'a 



Am-al»the'ihb 
Am' a-^ ' "' ■ 
A-maxif tes 
Am-an-ti'ni (S) 
A-ma'nus 
A-mar' a-cUs 
A-mar' di (3) 
A-mar'tu8 
Am-bryl'lis 
Am-ar-yn' ce-us (5) 
Am-ar-yn'tlkus 
A' mas 

A-ma'8i-a(10) 
Am-a-se'iii9u9 
A-ma'sis 
A^-mas'tris 
A-mais'tntM 
A-ma'ta 
Am-a-the^i 
Am'a-th^ 
A-iAast-^^'ii^ 
A-mftx^'i-a • 
A-nWaVi-ta 
Am-a-ze^tl€^ 
A-maz!' 6-neh 
Ani or-iom (iEtig.) 
Am-a-zon' i-deS 
Am-a-zo'ui-a 
Am-a-^'iii-um 
Am-a-zo'ni-us 
Am-bar'ri (3) 
Am'be-ims 
Am-bar-va'li-a 
Ato-bi-k-li't6s 
Am-bi-a^nutfi 
Am-bi-a-ti' nuin 
Aai-bi^'tO& 
Ate-bi^o-rfec 
Am'bh^ 
Am-brt'd^ii(tO) 
'Am^bfa'ci-us(lO) 
Aih'^Wi(3f) 
Am-bro'aej 



Am^brd'rfL-iiXTO) ' 

Am.bro'sl-ii8(i6) 

Am-br/oto 

Am-bi^rs'siig 

Am-burii(^) 

Ai6'c-l«s 

Am-e-nifiSiA' 

Am-e-ni' dcS 

A-men'o-^cHls 

A-me' ri-a 

A-mes' M-tus 

A-mes'tris 

A-iteic'W 

Am-ic-la^uft 

A-mic-tae^ob 

A-mic' tas 

A-mi'dk(») 

A-mil'car 

Am'i-lo8^) 

A-mim'di^tie, cfr 

A-myih'b^iM! ' 
A-min'e-a, dr ' / 

Am-mifl'e-li 
A-inin'i-as 
A-min'i-us 
A-min'<l-cl<Sk 
Am-i-se^na 
A-tniVi4s (10) 
A-mis'ssUt 
A-mi'sum 
A-mi' «iu 
Ain-i-tei^Jium 
Arti-i-fha'on, tir 
Aift-y-fta' cm 
Am-milk%' 
Ain-mi-a'tiuft 
Am'iUDn 
Alft-itoo'^hi-a 
AWi^o'fii.i (3) 
AiW-ihb'hi-us 
Am-mo' the-a 
Afn^iii-^ 
Atii^m'^s (S> 



Afn^tto-tne' tus 
A' it^T (1) 
A-mor'ges 
A-mte/gos' 
Am'p^hiS 
Am-pe-hi' 81-41 

Am-phe'a(7-) 
Am-phi-a-la' us 

Am-phi' a-nax 
Am-pM-«t-lra' us 
Am-phi-ar' i-des 
Am-phic'ra-tes 
Am^phic' ty-'on<ll) 
Am-phic-le'a 
Am-phid' a-miis 
Artf4jf>hi-drd^iHi-a 
Am-phi-ge'iii-a, or 
*Am-phi-ige-ni'a (^9) 
Am-pWr o-chiis I 
Am^jJtel' y-ttts 
Am-^pbiin' a-dms 
Am-phim' e-don 
Attt-plSn'o-me 
Am-phin'Ortntis 
Am-phi' on (W) 
Am-phip' o-les 
Am-phip^o-lis 
Am-phip' y-rois 
Am-pbi-re'tus 

3!tm'i«is ' 
'Am-phis-bSb'na 
'Aiii-phis' sa 
Am-pbhis-^e'iie 
Am^Ws'sus 



AN 

Am-phis^ the-ute 
Am-pliis^ti'dcs 
Am-pbiB^tra-tin 
Am-phit'^-a . 
Am-phitb' e-mis 
Am-phith'o-e 
Am-phi-tri' te (8) 
Am-phit' ry-on 
Am' phi-tus 
Am^jdiot'e-ras 
Am-phot-iy-o-ni' a- 

des 
Am-phr/sus 
Amp'sa-ga 
Am-pys'i-des 
Am' pyx 
Am-sac'tus 
A-mu' li-us 
A-myc/ fai 
A-myc'te 
Am'y-cus . 
Am'y-<ion 
Am-y-ino'ne 
A-myn' tas 
A-myn-ti-a'tiU8 
A-nq/ris 
A-myn'tor 
A-myr'i-us 
Am'y-nis 
A*mys'tis 
Arti-y-thti'on 
Am'y-tis 
An'a-ces 
An-ti-char' siis 
A-na'ci-um (10) 
A-nac're-on, or 



Skiff 



^9 



A-na' cre-o« \9Sj) ' 
An-ac-to'ri-a 
An-ac-to' ri-um 
f An-a-dy-am' e-flft 
A-nag' ni*a 
An-a-gy-Ton'tBiB 
An-a-i'tis 
An' a-phe 
An-a-pfalys'tQS 
A-na' pus 
A-nar tes 
A'nas (1) 
An'cho-ra 
A-nat' o-le 
A-nau' chi-dsls (1€) 
A-nad^iiu 
A'naK{l) 
An-ax-ag' o->ras 
An-ax-ai/ der 
An-ax-an' dri-^es 
An-ax-ar'chtts (Ift) 
An-ax-ai^ este 
An-iax-e''4ti6r 
A-riax'i-as (10) 
An-ax-ib'i-* ' 
An-ax-ic'ra-tek 
A^nax-i-Kla'mils' 
A-nax'r-Ias 
A-nax-i-la' us 
An-ax-il' i-des 
An-ax-i-man'der 
An-ax-im' e-n^ 
An-ax-ip'o-lis 
An-^x-ip'piis 
An-ax-ir'no-e 
A*nax'is 



* Ampkigema, — See Iphigemoj and Rule 30^ prefixed to this vocabiifoiy. 

t This epithet from the Greek tvHtHvu emergem^ ngnUying ruhig <mt of tiit 

Ijeater, is applied >to the picture of Vemis ruung out of the sea, as odgim^ 

-painted by Apelles, I doubt not that aomey who only hear this word wtthoiit 

steipgit written, t^ppoMit:tontail:4iiiis j;>«nitiit,tfieyear of oarliofd, * 



i 



' 10 



'AN 



A-ffloi'o 

Ad^ck' us 

Aii-ca-li' tes 

An-ca' ri-us 

An-cha'ri-a (7) 

Ao-cba' ri-us 

Au-chem' o-lus 

AD-cbe-Mi' tes 

Au -dies' mus 

An-chi'a-la 

An-chi' a-le 

An-chi'a-lus 

An-chi-mo'li-us 

An-chin'o-e 

An-chi'ses 

AB-chis'i-8(ll) 

An-chi-ai'a-des 

An'cho-e 

An-chu'rus 

An-ci'le 

Ad'cod 

An-co'iu 

An'cus Mar'ti-us 

Aa-cfle 

An-cyne 

An'th 

An-dab'a-tffl 

An-da'ni-a 

An-de-ca'vi-a 



AN 

Alt'llM 

Au-doc/ i-des 
Atl-dom'a-ti» 
Ao-drge' mon 
Aii-dra-ga'thi-us 
Au- drag's-! litis 
An-drag' o-ras 
An-draiii'j-tes 
An-dre'as 
Ait'drtw (Eng.) 
An'dri-clus 
Au'dri-on 
An-dris'cus 
An-dro' bi-us 
An-dro-cle'a 
An' dro-clea 
An-dio-cli' des 
An-dro' <:! us 
An-dro-c}'' dcs 
An-drod' a-mus 
An-dro'ge-os 
An-dro' ge-u3 
An-drog' y-nse 
An-drom'a-ciie 
An-drom-a-chi' doe 
An-drotn' a-chua 
An-drom'a-das 
An-drom'e-da 
An' dron 



■AN 

•An-dro-ni'cus (38) 

An-droph'a-^(3) 

An-dro-pom' pis 

An'dros 

An-dros'the-nes 

An-dro' tri-on 

An-e-ion' tis 

An-e-ras* tus 

An-e-mo' li-a 

An-e-mo'sa 

Aii-fiu'o-mu» 

An-ge" li-a 

Ao-ge' li-oa 

An' ge-luB 

An-gi' tes 

An' grits 

Aii-gu-it'i-a(ll)(24) 

A' ni-a (7) 

An-i-ce' tus 

A-nic'i-a(IO) 

A-iiic' i-um (24) 

A-nit/i-us GaFlu* 

An'i-grus 

A'lii-o, and A'nJ-en 

An-i-tor' gis 

A'ni-us 

An'na 

An-ni-a'flus 

An'ni-bal 



" Anirmdc-js.—'Tlns vrordii unlfonnly pronounced by onr profodiito with the 
penultimale accent and yet So averse isan English ear to placing the accent on 
the pcniiltiaiate i, that fay all English scholars we hear it placed upon the ante* 
pemiliiinate syllable. T\aX thU was the pronunciation of IhU word in Qneen 
£liz3beih1 time, appearsplainly from the tragedy of TitNi ^wlrMicw , sud to 
be written by Shnkipeare i[| which we every where find the antepenultimate 
proamdathm adopted. It may indeed lie qncslioned, whether Shakspeare'i 
learning extended to a knowledge of the quantity of this Gnecn-Latin word 
but, IS Mr. StcCTcns lias jiiitly ohserved, there is a greater number of classical 
aUnsionsio this plsy than are scattered over ail the' rett of the perfbrmanccs nn 
-which the teul-of Shaks|iearG JshidQbitably fixed; and Ibereforcitmay be pre- 
wuned that the author conid not be ignorant of tiie Greek and latin pronnncia- 
lioD of this word, but fbUowed Ihie received Engtiah pTonuncialion Mhis time ; 
and which by all bat profcMcd scbolir* is still continaed.— Sec SiijibwuM* 



AN 



AN 



AP^ 



11 



Aii'iu.bi(s)(4y \ 

An-oic'e-ris (24) 

An'non 

An-o-fMe' • 

An'ser 

An-sd-Wrwa 

An-tae'a 

An-to^as 

An-ta!^us 

Aiutag^ Doras 

An.tal' ci-das 

Ao-tan^der ^ 

An.tan'dros 

An-ter-bn/igi-as 

An-tei^us 

An.tem'me 

An-te^nor 

An-te-noi^i dcs 

An'te-ro8 

An-die^a 

An'die^as 

An-tbei'doa 

An-the^la 

An' tbe-mis 

An'tbe*inon 

An^ the-mus 

An-the»mu' si-a (10) 

An the' ne 

An-the/mus 

Ai/thes 

An-thes-ph(/ii-a 

An-thes'te'ri-a 

An'the-us 

An-thi'a 

All' thi-as 

Ao'thi-iim 

An'thi-us 

An'^o 

An-th</re8 

AiMhm'ci-a(lO) 



An-thro-pi'nusl 

An-thro-poph' a^ 

An-thyFia 

An-ti-a-ni' hi 

Ai/ti-as (10) 

An^ti-cie' a 

An' ti-cles 

An-ti-di'des 

An tic' ra-gu8 

An-tic'ra-tes 

An-tic'y-Ki 

Aiutid'o-tus 

An.tid'o-mtts 

An-tig'e-nes 

An-ti-gen'i-cias 

An-tig'o-iia 

An-tig' o-ne 

An-ti-m'ni-a 

An-tig^o-niis 

An-tiFco 

An-ti-lib'a-niu 

An-tiFo-dms 

An-tim'a-dius 

An-tifa'e-neB 

An-ti-noe'i-a(5) 

An-ti-noj/o-lis 

An-tin'o-us 

Aii-ti-</cIii*ay or 

*An-ti-ochi'a(29) 

Jn'ti'Och (Eng.) 

An-ti'o-chis 

An-ti'o-chus 

An-ti'ope(8) 

An-ti-o'rus 

An-tip'a-ter 

An-ti-pa'tri-a 

An-ti-pat'ri-das 

An-tip'a-tris 

An-tiph'a-nes 

An-tiph' a-tes 



j An-tipVi-lus 
I An' ti-phon 

An-ti(rfi'o-iiii9 

An'^ti-phus 

An-ti'poe'nus(5) 

An-tij/o-lia 

An-tis'sa 

An-tb'theHws 

An-tis'ti-us 

An-tith'e-us 

Au^ti-um (10) 

An-tom'e-nes 

An-to'ni^ 

An-to'ni-i (3) (4) 

An-to-ni'im 

An-to-ni' ni» 

An-to-niK^ o-Bs 

An-toi'ni-iiSy M* 

Ao-tor'i-il» 

A-nil'lns 

An'xi-ns 

An'xur 

Atfj-ta 

An'y-tU8 

An za'be (8) 

A-ob*ri-ga 

A-oFli-ua 

A'on 

A'o-aes 

A-o' ris 

A-or'nos 

A-o'ti 

A-pa'i tae 

A-pa'ina (7) 

A-pa' me (8) 

Apanne^a 

Ap-annKa 

A-pai^oi 

Ap-a-tu'ri^ 

Ap-e-ai/roa 



* ^fiH0dktc--fVirwoixbof tbipt^rBiinatHm^SM /f&%«iii<aiid Ne,30«rike 
Roles ifiefixed lo Udt Yoctlmlary, 



-i 



It 



AF- 



AP. 



xn 



A-pe la 

A-peF les 

A-pel' Ji-con - 

Ap-en-ni'nufi 

A'[fcr . 

Ap-e-ro'4)i-a 

Ap'e-sus 

Aph'arca. 

A-phae'a 

A'phar 

Aph-a'-re'ti|s 

Aph-a-re^us 

Alphas (1) 

A-pIiel'las 

ApVensas 

Aph'e-tae 

Ap)i' i-das <4; 

Aiphki'iia 

A-phid'puB 

Aph-oe-be'tua 
A-phri'ces (1) 
Aph-ro-dis'i«a 
Aph-ro-di^sum (1) 
Aph-ro-di' te (B) 
A-ph/fe(8) 

A'iM.a(l)(4)(7) 
A-pi-a' nus. 
Ap-i-ca'ta 
A-pic/i-us (S4) 
A-pid^ a-Dus 
Ap'i-na 
A-pi'o-la 
A'pi-on(l) 
A' pis r' 
A-pit^ i-|n (24) 



A-j^Wrtia'i^ * 
A-paUi-na^ris 
Ap-ol-lin't-des 
A-pol'li-nis 

A-pol'lo 

Ap-ol-loc'iH-tes 

A-pol-lo-do' nis 

Ap-ol-lo'm a 

Ap-ol-lo'ni-as 

A-pol-lo-ni'a-dcB 

Ap-ol-lon' i-d6s 

Ap-ol-la'ni-us 

Ap-ol-Iofrfi^a-'nefe; 

A-po-my-i'o8 

A-poiiii-a'iia(7) 

A-po'ni-iis, M. 

Ap'o-niis 

Ap-os-tro'phira 

*A-poth-c-o' sis . 

Ap'O-tMo-m 

Ap'pi^a Vi'fi* 

Ap-pi'a-des 

Ap-pi-*a'.iiu8 

Ap'pi-i Fo'nun 

Ap' pi-US 

Ap' p»-la 

A'pri-es 

A' pri^-us 

Ap*«m' ifai*i (4) 

Ap^'si-nins 

Ap'te-ra(20) 

•Ap-u-le'i^a 

Ap-u-le*i-os 

A-pu' li-a 

Ap-u-sid'a<^iiiiM 



A-qfitiMftiB 
Aq-<ii-'bfri*a 
Aq-ui-le' i-a 
A-quil'i-iis 
A-quiFli-a 
Aq'ui-liv 
Aq-ui-lo'ni-a 
A-quin'i-us 
A-qui^num 
Aq-ui-ta'ni-ti 
A'ra (17) 
Ar-a-bar'idtei 
A-ra'bi-a 
A-ndb'i'^ttB 
At' a-bis • 
Ar'abs • 
Ar'a-bus 
A-nu/iia -dr 
A-rec'ca 
A-rach'ne 
Ar-a-cho'si-a 
Ar-a-cho't» 
Ar-a-cho' ti 
A-rac^tbi^as 
Ar-a-cil'him 
Ar-a-co'ri4 (4) 
A^c-k-^ejvtikm (4) 
A/a-dus 
A'r«(l7> 
iA'rar(17) 
Ar^a^ros 
iAr-a-Hiyi'eni 
lA-ra'ttts » 
A-rax'es 
(Ar-ba'ceSy w ' 



* ApoiheotU.-^^fttie!ti n^e are reading Latin or i&reek, this w«rd ong^t to have 
the accent on the jHnmltiiitate sylUible ; but in pronouncing English we fhouri 
accent thffaAf effta^tilnatjie : 

Allots the prince of his celestial line . 

*"■'" An il|>o<&tfom and rites divine.*-: — Garth. . . 



AS 



AR 



AR 



«^ 



*Ai'ba-cca« 
Ar-be'Ia . 
fAi^be-la 
AFbis : 
Ar-bo-caMa 
Ar-bus' cu-la 
Ar-caf <U-8 . 
Ar-ca' &-uf 
Ar-ca'nitta 
Ai^cas 
Ar' ce-na 
Ar'cens. 
Ar.ces i-Wiia 
Ar-ce' sitUft (10) 
Ar-chae' a 
Ar-olni' A-nax 
Ar-chsBHatfiidBs 
Arch-ag^a-tkus 
Ar-cbaof der 
Ar-clian' dcos 
Ardi«(l^) 
Ar-cheg'e-tes (^4) 
Ar-che-la'us • 
Ar'chsm'a-dius 
Ar-chem^orms 
Ar-chep' o-lis 
Ar-chq>»tore-mu8 



Ar-ches' tra^tus 
Ar-che-ti'mtis 
Ar-che' tf-Ms (10> 
Ar'chb.a 
Ar' chinas 
Ar-chirbi^a-d^s (4) 
Ar-chib'i-us 
Ar-chi-daf mi-a ('29) 
lAr^chi-da'mus, or 
Ar-chid' a-miui 
At' chi-das 
Ar-chi.d6i^ mus 
Ar-chi-de'u» 
Ar-chid' i-um 
Ajrchi-gal'liw 
Ar-chig' e-nes 
Ar-chil' o-cus 
Ar-chi-me';def 
Ar-chi' nus 
Ar-ohi-pic^ a-gus- 
Ar-chip' o-lia 
Ar-chip'pe . 
Ar-chip'pus 
Ar-chi'tis 
Ar'chon 
Ar-choii'te& 
Ar'chy-lus (6) 



4 

Ar'chy-tas 
Arc -ti^ nus 
Arc-teph'y-bx 
Arc'toi 
Arc-to' us 
Arc-ti/rus 
Ar' da-lus 
Ar-da'ni-a 
Ar-daxWnus 
Ar' de-a 
Ar-de-a' tes 
Ar-de-ric'ca 
Ar-di-ae' r (4) 
Ar-do'ne-a 
Ar-du-en'na 
Ar-du-i' ne 
Ar-dy-en' S€% 
Ar' dys 
A»re-ac' i-d« 
A-re'a 
A' re-as 
A-reg'o-nis 
Ar-e-la'tum 
A-rel'li-H8 - 
Ar-e-mor'i-ca 
A're . 
A-re' te 



* ! ■ 



•mtf 



ir^ 



* i4r&«i«t,.i--JUlBpri«99vOoi]ldiiian9 Qesiierf iui4 I^ttleton, accent tbia^cM 
•n the first ayUnMiB* \s%X iMofwortb and Holyoke oi^ltie second- ; and lliii^ is s» 
much qooic agrff^lA^ to fi^ £ngy|li far, thai I shonld prefer it, ;1iioug^ I hav^ 
out of reflj^t tp i^it^qsitles, inserted th^ otlier» tliiit tlie reader, my cbooia 
iffaich he pleases, Labbe has not got this word. 

♦ 4fM%, Ibf <^ty of Afttytaa, where the decisive battle was loi^t. between 
khmfi^ aad Ha^, and the city in Palestine of thkt name, have the aooanf 
911/the pannlto^ter bat 4Ada^ a t»wa in Sicily, has the accent <m th^atfte^ 
penultimate .igrHahle. . : . I 

^ ilfvim|aaiiit.-«»Aloswartii, taoal4inan» Littleton and H^yeke, plaaa Ae iur- 
ttsat^ thjaant^yfonithBata sylUUo of tiiis ward, bat Lempnere and Labbh4HJ 
tha pawdliiati Ihane Mowed Lemprifm and l4abbe, though, in^f^^ 
nioa, wa«Bg: '^ fi>r«s»eveiy woadof 4his tenninatioa has Hw antei^Mltiaiiteiie? 
eanty as f^ t lydua ii w^ neaAMMs^^e.' Xkaow aoC whgr thissboifld be diifi^e^;' 
Thoogh Labba tells us, tetthalaaiwadara^f hasopiaioa, . • ^'^r* -» 



14 



AR 



AR 



AR 



A-ren' a-ciim 
Arc€-op-a-gi' tm 
*Ar-e-op'a-gus 
A-res'tae 
A-reai^tha-nas 
A-res-toi^i-des 
A're-ta 
Ar-e-He^ns 
Ar-e-taph' i-la 
Ar-e-ta' les 
A-re' te 
A-re'tc« • 
Ar-^-thu' sa 
Ar-e-ti'num 
Ar'e-tus 
A' re-US 

Al'ga-lus 

Ar^th'o.na 

Ar-ga-tho'ni us 

Ai'ge (9) 

Ar-ge'a 

Ar-ge-a'thsB 

Ar-gen^qum 

Ar'ges 

Ar-^esi'tra-lus 

Ar-ge'us 

Ai^gi(9)(3) 

Ar-g?« 

Ar^^-«s 

Ar-gi-le^tiiin 

Ar-gil^i-tts 



Ar-giKIus 

Ai^ gi-ius 

Ar.gi-nu'sse 

Ar.gi'o-pe 

Ar-gi-pbon'tes 

Ar-«ip'pc-i(3) 

Ar-giva 

Ar-gi'vi (3) 

fAr^^gives (Eog.) 

Ar'gi-us 

Ai^go 

Ar-gol'i-cus 

Af'go-Iia 

Ar' gon 

Ar-go-nau'tae 

Ar-go'us 

Ar'gus 

Ar-gyn'Dis 

Ar'gy-ra^ 

Ar-gy-ras' -pi-Hes 

Ar'gy-re 

Ar-gyr' i-pa 

A' ri-a 

A.ri-ad'ne 

A.ri-ae'us 

A-ri-a'ni, 6r 

Aji-e'ni 

A-ri-an'tas 

A-ri-am' ne$ 

A-ri-a-ra'thes 

Ar-ib-bae'us (5) 

A-ric'i-a(«4) 



Ar-i-ci'na 
Ar-i-de^us 
A-riV MP 
Ar-iVum 
A-ri'i (4y 
Ar'i-ma 
Ar i-mas'pi (3) 
A^'i-mas^pi-as 
Ar-i-mas' that 
Ar-i-ma' zes 
Ar' itmi (3) 
A-rim' i-num 
A-rim' i-niis 

Af-im-pWi 

Ar' i-mus 

A-ri-o-bar-za'ne8 

A-ri-o man'des 

A-ri-o-niar'du» 

A-ri-o^ me' des 

Ari'on(28) 

A-ri-b-vis'tus(21) 

A'ria 

\-ris'ba 

Ar-is-taen'e-tus 

Ar-is-tag'um 

Ar-w-tafe'us 

Ar-ia-tag'o-ras 

Ar-is-tan' der 

Ar-is-tan' dros 

Ar-b-taf' che 

Ar-is-tar'chus 

Ar-is-ta-za'nes 



* Ar99p9gvM,—ljaLhhe tells as, that the penultimate syllable of tiiis word is be- 
yond all ooBtroversy short,— Hjnidqoid nounulli in tanti luce etia m nO m caecnti- 
aat— fiomeof these blind men are, Oouldoian, HolyokOt and Littleton ;-— but 
Len^Mriere and Ainswortb, the best authoriti^y agree with Labb^ 

t ArgiiMi. — I have observed a strong propensi^ in school-boys to pnmonnce 
the IT in tk^ woirdshard, as in the English wofd gwe. This is, nodoolMedlyy be- 
CMae their naasters do so ; and they will tell os, that the Ctareek gttmmm s^nld 
ahiayt beiuonounced hard in words from that language. What* then» mmt iffe 
iiltier tliat long cataiogne of words where this le^r 9e€va[»f «Hi ia Gemrii^gtniMh 
IMvMcs^ JE'g^i'tttf) &c.?--~Th€ qiiestion answeni 



A-ris'te-M 


Ai-'a-tatfe-ia 


Ar-san-oWbi 


A-ris'te-re , - 


Jr'U-to-tle (Ei^.) 


Ar-sa'iMi 


Arig'to-us 


Ar-is-to-ti'raua 


Artafoi-M 


A-rifi'tbe-ueB 


AHs-tox'e-niis 


Ar^na " 


A-r»'thw 


A-ris' tua 


A/!^ 


Ar-iB-ti'bitt 


■Ar-is-tjl'iui 


Ar'si-a 


Ar-ia-ti'dea 


A'ri-ua 


Ar-si-dse'ils 


Ar-i.-tip'pu» 


A/me-iiea 


Ar-siii'o-e 


A-m'ti-us 


Ar-me'tii-a 


Ar-ta-ba'niu 


A-ria'ton 


Ar-men-ta'ri-Us 


Ar-ta-ba'zu» 


Ar-w-to-bu'ia 


Ar-miJ'la-«ia 


Ar'ta-bri (3) 


Ar-is-to-bu' lua 


Ar-mi- ills' tri-um . 


Ar-ta-bri't£e 


Ar-w-to-cle'a 


Ar-min'i-us 


Ar-ta-cffi'as | 


A-ris'to-des 


Ar-nior'i-c.E . 


Ar-la-cas'na 


A-ris-tocii'des 


Ar'ne (8) 


Ar'ta-ce 


Ar is-toc'ta-tes 


A.^iii(3> .,- 


Ar-ta-ce'iie 


Ar-is-to' ere -on 


Ar-no'bi-ns . 


Ar-ta'ci-a 


Ar-ifl-toc'n-nis 


Ai'nus 


Ar-ue-i (3) 


A-ris to-de'mus 


AKo-a 


Ar-tag'e-m 


Ar-is-tog'c-aes 


Ai'o-m. - 


Ar-ta-ger'ses 


Ar-is-to-gi'toii 


Ar'pa-Di 


Ar-ta'nes 


Ar-is-to-Ia' m 


Ar'pi(3) 


Ar.ta-pher'nes 


Ar-ia-tom'a-iJie 


Af-pi'num 


Ar-.ta'tus. 


Ar-is-tom'a-chus 


Ar-ra!'i(3) 


Ar-ta-vaB'de» 


Ar-is-to-me'des 


Ar;rah-b«'u8 


Ar-tax'a 


Ar-is-tom'e nes 


Arri-a 


Ar-tBi'i-aa 


A-ris-to-iiau'tEB 


Ar-ri-a'nus 


Ar-tax'a-ta 


Ar-is-to-oi'cus 


Ai'ri-us 


Ar-ta-xerjt'es 


A-ris' to- nus 


A'ri-us 


Ar tax'i-as 


Ar-is-ton'i-des 


Ar-run'ti-iu (10) 


Ar-tajc'tes 


Ar-is-lon'y-mus 


Ar-sa'ces 


Ar-ta-jn'ta 


Ar-is-toph'a-nes 


•Ai'aa.ces, or 


Ar-ta-yn'tes ' 


A - ris-to - phi -1i' det 


Ar-aa'bes 


Ar-tem-ba'res 


A-rls'to-phon 


Ar-sac'i-dae 


Ar-tem-i-di/rua 


A-ri§'tor 


Ar-sam'e-n« 


fAr'te-mia 


Ar-u-toi'i-des 


Ar-sam'e-tes 


Ar-te-xnis'i-a(ll) 



* Anata.—GonUomt, Lempnere, Holyoke, ind Lnbbc, icceot this woi4 
n Sm Bnt lyllable, and uoquestioiubly not vrilhaot classical antbwit; ; bat 
AnmrorO, iM'a ititlgreateraiitliority, general luage, Mre, ia nij opiiiloa, 
'ctHMiacd th« acMBt «f Has word od the second eylkblr. 

t 4rtMih— The drtci* to Apollo tune their nncc, 

Aad AiUmit M DtM-iriiBBi dvti nijoice. 



t« 



AS' 



Ar-te-mia' i-4m 

*Ar-te-mi' U 

Ar' te-mo» 

Arth'ini-uB 

Ar-le'na 

i^-tim' pa-sa 

Ar-to-bar-za' nei 

Ar-toch'mes 

At-to'Da 

Ar- ton' tea 

Ai-Wm-aa 

Ar.tox'a-re» 

Ar-to' ri-iiB 

Ar-t^net 

Ar-^'n' i-» 

Arljs'to-nft 

Ar'u-ae 

A-ru'ci 

Ar-va'lei 

A-ni'e-ris 

Arvei'ii! 

Ar-vii'a-gui 

Ar-vis'i-um 

Ar-vi'giiB 

A'rum(l) 

A-niii'ti-ua<10) 

Ar-u-pi'nus 

Arx'a-ta 

Ar-y-an' des 

Ar'y-bas 

Ar-yp-tae" us 

A'San'dOT 

As-ba-me'a 

As.b«>'tw 

As* bo-Iua 

Ai-li^VtK 

Asrcafa-pbua 

As'^-lon 

As-m' i4-» 



AS. . 

As-ca' u-iu 

Asc/iCS), 

As-cla'pi-a 

A9-cle-[M'a-dea 

As-cle-pi-o-do'ru8 

As-cle-pi-o-do' his 

Aa-Gle'pi-uB 

As-cle-ta' ri-on 

Af^cliu 

As-co^li-B 

As-ctyni-iu Lu'be-o 

Ai'cra 

Ai'cu-lum 

As'dru-bal 

A sel'li-o 

A'8i-a(10)(ll) 

A-si-al'i-cu! 

A-ri'las 

As-i-na' ri-a 

As-i-na' ri-u* 

As-i-na 

As'j-ne 

As'i-nes 

A-Bio'i-us Gal' Ins 

A'8i-us(Il) 

As-na'iu 

A-so' phis 

A-so'pi-a 

As-o-pi' a-des 

A-ap'pis 

A-so* pus 

As-pam'i-thres 

As-pa-ra'gi-um 

As-pa'si-a(n) 

As-pa-«i'nis 

As -pas' tea 

As-pa-thi' nea 

As-pm' diB 

As' pis 



AS . 

As-ple'don 
''As-poTe'iuis^4) 
As'sa 

As-sa-bi nits 
As-sar' a-cus 
As-se-ri' ni (3) 
As'so-ruB 
As' SOS 
Aa-sjr'i-a 
As'ta 

As-ta-coe'ni (4). 
As* ta-cua 
As'ta- pa 
As' ta-pus 
As-lar' te (8) 
As'ter 
As-te'ri-a 
As-te' ri-on 
As^te'ri-us 
As-te-ro'dj-a 
Aster' o-pe 
As-te-ro'pe-a 
As-ter-o-p«'iis 
As-ler-u'si-us (ll)i 
As-tiu'o-me 
As-ti'o-chiis 
As'to-mi (3) 
As-trie'a 
As-itk'us 
As'ta 
As'tur 
As' tu-ra 
Anu-res 
As.tj' a-ge 
As-t/a-ges . . 

As-^a-lus 
A«-tj' a-nax 
As-ty-cra'ii-a (10)_ 
As-tyd' a-mas 



* Arleoata, — Aimivortb placet ilje accent ud llic antepenultimate lyQiible of 
this word; but Ltmpriere, GouldoiaD, and Holjoki, i^dk (orrectly, tn ny 



AT 



AT 



AU 



t7 



As-ty-da-mi'a (30) 

A^ty-lus 

As-^m-e-du'sa 

As-t}ii'orme 

As-tvii'o-^ini 

As-tyn'o-us 

As-ty'o-che 

As-ty-ipHchi'a (30) 

As-ty-pa-lae'a 

As-typh'i-lus 

As-t/ron 

As'y-chis 

A-sylas 

A-^i1iis 

A-tab\i-lii8 

At-^-b/ris 

At-a-by-ri'te (6) 

At'a-ce(8) i 

At-a-lan'ta 

At-^-ran'tes 

A-tar'beHchis (1 1) 

A-ta/ga-tis 

A-tai-'ne-a 

A^tas, and A'thas 

A'tax 

A'te (8) 

A-teFla 

Al^e-na - 

At-e-no-ma'rus 

Ath-a-ma'nes 

AtliVmsis 

Ath-a-man-ti'a-des 

Ath-a-na'si-us ( 10) 

Ath'a-nis 

A'the-as 

A-the^na 

A-lhe'nae (8) 

Ath-e-nae'a 

Ath-e-nje'um 



Ath-e-na/tis 

Ath-e-iM^o-ras 

Ath-eW-is 

A-the'ni-on 

A-thei/o-cles 

Atli-en-o-do'nis 

A'the-os 

Ath'e-sis 

A'thos(l)^ 

Ath-rulla 

A-thym'bra " 

A.ti''a(li; 

A-ta'i-a 

A.til'i-us 

A-tUla 

A-ti'na 

A-ti'nas 

A-tin'i-a 

At-lan'tes 

At-lan-ti'a-des 

At-lan'ti-des 

At'las 

A-toj/sa 

At'ra-ces 

At-ra-myt'ti-um 

At'ra-pes 

A'trax(l) 

At-re-ba'tae 

*At-re-ba'tes 

At-re'ni 

As're-us 

A-tri'dae 

A-tri'des 

A-Wni-us 

At-ro-pa-te'ne 

At-ro.pa'ti-a(ll) 

At'ro-po»(19) 

At'ta 

At-ta'li-a 



-J 



At'ta-lus 

At-tar'ras 

At-te'i-us Capiat© 

At'tes 

At^this 

At'ti-ca 

At'ti-cus 

At-ti-da'tei 

At'ti-la 

At-til'i-us. 

At-ti'nas 

At'ti-us Pe-Ug'nus 

At-u-atl-ci (4) 

A'tu-bi (3) 

A-tya-dse 

A'tys(l) 

Av-a-ri'cum 

Arvel'la 

Av-en-ti'mis 

A-ver'nus, or 

A-ver'jia 
A-ves'ta 
Au-fe'i-a a'qua 
Au-fi-de'oa 
Au-fid'i-a 
Au-fid'i-us 
Au'fi-dus 
Au^ga, and Au^ge 
Au^e'a 
Au'ga-rus 
Au'ge-ae 
Au'gi-aS) and 

Au'ge-as 
Au'gi-lse 
Au-gl'nus 
Au'gii-res 
Au-giis'ta 
Au-gus-ta^i-a 
Au-gns-ti'nus 



* AtrAotes. — ^Ainfwottli acceiita this word on th« antepenultimate syllable ; 
but Lempriere, Gouldman, Hoiyoke> and Labbe> on tli% penultimate ^ and * 
id, iu my opinioni the better pronnnciation. 



X9 



AXf 



AU 



AZ 



Au'gusttifiy (Eng.) 
Aa-gus'tu-lna 

A-yid-i-e'nus 

A-Vid'i-us Cas^4i*fi8 

Av-i-e'nus 

A'vi-um 

Au-les'tes. 

Au-le'tes 

Aulis 

Au'lon 

A^4o^Ki-ll9 

Aulus. 

Au'ras 

Au-re'li-a 

Au-re-li-a'nusi 

Au-refli-fin, (Eog^) 

Au-reli-us 

Au-re'o-ljuft 
Au-ri'gO; 
Aii-rin'i-a, 
AurTo^ra 



Au-nm'ce (B) 
Au-riHi'^u-ie'i-u8 
Aus-chi^sa9 (12), 
Aus'ci (3) 
Au'ser : 

Au'se{-ri3 

Au'ses 

Au'son 

Au-so'ni-a 

Au-so'ni-iis 

Au'spi-ce*. 

Aus'ter 

Aus-te'si-on 

Au-to-bnlus, or 

A.-a-bu'lu8 

Au-ta-ni'tis 

Au-toch'tho-nes . 

Au'to-cles 

Aus-toc'r^-tes 

Au-to-cre'ae.(8) 

Au-toFo-tl» 

Au-tol'y-cus 



Au-tom'a-te 

Au-tom'e-don 

Au-to-me-du^sa 

Au-tom'e-nes 

Au-tom'o-li 

Au-ton'o-e 

Au-toph-ra-da'tes 

Au-xe'si^a (II) 

Ax'e-nus 

Ax-i'o-cfeus 

Ax-i'on (29) 

Ax-i-o-ni'cu» (30) 

Ax-i-o'te-a 

Ax-i-o'the-a 

Ax'i-us 

Ax'ur, and An'xur 

Ax'us 

A'zan (1) 

A-zi'ris 

A/o-nax 

A-2o'ru»(ll) 

A-zo'tus 



99mSS9fKS!m 



I. . t iiu iiic sa» 
BA 



BA 

Ba^bil^i-us 

BaM-lus 

Bab^y-Ion 

Bab-y-lo^ui-a, 

Bab.y.l#'ow (4) 

Ba-byr'sa 

Ba-byt'a-ce 

Bac-a-ba'sug 

Bac^'chs 

Ba^-cha-nali-a 

Bac-ch^i'tes 

Bac'chi (3) 

Bac-cfai'a-ds 

Bac/chi-dcs 

Bac^chib 



BA 

Bac'chi-uQi 

Bac^chi-tUA 

Bac'chus 

Bac^hyFi-des 

Ba-ce^nis 

Baucis 

Bac^tra 

Bac'tri, and 

Bac-tri->a'ni (4) 
Bac-tri-a'na 
Bac^tros 
Bad'a-ca 
Ba'di^ 
Ba^di-us 
Bad-u-hti/nar 



Bse'bi-us, M. 

Bae'tis 

Bae'ton 

Ba-gjs^ta-m^ 

Bargls'Ui*ues 

Bargofaa, aod 

!Bd-go^sas 
Bag-o-da'res 
Ba-gophVuQS 
Bag'ra-da 
Ba'i.« 
Ba'Ia 
Ba-la^CFus 
BaI-a-na'gr9P 
Ba^-la'nus 



BA 

Ba-la'ri 

Bal-biTIua . 

Bal-bi'nus 

Bal'bus 

Bal-e-a'rea 

Ba-le'tua 

Ba^Ii-ua 

Ba-lis'ta 

BaUon'o-ti (3) 

Bal-ven'ti-us (10) 

BaFy-ras 

Bam-u-ru^ae 

Baii'ti-ae (4) 

Ban'ti-us, L. (10) 

Baph'y-nis (6) 

Bap'tie 

Ba-rae'i 

Bai^a-thrum 

Bar'ba-^ri 

Bar-^-ba^ri-a 

Bar-bos'the-nea 

Bar-bytVa-ce 
Bar'ca 
Bar^ca^i, or 

Bar'ci-tae 
Bar'ce 
Bai^cha 
Bar-daB^i 
Bar'di 
Bar-dyl'lis 
Ba<^re'a 

Ba^re*as ScHra^oui 
Ba'res 

Bar-gu'sw (3) 
Ba-ri'ne 
Ba-ris^ses 



BaVi-um 

Bar^nu-us 

Bar-si^ne, and 

Bar-se'ne 

!^ar-za-en'tes. 

Bar-za'nes 

Bas-i-le'a 

Bas-i-li'da& 

Bas-i-li'des . 

Ba-sil-i-o-pot/a-mos 

Bas^i-lis 

Ba-sil'i-us (31) 

Bas'i-lus 

Bas^sae 

Bas-sa'ni-a 

Bas-saWua 

BasWris 

Bas^sus Au-fid'i-us 

Bas-tar'ioae; and 

Bas-tei^nae 

Bas'ti-a 

Ba'ta 

Ba-taVi 

Ba'thos 

Bath'y-cles 

Ba-thyllus 

Bat-Wtus 

Ba't-ia(ll) 

Ba-ti'na, and 

Ban-ti\ia 
Ba'tis 
Ba'to 
Ba'ton 
Bat-ra-cho-my-o-* 

mach^i-a 
Bat-tiVdes 



Bfi 19 

Baftb 

Bat^tus 

Bat^u-Ium 

Bat^u-lus 

Ba-tyFlus 

Bau'bo 

Bau^cis 

Ba'vi-us 

Bauli (3) 

Baz-a-en^tes . 

Ba-za'ri-a 

Be^bi-U9 

Be-bri'a*K:um 

Beb'ry.ce(B> 

Peb'ry-ces>. ludd 

Be-bnrc'i-i (4) 
Be-brycl-a 
Bel-e-mi'na 
Bel-e-phaOr'tea 
BeKe-sia 
Bergse 
Bel%i-ca 
BeFgi-um 
Bel%i-us 
Bel'i-des, plvrat, 
Be-]i^deS| singular,. 
Be-lisVma 
Bel-i-sa'ri-us 
Bel-is-ti^da 
BeVi-tSB 
Bel-ler'o-phott 
BeUe'rus * 
Bel-li-e'nua 
Bel-lo'na 
BeUo-na'ri-i (4) 
Bel-lo/a-ci 



* BeUerus^ — AH our lexicographers anitein giving this word the antepenult* 
mate accent : but Milton seems to hav^ sanctioned the penultimate^ as mucUi. 

aiprc agreeable to English ears, in his Xycidas 

0» whether thoa ta our moist vows deny'd' 
Sleep'st by the &ble of BWkrM old. 

C.% ^ Thou^' 



» 



BI 



bl 



BO 



Bel-lo-ve'sus 

Be'lon 

Be'lus 

Be-na'cu5 

Ben-e-did'i-um 

Ben'dis 

Ben-e-ven'tum 

Ben-the-sic'y-me 

Be-pol-i-ta'niis 

BerT>i-caB 

Ber-e-cyn'thi-a 

Ber-e-ni'ce (30) 

Ber-e-ni'cjs 

Ber'gi-on 

Ber-gis'ta-ni 

Be'ris, and Ba'ris 

Ber'mi-us 

Ber'o-e 

Be-rce'a 

Ber-o-ni'ce (30) 

Be-ro'sus 

Ber-rhoe'a 

Be'sa 

Be-sid'i-ae 

Be-sip'po 

Bes'si (3) 

Bes'sus 

Bes'ti-a 

Be'tis 

Be-tu'ri-a 

Bi'a 

*Bi-a'nor 

Bi'as 

Bi-bacVlus 

Bib'a-ga 



BibOi-a, and BiHi-a 

BMis 

Bib-li'na 

Bib'lus, 

Bi-brac'tc 

Bib'u-lus 

Bi'ces 

Bi'con 

Bi-cor'ni-ger 

Bi-cor'nis 

Bi-for'miai 

Bi'frons 

Bil'bi-lis 

Bi-ma'ter 

Bin%i-um 

Bi'on 

Bir'rhus 

Bi-sal't» 

Bi-sal'tes 

Bi-sal'tis 

Bi-san'the 

Bis'toii 

Bis'to-iiis 

Bi'thiis 

Bith'y-as 

Bi-thyn'i-a 

BM-as 

Bi'ton 

Bi-tu'i-lus 

Bi-tun'tuiii 

Bi-tur'i-ges 

Bi-tur'i-ciim 

Biz^i-a 

Blffi'na 

Bl^si-i (4) 



Blae'sus 

Blan-de-no'iia 

Blan-du'si-a 

Blas-to-phoe-ni'ces 

Blem'my-es 

Ble-ni'na 

Blit'i-us (10) 

Blu'ci-um (10) 

Bo-a-dic'e-a 

Bo'ae, and Bo'e-a 

Bo-a%ri-us 

Bo-ca'li-as 

Boc'car 

Boc'cho-ri» 

Boc'chus 

Bo-du'ni 

Bo-du-ag-na'tu* 

Boe-be'is 

Boe'bi-a 

Bo-e-dro'ni!-a 

BiB-o-tai^cha 

Boe-o'ti-a 

Boe-o'tus 

Boe-or-o-bis'tai 

Bo-e'lhi-u8 

Bo'e-tus 

Bo'e-us 

Bo'ges 

Bc/giid 

Bo'gus 

Bo'i-i (3) 

Bo-joc'a-lus 

Bo'la 

Bi>Kbe 

Bol-bi-ti'niun 



Thongh it must be acknowledged tliat Milton lias in this word deserted the clas- 
fical pronunciation, yet his authority is sufficient to make us acquiesce in his ac* 
centuation in the above-mentioned passage. 

* Bianoi\ — Lempriere accents this word on the first syllable: but Labbe» 
,Ainiworth, Gouldman, aid Hoi|yoke> on tfa« second •, and these agree with \ir. 



BR 

Bol'gi-us. 
Bo-Ii' na 
Dol-i-tiffi'iia 

Bo-US' BUS 

Bo]~la'DU3 

Bo'lua 

Bom-i-ei/sei 

Bo-inil' car 

Boni-o-ni' ce (30) 

Bo-tK/ni^ 

Bo-no' si-US 

Bo-ru/zbe-ia 

Bo-o-au'rE 

Bo-o'tes 

Bo-o'tu3, and 

B*.b' o-tus 
Bo' re-a 
Bo-re' a-Je3 
Bo're-as 
B(>-te-Qa'mi (3) 
Bo' re-US 
Bor'ges 
Bor-go' (fi 
Bor'nos 
Bor-up' pa 
Bo'nis 

Bo-i^s' the-nes 
Bos'pho-rus 
Bot'ti-a 
Bot-ti-ae' is 
Bo-vi-a'nuin 
Bo-vil' i» 
'Bracli-ma' nes 
Bne' si-a 
Bran'chi'a-des 
Bran' chi-diB 
Brao-chyl' li-des 
Bra'^-te 
Bras' i-<k9 
Bras-inle' i-a 
Brau' re 



Bmu'ron 


Bry-gea 


Bren'ni, and 


Br/8.(3)(5) 


Breu'ni 


Bry-aa-. 


BrcD'ous 


Bu-fca-aCiK 


Bren'the 


Bii-Wces 


Bra/ei-. 


Bu'ba-ria 


Brel'ti-i(3) 


Bu-baa-tfa-cat 


Bn-a're-iu 


Bu'ba-«ia 


Brrm 


Bu'bon 


Bri-gan'tes 


Bu-cepii'aJa 


Bng-^-ti'niii 


Bu<epli-a-liia 


Bri'mo 




Bri-se'is 


Bu-€0]'i-CUlB : 


BrTta 


Bu-co'li-on 


Bri-se'u3 


Bu'co-lua 


Bri-tan'm 


Bii'di-i(3) • 


Bri-tan'ni-a 


Bu-di'iii (3) 


Bri-l»n'iii-ciij(30) 


Bu-do'ram 


Brit-OHuar'tis 


Bu'lia 


Brit-o-ma'rU9 


Bol-la'ti-ua (10) 


*Bi il' o-nes 


Bo'.K^i 


Bris-el'liiin 


Bu'uua 


Brix'i-a 


Bu'poJu, 


Bri'iO 


Bu'pfaa-giia 


Broc-u-be'liu 


Bo-pho'ni-a 


Bro' mi-u3 


Bu-pra'ai-um 


Bm'inu. 


Bu'ra 


Bron'tes 


Bu-ra'i-cua 


BroQ-ti'DUs 


Bui'rhua 


Bro'te-aa 


Bu/a. 


Bro'the-us 


Biir'ai-a 


Emc' te-ri (4) 


Bu'aa 


Bru-ma'li-a 


Bu-a-rU 


Briin-du'si-um 


Bu't. 


Bni-tid'i-u> 


Bu'te-o 


Bru'ti-i (4) 


Bu-lea 


Bm' tu-liis 


Bu-thro'tum 


Bru'tus 


Bu-thyKe-iia 


Bry'aa 


Bu'lo-a 


Bry-ax'U 


Bu'loa 


Biyce 


Bu-toi'i-dea 



■ BrilDiKi.— Labbe talk <u, that this word a Munetiincs ffKiDQau:c& 
yannUinatt-Bcceiil, but stox* ftcqiwattj wilii 'Sw w,\K)(*nsAltat«x«. 



BV 



Bu-tun' turn 


Byb'Ii-i(4) rByz-a»-ti'a-ca» 


Bu'tus 


Bjb'li. 


By-zan'ti-um 


Bu-zj-ge" 


BjUi'o-oei 


By-zas 


Byb-le'»i-a,and 


Bvr'rbus 


By-ze'Dua 


Bj-bai-tf-a 


Bjyu 


Byz-e-ras 


Bjb'ii-. 


By-za'ci-iim 


Bjz'i-a 


CM 


cm 


C\ ■ 


Ca-an'thu« 


Caxil-i-a'iiul 


Ca5-8</nt-u» 


CaVa-des (20) 


CB-cil'i-i(4) 


Cajl'o-brix 


Cab'a-lei(20) 


Csc-i-lm 


Cxfu-lum 


Ca-bal'i-i(4) 


Cie-ciri-m 


Ca/yx 


Cab-al-li'num 


Ca)-ci'naTWcUB 


Ca-ga' CO 


Cab-a-lfnua 


Cwc'a-bim 


Ca-i-ci'nua 


Ca-bai'iioa 


Oc-u-lna 


Ca-i'ciia 


CSi-baVara 


€«-*£■ i-us (10) 


Ca-i-e'bi 


Ca-baVlM<4) 


CWli-a 


Ca'i-us, MdCa'i^ 


Ca-bi-ni 


Ca>'li-U! 


Ca'i-us 


Ca-bKri (3) 


C^m' a-ro 


Cal'ab-er, Q. 


CaJ)ii'i-a 


Cs-ne 


Ca-la'bri-. 


Ca-bu'ra(7) 


Caj'ne-us 


Cal'a-b™ 


Cab'u-nis (20) 


Cam'i-des 


Cal-a-gur-m'a-ilj 


Ca'c. 


Cit-iii'iia 


Cal'a-is 


Cach'a-les (20) 


Cai'iii 


Ca-kg'u-lis 


Ca'cuj 


Casnot'ro-pai 


Cal'a-mis (20) 


Ca-cu'tbis 


Ca^pi-o 


Cal-.-mi'sa 


Ca-cip'a-ris 


Cie-ra'tus 


Cafa-mos 


Ca'cii(3) 


Cai' re, ores' res 


Cal'a-niiii(20> 


CaJ-me-a 


Ca,Ke-si(3) 


Ca-la'nua 


Cad-rae'U 


Ca^-aar 


Ciil'a-on 


Cacfmus 


Caa-a-re-a 


Cal'a-ria 


Ca'dia(7) 


Cse-sa'ri-oli 


Cal-a-iha'ia 


,Ca-du'«-m (10) 


Ca^^j'oa 


Ca-la'thi-on 


Ca-dut'.i (3) 


Cat-sen' ni-as 


Cal'a-lhus 


Ca-dus'ci 


0»-ie'ti-iis (lO) 


Cal'a-tes (20) 


Cad'y-li. 


Cw'si-a(lO) 


Ca-la'b-a 


Cai'. (7) 


Cas' si-US (10) 


Ca-la'ti-*(10) 


Ca/ci-a.(10) 


Cai'so 


Ca-la'vi-i(4) 


Cli-d/'/-» 


Ca!-so'iii-l 


Ca-U'n-us 



CA 

Cal-au-re'a, and 
Cal-au-ri'a 

Car bis 

CaTce 

Cal'chaa 

Cal-che-do' ni-a 

Cal-chiii'i-a(12) 

Cal'dus Cse'li-uB 

Ca'le 

Cal-e-do' ni-a 

Ca-le* nuB 

Ca'les 

Ca-le'si-ufi (10) 

Ca-le' tie 

Cal'e-t(^(20) 

Ca'lex 

Cal-i-atf ne 
■ Ciil^-ce'di 

Ca-liJi-ua, M. 
' Ca-Iig-u-ia, C. 

Cal-i-pus 

Ca'lis 

Gal-lies' cJims 

CaWa'i-ci (4) 

Cal'las 

Cal-la-te'lHu 

Cal-le-te'ri-a 

Cal-le' ni 

CaKIi-a 

Cal-li'a-d^s 

Cal'li-as 

Cal-lib'i-u8 

Cal-Ii-ce'rus 

Cal-lich'o-nia 

Cal'ii-cles 

Cal~U-*o-Io'na 

Cal-iifi'ra-tcs 

Cal-lirfi-iw 

CaMid'ro-mtu 

Cal-li-je'tus 



CA 

Cal-lim'a-chus (12) 

Cat-lim'e-don 

Cal-liin' e-des 

Cal-Ji' miB 

Cal-b'o-p6(8) 

Cal-li-pa-ti'ra(30) 

Cal' li-phon 

Cal' li-phron 

Cal-lif/i-de 

Cal-lip'ci-lis 

Cat' li-pus 

Cal-iip'y-ges 

CaJ-lir"!io-e (8) 

Cai-lis'te 

Cal-lis-le'i-a 

Cal-lis' the-nes 

Cal -lis' to 

Cal-lis-to-ni'cus 

Cal-lis'tra-tus 

Cal-lix'e-iu 

Cal-iix'e-ima 

Ca'lon 

Ca'lor 

Cal'pe 

Cal-f^iH^ni-a 

Cal-phur' ni-ns 

Cal-pur'ni-a 

Cal'vi-« 

Cal-vi' na 

Cai-vw'i-us(lO) 

Cal-u-sid'j-us 

Cal-u'si-um (10) 

Carj-be(8) 

Cal-j-catl'iius 

Cal'y-ce{ei 

Ca-lvffi-mii 

Cii-kd'iw 

Cal'y-don (6) 

Cal-y-do' nis 

Ca!-y-do' ui-ta 

Ca-ijin' ne 



CA 



13 



Ca-lyn'da 
Ca-lyp'so 
Ca-man'ti-nm (10) 
Cam-a-ri'na 
Cam-bau' let 
Cam'bes 
Cam' bre 
Cam-bu' ni-i (4) 
Crtin-by'aes 
Cam-e-U'ni (3) 
Cain-«^li'be 
Cam'e-™(7) 
Cam-e-ri' niun, aDd- 

Ca-me' ri-uai 
Cam-e-ri'niu 
Ca-mcr'ti-DB 
Ca-mer' tea 
Ca-mil'Ia 
Ca-mif U, aod 

Ca-mil'Ia 
Ca-mil' luB 
Ca-mi'ro 
Ca-mi' ms, aad 

Ca-mi' ra 
Cam-i»-sa' res 
Cam' ma 
Ca-mce'nK 
Cam-pa' na Lex 
Cam-pa' ni-a 
Cam' pe (8) 
Cam-pas' pe 
Camp' sa 

Cam' pus Mar'ti-ua 
Cam-u-lo-gi' nus 
Ca'na 
Can' a-re 
Can'a-che(12) 
Can' a-dnis 
Ca'nffi 

Ca-na' ri-i (4) 
Can'a-fliiii 



u, 



CA 



CA^ 



CA 



♦Can'da-ce 

Can-da^ vi-a 

Can<-dauMes 

Can di'o-pe 

Ca' nens 

Can-e-pho' ri-a 

Gan'je-thum 

Ca-qic-u-la'res di'es 

Ca-nid'i*a 

Ca-nid'i-us 

Ca-nin-e-fV'tes 

Ca-nin' i-us 

Calms' ti-us (10) 

Ca' ui-u8 

Can'nae 

Ca-noj/i-cum 

Ca-no'pus 

Can^ta-bra 

Can' tar-bri (3) 
Can-ta' bri-^ae (4) 
Can' tha-nis (20) 
Can' thus 
Can'ti-iini(lO) 
Can-u-le^ i-a 
Can-u Je' Uus 
Ca-nu'li-a 
Ca-nu'si-um (10) 
Ca-nu' si-US 
Ca-nu'ti-us (10) ^ 
Cap'ar-neuSy 5 syll. 
Ca-pel'la 
Ca-pe'na 
Ca-pe'nas 
Ca-pe'ni (3) 
Ca' per 
Ca-pe' tus 
Ca-pha' re-US 
Caph'y-ae (4) 



Ca'pi-o (4) 
Cap-is-se' ne 
Cap' i»-to 
Ca-pit-o-li'nus 
Cap-i-to' U-um 
Cap-pa-dc/ ci*a (10) 
Cap' pa-dox 
Ca-pra' ri-a 
Ca'pre-8B 
Cap-ri-cor'nus 
Cap-ri-fic-i-a'lb 
Ca-pri'na 
Ca-prip' e-des 
Ca' pri-us 
Cap-ro-li' na 
Ca'prus 
Cap' sa 
Cap'sa-ge 
Cap' u-« 
Ca' pys 

Ca'pys Syl'vi-us 
Car-a-bac' tra 
Car' a-bis (20) 
C^^a-cal' la 
Ca-rac/a-tes * * 
Ca-rac' ta-cus 
Ca'rae 
Ca-rae' us 
Car' a-lis 
Car'a-hus (20) 
Ca-rau'si-us (10) 
Cai^bo 

Car-che'don (12) 
Car-ci' nus 
Car-da' ces 
Car-dam'y-le 
Car' di-a 
Car-du'chi(12)(3) 



|Ca'rcs 

Car'e-sa ~ ' 

Carres' sus 

Car-fin' i-a 

Ca' ri-a 

Ca' ri-as 

Ca-*ri'a-te 

Ca-ri'na 

Ca-ri'nae 

Car'i-ne 

Ca-ri' nus 

Ca-ris' sa-nuni 

Ca-ris' turn 

Car-ma' ni-a 

Car-nia' nor 

Car' me 

Car-me' lus 
Car-men' ta, and 
Car-men' tis 
Car-meurta' les 
Car-men-ta' lis 
Car'mi-des (6) (20) 
Cai^ na Car-din' e-a 
Car-na'si-us (10) 
Car-ne'a-des ■ 
Car-ne'i-a 
Car'ni-em 
Cai-'nus 
Car-nu' tes 
Car-pa' si-a (11) 
Car-pa' si-uih (II) 
Car'pa-thus 
Car'.pi-a (7) 
Cai'' pis 
Car'po 

Car-poph' o-ra 
Car-ix)ph'o-rus 
Car'rje, and Car'rhtt 



* Candace. — Lsmpriere, Labbe, ^nd Aiiisworth, accent thia word on thefusi^ 
fvllable, but Oouldman and'Holyoke on the las(; and I am much mistaken 
if the general ear has not sanctioned this latter proniuiqiation^ and given it the 
/>reference. 



CA 

Car-ri-na' tes 

Carrfu'ca - 

Car-se'o-li(3) 

Car-ta'li-as 

Car-tliEe'a 

Car-tha-gin-i-en' sea 

Car-tha'go 

Ca/t/iage, (Eng.) 

Car'tha>eb 

Car-tei'a, 3 syll. 

Car-vU' i-us 

Ca' nis 

Ca'ry-*(6)(7) 

Car-j-a' tx 

Car-y-a'tis 

Ca-rjs'ti-us 

Ca-iys* tu8 

Ca' ry-um 

Cas'ca 

Cas-cel' li-us 

Ca»-i-li'num 

Ca-si'na Ca-si'num 

Ca'si-us (10) 

Cas'me-nie 

Cas-mina 

Caa-pe'ri-a 

Cas-iWu-ia 

Cas-pi-a'na 

Cag'pi-i (4) 

Cas' pi-um ma' re 

Cas-saii-da'na 

Cas-sai/der 

Cas-saii' dra 

Cas-saii'dri'a 

Cas'Bi-a{IO) 

C'as-,^i' o-pe 

CaS'St-o-pe'« 

Cas-si-ter* i-des 

Cas-8i-V«-lati' nus 

CW si-US, C. (10) 

Cas-so'tis' 

Cas-tab' a-la 



CA 

Cas-ta' fi-a 
Cas-ta' li-us fona 
Cas- to' I us 
Cos-ta' ne-a 
Cu-s-li-a-Lii'ia 
Cas' tor and PoKlux 
Ca*^ra'ti-us(10) 
Cas'tu-lo 
Cat-a-du' pa 
Cal-u-nieii' te-lea 
Cat*a-na (20) 
Cat-af/ ui-a 
Cat-a-rac'ta 
Cat'e-nex 
Ca-Ase'a 
Cath'a-ri (3) 
Ca'ti-a(n) 
Ca-ti-e' na 
Ca-ti-e' iius 
Cat-i-li'iia 
Cafi-line, (Eng.) 
Ca-til'li(3) 
Ca-tl'liis, or 
Cat'i-lus 
Ca-ti'iia 

Ca'ti-DS(IO) 

Cat'i-zi(:J) 
Ca'to(l) 
Ca' tre-us 
Cat'ta 
Cat* ti (3) 
Cat-u-li-a' na 
Cu-tiil' lus 
Cat'u-lus (eO) 
Cav-a-ril' lus 
Cav-a-ri' una 
Cau' ca-sii3 
Cm'coii 
Can' co-nes 
Cau'di, aud 
Cuu' di-iim 
Ca'vi-i(3> 
Cau-lo' 014 



. CE «5 

Can' ni-ui 
Cau' nus 
Cau'ros 
Cau' nis . 
Ca'us 

Ca-/ciC3)C6) 
Ca-/ cus 
Ca-vs'ter 
Ce'a, orCe'os 
Ce'a-des 
Ceb-aHi' mu 
Ceb-a-tWser 
Ce'bes 
Ce'brrai 
Ce-bru' iii-a 
Ce-bri' o-net 
Cec' i-das 
Ce-cil'i-«i 
Ccc' i-iia 
Ce-cin' na, A. 
Ce-cro'pi-a 
Ce-ciop'i-diB 
Ce' crops 
Cer-cjph'a-te 
■Ced-re-a' tis 
Ce'don 
Ce-dru'fQ-i (3) 
Ceg' lu-sa 
Ce' i (3) 
Cel' a-don • 
Cel'a-du» 
Ce-lae^iMB 
Cfr-la^no 
Cere-«(4) 
Cc-le'i-a,«idCe'la 
Cel-e-la' tes 
Ceileu'dras 
Ce-len' dris 
Ci!-len' de-rt> 
Ce-le'ne-us 
Ce-len' U8 Ce-Wnt~ 
Ce'lw 
Ccl'c-ref 



4S CE 

Cel'e-trum 

Ce'le-us 

Cel'mus 

Cel'o-im 

Cel'suB 

Cel'tas 

Cel-ti-be'ri 

Cel'ti-ca 

Cel'drd 

Cel-lil'Ius 

Cel-t</ri-i (4) 

Cel-t08? cy-tJiK 

Cem' me-nus 

Ceni'pai(3) 

Ce-tiffi' um 

Ctii'€hre-*(Je) 

Cen' chre-is 

Cetfehre-us 

Cen'chri-us 

Ce-ne«'po-4i9 

Ce-ne'ti-um(lO) 

Ce'ne-us. 

Cen-i-mag' ni 

Ce-ni'na 

Cen-o-ma'ni 

Cen-so'res 

Ccn-sp-ri nuj 

Cen'sus 

Cen-ta-re'tu9 

Cen-tiiuVi (J) 

Cen-tau' rus 

Cen-tob' ri-ca 

Cen'to-res (20) 

Cen-tor'i-pa 

Cen-tri'tes 

Cen-tro'ni-iis 

Cen-tum'vi-ri (4) 

On-lu'n-a 

Cen-tu'ri-pa 

Ce'os, and Ce'a 

Ceph'a-Ias 

Opb-a-lc'dt-on 

Pe-phal'leu 



C£ 

Cepb-a-le'na 

Ceph-al-le'iii-a 

Ceph'a-lo 

Ceph-a-Ioe'dis (5) 

Ceph'a-lon 

Cepli-a-iot' o-mi 

Ceph-a-lu' dj-um 

Ceph' a-lu3 

Ce^phe-u3 

Ce-phe'nes 

Cc-pfiis'i-aC10)(20) 

Cepn-i-si' a-des , 

Ce-phia-i-do' rus 

Ce-phis'i-on(lO) 

Ce-phis-od' o-tiu 

Ce-plii' 9U9 

Ce-phis'sua 

Ce' phi'cn 

Ce'pi-o 

Ct' pi-on 

Cer«-ca 

Ce-rac' a-tca 

Ce-rani' bus 

Cer-a-mi' cus 

Ce-ro' iiii-um 

Cci''a-mus (SO) 

Ce'ras 

Cer'a-BUs 

Cer'a-ta 

Ce-ra' tus 

Ce-rau'ni-a 

Ce-rau' ni-i (4) 

Ce-rau' nu3 

Ct-rau' si-US (10) 

Cer-be' li-on 

Cer' be-rus 

Cer' ca-plius 

Cer-ca-so' rum 

Ccr-ce' is 

Cer-ce' ne 

Ccr-ccs'tes 

Cer'ci-dea 

Cer'cM(4) 



CE 

Cer-ci'na 
Cer-cin'na 
Cer-cin'i-um 
Cei^ci-us<lO> 
Cer-co'pes 
Cer* cops 

Cer'cv-on(lO) , 
Or-r/ o-iJM 
Cer-cj-' ra, or 
Car-cy ra 
Cer-dyl' i-um 
Cer-e-a' li-a 
Ce'res 
Ce-iea' aiu 
Ciye-tie 
Ce-ri-a' lis 
Ce'ri-i(4) ■ 
Ce-rii' lutn 
Ce-rin' thiw 
Cer-y-ni' tes 
Cer-iiia' iiifs 
Cer'nes 
Ce' roH 

Cer-o-pas' a-de> 
Ce-ros'sus 
Cer'pUe-res 
Cer-rhs'i(3) 
Cer-sob-lep' lei 
Cer'ti-ma 
Cer-to' ni'Um 
Cer-va' ri-ua 
CtVy-ceaCtiX^O) 
Ce-vyc'i-ui 
Cer-y-mi' ca 
Cer-ne' a 
Ce-iyn' i-tes 
Ce-sel' Ii-U8 
Ce-sen'ni-a 
Ces'ti-iisClO) 
Ces-tri'lia 
Ces-tri' 1(113 

Ce -the' gut 



ca 

i:Vti-i(4)(10) 

Ce* ti-us (10) 

Ce'to 

Ce'iu, and Cafua 

Ce> 

Chttf bes 

Che's* (12) 

Cfaa-bi' iius 

Clia'bri-a 

Cha' bri-as 

Chab'ry-is(6) 

CIi«-arfi-tiB(4) 

Cha^re-as 

Cliser-e-de' mus 

ChiB-ie' mon 

Clia;r' e-phon 

Chas-re/tra-ta 

Chse-rin' thus 

Chae-riu' pus 

ChiE'ro 

Chffi-ro' ni-a 

Chfp-ro-im'aand 

ClJtr-ro-ne'a 
Cha-ite' on 
Chal-cie'a 
Cfaai' ce-a 
Cbal-ce'don, and 
Chal-ce-do'ni-a 
Cbal-ci-de* ne 
Cha!-ci-deii'aes 
Chal'Cid'e-iis 
Oial-cid' i-ca 
Chal-cid'i-cua 
Chal-ci-a-'us 
ChaUci' o-pe 
Chai-ci'lis(3) 
Chafcis 



• Chea. — Tbc eh in tbh, and all vronb A«m tli« Greek and La^a, nmtt be n 
BDOncedlikeft. 

t CAoraiiniic— Drjdeii, in his tnfcdy of All far Lavr, Lm aqgUckcd tl 
WOrd.mtO CImrmum .v-Cbe dt pronoiiBced at m cktrm. 



CH 

Chal'co-doQ 
(Jhaf COD 
Chal'cus 
Chal-d^'a 
ChaW!E'i(3) 
Cha-W tra 
Ohal-o-iii' tis 
Chill' y-bes, and 

Cji'j-bes 
Chal-y-bo-ni'tis 
Chal-yba 
Cba-raa'Di 
Cbam-a'vi'ri (4) 
Cba' lie 
Cha' on 
Cha' o-nes 
Cha-o' iii~a 
Cha-o-ui' tis 
Cha' OS 
Char'a-dra 
Cha-ra'dros 
Chai' a-drua 
Cha-r»' a-das 
Char-an-ds' i 
Cim' rax 
Clia-rax'es, and 
Cha-rax'us 
Cha' res 
Chai'i-cles 
Chai' i-clo 
Cliar-i-cli'des 
Char-i-de'inus 
CUai'i-la 
Char-i-la' us, and 
Cha-ril' us 
Clia-ri'iii, and 

Cu-ri'iii(3) 



cn « 

Cha'm 
Cha-ii/i-a 
Char* i-tes 
Char'i-ltMi 
Cba/tni-das 
Chai^ me, and 

Cai-' me 
Char'nii-des 
Char-mi' iiuS 
tChar-nii'o-iw 
Chai^niB 
Char-mos'^-na 
Char' mo-tas 
Chai^ mus 
Cba'ron 
Cha-ron' daa 

Clia-ro' ni-um 
Ciia' rops, and 
Cliar'(»-pes 
Cim-rjb'dis 
Cliau'bi, and 
Cbati'ci 
Chau' la (7) 
Chau' rua 
Che' Is 
Che'Ies 
Chel-i-do'ni-a 
Chel-i-do'oi-a 
Che-lid' o^iis 
CheK o-ne 
Chel' o-nb 
Cliel-o-noph' a-{p 
Cbel-y-do' re-a 
Chem' mis 
Che'na (7) 
Che'ns 



«8 CH 

Cbe'nt-on 

Che'ni-us 

Cfae' opB, and 

Che-os'pcs ' 

Che'phren 

Cher-e-moc'ra-ti 

Che-ris'o-phus 

Cher'o-phon 

Cher'si-as ( 10) 

Clier-aid'a-mas 

Clier'si-pho 

Oier-so-ne' sus 

Che-rus'ci (3) 

Chid-na'i(3) 

Ciiil-i-ar'chus 

Chil'i-us.and 

Chil'e-ui 
Cbi'lo 
Chi-lo'Dis 
Chi-ma:' ra 
Cbim'a-rus 
Chi-mc'ri-iiHi. 
Clii-om'a-l'H 
Chi' on (1) 
Chi'o-ne (8) 
Oii-on'i-deii 
'Chi'o-mB 
Chi' OS 
Chi'ron 
Chif o-ne (8) 
Chlo'e 
Chlo' r«-us 
Ohio' ris 
Chlo'rus 
Cho-a-ri'm 
Cbo-as/ pes 
Cho' bus 
Choer' a-des 
Choer'i-liis 



i(3) 



CH 

Cheer' e-ae 
Clion'ni-das 
Clion'ii-phis ' 
Ciio-ras'ini(3> 
Cljo-iin'e-iis 
Cho-roe' bus 
Cho-iom-na: 
Chos' ro-es 
Clire' mes 
Chrem' e-tes 
Chres' i-phon 
Chres-plion' te» 
Chres^tus 
Chro'mi-a 
Chro'ini-os 
Chro' mis 
.Chro'rai-U3 
Chro' ni-us 
Chro'nrfs 
Clir/ n-sus 
Chiysaand 

Chry'se 
Chry/a-ine 
Chi-)- sail' las 
Chrj-saii'tlii-us 
Cluy-san' tis 
*Chry-Ba'or 
Chrys-a-o' re-us 
Chrj--sa' o-ris ' 
Chr/sas 
Chrf-Bt' is 
Chry-ser' mus 

Chry-sip'pe 
Chij-sip' pus 
Clirj^sis 

Chrys-oW pi-^es 
Chn-sog' o-ntia 
Ciirys-o-la' lis 



CI 

Cliry-so'di-uni 

Chry-sop' o-lis 

Chry-soi'rho-a 

Cliry-sov'rho-as 

Chrys' os-tom 

Chrys-oth' e-mii 

Chryx' US 

Chtho'ni-a(12) 

Chtho' ni-us (12) 

Chi'truni 

Cib-a-ri'tis 

Cib'y-ra 

Cic' e-ro 

Cith' y-ris 

Cic'o-nes 

Ci-cu' ta 

Ci-lic'i-a(10> 

Ci-iis'sa 

Ci'Iix 

Cil'la 

Cilfles 

CiClus 

Cil' ni-us 

Cflo 

Cim'ber 

Cim-be' ri-tU 

Cim'briCS) 

Cim' bri-cum 

Cim' i-tuis 

Cim-me' a-i (4) 

Cim' nie-ris 

Cini-nie'ri-um 

Ci-mo'Jis, and 

Ci-no' lis 
Ci-nio'lus 
Ci'mon 
Ci-nte' thon 
Ci-naK a-das 
Cin'ci-a(IO) 



* Ciryjaw.— Then atsirtPii otit, whco yon hr^i^n to bleed, 
"Pie great Ckrywr, and tlw salbnt iWed. 

t:oosE'« Httieit. Tlu^. 



CI 

Cin-cin-na'tus, L,Q. 
Cin'ci-usClO) 
Cin'e-as 
Ci-ne'si-as (11) 
Cin'e-thon 
Citfga 
Cin-get'o-rix 
Sitt-je^ o-rix 
Cii/gii-Ium 
Cin-i-u'tB 
Ci-nith'i-i (4) 
Cin'na 
Cin'na-clon 
Cm'na-niiis 
Ciu-Di'a-iia 
Cin\'i-a 
' Ci' nyps, aiicl 
Cin'j'-plius 
Cu/y-raa 
Ci'os 
Cip'pus 
CiKce 

Cir-ceii'ses lu'di 
Ci/ci-us (10) 
CiKcus 
Ci'ris 

Cir-ne' a-tum 
i^ir'rha, and 

Cyi'rha 
Cir'tha, aiid Cir'ta 
Cb-al-pi'iia Oaf U-a 
Cis'pa 
Cis'sa 
Cis'se-h 
Cis-se'us 
Cia'Hi-a(l]) 



CL 

Ci8'9i-ffi<ll) 

Cis* si-des 
Ci»-S(es'»a (5) 

Cis-su'sa 

Ci-thie' rem 
Citli-a-ris' ta 
Cif i-ura (10) 
Ci-vi'Iis 
Ci'u.. 
Ci/v-ciim 
CI a' de-US 
Cla'nes 

Cla'iii-us, or Cla'nis 

Cla'nia 

Clas-tid'l-um 

Clau'di-a 

Claii'di-K 

Ctau-di-a'nu9 

Claii-di-op'o-Iis 

Clan' di- us 

Clav-i-t'iiiis 

(!'lav'i-ger 

Ciaii'sus 

Cla-zom'e-na;, and 

Cla-zoin'e-na 
Cle'a-das 
C!e-a.i'der 
Cle-Mn' dri-das 
Cle-an'thes 
Cle-ai-'chiis' 
Cle-ai'i-tles 
Qe-mens 
Clc'o 



CL - 

CVo-bis 

Cle-o-bu' )a 

C!e-ob-u-li'iia 

Cle-o-ljii' Iu9 

Cle-o-cha'res 

Clo-o-clm'ri-a 

Clc-o-dse'us 

Clc-od'a-mas 

CltNO-de'miin 

Cie-o-do'ra 

Cle-o-dy^'a 

Clc-t^'fi-iies: 

Cl<s-o-la lis 

Cle-om'a-chus 

Cle-o-man'tpa 

Cle-oni' bro-tiis 

('le-o-ine'des 

*CIt!-oin' c-nes 

Cle' on 

Cle-o'nas, and 

Cie' o-na 
Cle-o'ne 
CIc-o-ni'ca 
ClfMMii'ous (30) 
Cle-oii'nis ' 
Cle-im'y-inus 
Cle-oj/a-tcr 
ft-'le-y-pa'tra 
(jle-op'a-tris 
Cle-oph'a-nes 
Cle-o-pliaii'tliitt 
Cle'o-phes 
Cle-oph'o-Kis 
Cle'o-irfion 
Cie-o-plij'lus 
Cle-o-pom'pu» 



■• CWuew*.— There ia an uii:ii-ecnmlal)le c^ncn in Drjdea's accentualioa 
•f lliis word, in opposition tu all prosody; for thraugli the wtiulu tragedy of 
thU tiiie hp places ilie accent on the penultimate ioslead of Ibe uitepaiuil- 
' tinmte syllabic 

t aeopatf. The leaned editor of Lalibe tells na thi« word ongbt to be or*. 
UMDced »1fli the accent on tlie antepeiraitiniate, Cle^i/a-tra, tbougfa ^ p^ 
aolUnata acpcntwition, he layf, is (be mote . *^ . 



30 



CI. 



Cie'o-pus 

Oe-o'ra 

Cte-os'tra-tus 

Cle-oi/e-fius 

Clep'sy-dra 

Cle'ri (3) 

0169*1-1168 

Cle'te 

Clib'a-nus 

Cli-de'niu9 

Cliin'e-nu» 

Cli'nas 

Cli-uip' pi-des 

Cli'nua 

C\i'o 

Cli-stth'e-ra 

ells' the-nes 

CU'te 

Cli-tar'cliuft 

Cli'ts 

Cli-tei'ni-a 

CUt-oKle'nius 

Cli-tom'a-cliiis 

Cli-tou'y-mu8 

Clit'o-piiOQ 

Cli'tor 

Cli-to'ri-a 

Cii-tum'nus 

Cli'tus 

Clo-a-ci'na 

Clo-«n'thua 

Clo'di-a 

Clo'di-us 

Clffi'li-a 

Cke'Ii-» (4) 

Cke'U-us 

Clo'n 



CO 

Clon'di-ciu 

Clo'ni-a 

Clo'ni-us 

Clo'lho 

Clu-a-ci'na 

Clu-eii'ti-usvl0> 

Clu'po-a, and 

Clyp'e-a (23) 
au'si-a(n) 
Clu^i'ni foo'tes 
CJu-si'o-ium 
Ciu'si-uni ( 10> 
Clu'si-U8(10) 
Clu'vi-a 

Cki'vi-us Ru'fus 
Cljin'e-ue 
Ciym-en-e'i-dea 
Cljm'e-niis 
Cl,^o„-,-mu's. 
Cljt-em-ncs'tra 
Clyt'i-a, or C)jt'i-e 
. Clyfi-us(IO) 
' Ciy'tus 
*Cija-ca'di-um (13) 
Cuac' a-lU 
Cna'gi-a 
Cne'mus 

Cne'us, or Cnae'us 
Cni-diii' i-uin 
Cni'dus, or 

Gni'diis 
Cno'pHs(13) 
Cnos'si-a (11) 
Cno'sua 
Co'os, mid Cos 
Co-a-ina' iii 
Co~as'trip, and 

Co-ac'ti-« 
Cob'a-res 



CO 

Coc'a-Ius 
Coc* ce' i-u» 
Coc-c yg' i-iis 
Co'clcs, Pub.Horat. 
Coc'li-K, and 

Coi'ti-K 
Co-c/tus 
Co-doiu'a-mw 
Cod'ri-diE 
Co-drop' o-lia 
Co' dnis 
Coe-cil' i-us 
Coi'la 
Coe-lai'e-tK 
C'ce)-e-syr'i-a, and 

Cce-lo-sjr' i-ft 
Cce-li-a 
Cce-li-ob'ri-^a 
Coe'li-ii3 
Coe'Ius 
Coe'nus 
Coct'a-niis 
Co'ea 

C<^a-mus 

C<^-i-du'nus; 

Co'hi-biis 

Co'hors 

Co-lie' nils 

Co-lax'a-is 

Co-lax'es 

Col'clii(12)(3> 

Col'chis, and 

Col'chos 

Co-! en' da 

Co' I i -as 

Col-la' li-a 

Col-la-ti'niB 

CoI-li'nQ+- 



" fRaatdium.—C bctore S. Hi tliis and llie iiicceediug words, it male ; uid 
they must lip pruaouDcetl m if writttn A'lioiiiiuni, SaaJis, tiC 

1 Codina.— LeiiipriiTc acccuts tlii» word on tbe autepenuUiniate ; but Ai«to 
iror/^ Oeoldxauif and Hol}cdic> moic properly on tbe peoaltiauiM. 



CO 

Col-l»/ci-a 
Co'Io 
Co-lo'nac 
Co-Jo' ne 
Co-lo' nos 
ColVphon 
Co-Jos' se, and 
Co-Ids' sis 
Co-loa'suB 
*Col'o-tea 
Col'pe 
Co-lum' ba 
Col-u-mel' la 
Co-lu' tlitis 
Co-lyt'tus 
Com-a-^e'na 
Com-a-^'ni 
Co-ma' iia 
Co-ma' nj-a 
Com'a-ri (3) 
Com'a-ru3 
Co-mas' tu9 
Com-bu'bu9 
Com'l;e 
Com'bi(3) 
Com-bre'a 
Com'bu-tis 
Co-me' Ics 
Com'e-tlio 
Co-min't-u3 
Co-mil^ i-a (If)) 
Co* mi-US 
Com' mo-dua 
Co' moil 
Coni-pi-tu' li-a 
Comp' sii-tLis 
Com-pu' sa 
Co'mus 
Con' ca-iii (3) 



CO 

Con-cor'di-* 
Con' da-lus 
Con' da-te 
Con-do-cha' tes 
Con-dru'si (3) 
("im-dvKi-a 
Co'ne'(7) 
Coii-e-to-dti' mis 
Co»-fu'ci-us(IO) 
Coii-ge' dns 
Cx>'m-i(3> 
('oii-i-sal'ttw 
Co-nis' fi (3) 
CuR-ni' das 
Co'iieo 
Coii-se;i' (PS 
Coii-sen'ti-a 

<'(Hl-si<i'MlS 

Con-si-li' aura 

Coll' si :l Its 
Co,,-.i™'t,-a(U) 

C on-stan-ti -HO p' o- 

lis 
Con-stan-ti'nus 
Con' s(flw-*!>(e,(Eng. 
Con-Stan' li-us (10) 

Con-9jg'na 

Con-to-des'diis 

Con-tu'bi-a (7) 

Co' on 

Co' OS, Cos, Ce'a, 

and Co 
Co'pje 
Co-phon'tis 
Co' phas 
Co'pi-a (7) 
Co-pil' lu3 



CO M 

Co-po' niriis 

Co^ra-tes 

Co' pre-us 

Cop'tus, and Cop^ tos 

Co'ra 

<!'oi-a-ce'si-iuti, and 

Cor-a-cen' ^si-utn 

Cor-B-co-tia' sua 

Co-ral'e-Re 

Co-ral' li (3) 

Co-ra' nus 

Co' ras 

Co' rax 

Co-rax' i (3) 

Cor'iie-us 

CoKbia 

Co/bu-lo 

Cor-c/ra 

Cof' dn-ba 

Cor-du-e'ne(8) 

Co' re (8) 

Co-res'sus 

CoKe-sus 

Cor'e-tas 

Cor-lin' i-nm 

Co' ri-a (7) 

Co;-riti'e-u>a 

Co-rin'n« 

Co-rin' bus 

Co^rin'thus 

Co-ri-o-la' nus (S^) 

Co-ri' o-li, and 

Co-ri-ol' la 

Co-ris' sus 

Cor' i-tus 

Coi'mtu 

Cor' ma-n 

Cor-ne'li-« 

Cor-ne' ii-i (4) 



" Viilota, Aioanoi'iii liiid Lenipricte acceot this word on 

malt syllable but Labbe, Goulduian, and Halyokc, wnn ^jvM^ W. Um 
(uwnl eu-,,M tbe p«Bultiinate. 



3£ CO 

Cor-nic'u-lum 
Cor-tii-iic'i-us (10) 
Cor' iii-ger 
Cor-nu'tus 
CoHxu'bus 

Cor-o-ne'a 
Co-ro'nis 
Co-roii' ta 
Co-ro'llua 
Cor-rha' gi-um 
Coi'si (3) 
Cor'si-fe 
Cor'si-ca (7> 
Cor'so-te 
Cor'su-ra (7) 
Cor-to' life 
Cor-vi' nus 
Cor-uu-ca' nus 
Co' ru3 

Cor-y-bW tes (6) 
Coi'y-bas 
Cor-y-baa' sa 
Cor'y-bus 
Co-rjc'i-a ^24) 
Co-rjc'i-des 
Co-i7c'i-us(I0) 
Cor* y-ci»s (6) 
Cor'y-don 
Cor' j-la, and 
Cor-y-le'uin 
Co-rym' bi-fer 
Cor'y-na 
Cor-y+ne'ta, and 

Cor-v-plm' st-um 

Cor-y-lhen'ses 

Cor' y-hus 

Co-iyiUB(6) 

Cos 

Co'n, afld Cos'sa, 

or Co' Be 
Cos-co^ni-us 



CR 

' Co'siii'gas- 

Co'sis 

Cos'mus 

Cos'se-a (7> 

CDs' sua 

Co»-su'ti-i (4) 

Cos-to-boj'i (3) 

Co-syra 

Co' tes, and Cot' tes 

Co'thoo 

Co-tlio'ne-a (7) 

Cot'i-so 

Cot-to' uis 

Cot'ta 

Cot'ti-iB Ai'pca 

Cot'tiis . 

Cot-y-ae' uin (6) 

C,)-u'o-ru 

Col-\-!i£'llS 

Ct.-tjl'i-us 

Co'lj-s 

Co-tyt'to 

Cram-bii' sa . 
Cran' a-i (3> 
Cran' a-pts 
Cran'a-u» 
Cra'nc 
Cra-ne' tiui 
Cra'ni-i(4) 
Cra'non, and 
Cran'iioii 
Cran' lor 

Cra-as-sit' i-us (10) 
eras' sus 
Cras-ti' nus 
Crat'a-is 
Cro-tie' us 
Cra' ter 

Crat'e-ru«(eO> 
Cra' tes 
Crat-es-i-cle'a 
Crat-e-sip'o-lM 



Crat-e-sip' pi-da* 

Ci-a-le'vas 

Cra' te-us 

Cj-Zthis 

Cra-ti'nio 

Crn-tip' pus 

Cnit'y-!u»((i> 

Crau'si-% (II) 

Craii'sU 

Cra-us'i-das 

Crem' e-ra 

Creni' ina 

Creni' iny>on, and 

Crom'nnv-oii 
Crem' III, and 
Crem' iios 
Cre-ino' iia 
Crem'i-<!us 
Crc-mu'ti-us(10> 
Civ/ on 

Crc-oii-li'a-des 
Crc-oph'i-lus 
Cre-pe'ri-us 
Crt» 

CrL-'sa, and Cres'sa 
Cre'sius(ll) 
tlres-plion' tes 
Cres' si-US (11) 
Cres' ton 
Cre'siis 
Crc'ta 

Crete, (Eng. (8) 
Cre-ta/us 
Cre'te (8) 
Cve'te-a(7) 
Cre'tea 
Cie'te-us 
Cre' tlic-is 
Cre'the-us 
Crclh' o-na 
Crei' i-cu9 
Cres'saa 
Cre-u'sB (7) 



CR 



CY 



CY 



ss 



Cre-u' sis 
Cri' a-sud 
Cri-nip'pus 
Cri'nis 
Cri-ni^suSy and 

Cri-mi^sus 
Cri'no 
Crimson 
Cris-pi^ na 
Cris-pi' nus 
Crit' a-la 
Crith' e-is 
Cri-tho' te 
Ciif i-as (10) 
Cri' to 

Crit-o-buMus 
Crit-og-na' tus 
Crit-o-Ia'us 
Cri'us 
Cro-bi'a-lus 
* Crob'y-zi(3) 
Croc' a-le 
Cro'ce-ae 

Croc-o-di4op' o-lis 
Cro' cus 
Croe'sus 
Cro-i' tes 
Cro'mi(3) 
Crom' my-on 
Crom^na 
Cro^mus 

Cro'ni-a(7) 
Cron' i-des 
Cro' ni-um 
Cro' phi (3) 
Cros-sae'a 
Crot' a-lus 
Cro' ton 
Cro-to' na (7) 
Crot-o-ni' a-tis 
Cro-to' pi-as 
Cro-to'pus 
Cni'nos 



Cm' sis 

Crus-tu-me' ri (4) 
Cras-tu-me' ri-a 
Crus-tu-n^e' ri-um 
Crus-tu-mi' numf 
Criis-tu' nii-iim 
Crus-ti/ nisy and 
Crus-tur-ne' ui-us 
Cr/nis 
Cre' a-tus 
Ctem'e-ne (13) 
Cte' nos 
Cte'si-as 
Cte-sib' i-us 
Ctes'i-cles 
Cte-sil' 6-chus 
etas' i-phon (13) 
Cte-sip' pus 
Ctim'e-ne 
Cu' la-ro 

Cu' ma and Cu' mse 
Cu-nax'a (7) 
Cu-pa'vo 
Cu-pen' tus 
Cu-pi' do 
Cu-pi-en'ni-us 
Cu'res 
Cu-re' tes 
Cu-re'tis 
Cu'ri-a 

Cu-ri.a'ti.i(4) 
Cu'n-o 

Cu-ri-0!-8ol' i-tae 
Cu'ri-um 

Cu'ri-us Den-ta'tus 
Cui^ti-a(lO) 
Cur-til' lus 
Ciu^ti-us(lO) 
Cu-ni'lis 
Cus-s»' i (3) 
Cu-til' i-uni 
Cy-am-o-so'rus 
Cy'a-ne(6)(8) 
D 



Cy-a'ne-8P!(4) 
Cy-an' e-c, and 
Cy-a' ne-ai 
Cy-a' ne-us 
Cy-a-nip' pe 
Cy-a-nip' pus 
Cy-a-rax' es, or 

Cy-ax' a-res (6) 
Cy-be'be 
Cyb'e-le 
Cyb' e-la, and 

Cyb-e'la 
Cyb' e-lus 
Cyb'i-ra 

Cy-ce'si-um (11) 
Cych' re-US (12) 
Cyc'la-des 
Cy-clo' pes 
Ok/ clopsy (Eng.) 
Cyc'rius 
Cy' da (6) 
Cyd'i-as 
Cy-dip' pe 
Cyd' nus 
C/don 
Cy-do' ni-a 
Cyd' ra-ra 
Cyd-ro-la' us 
Cyg' nus 
Cyl'a-bus 
Cyl' i-ces 
Cy-lin'dus 
Cyl-lal/ a-rus 
Cyl' la-rus 
Cyl'len 
Cyl-le' ne 
Cyl-le-ne' i-us 
Cyl.lyr'i.i(3)(4) 
C/lon 

Cy' ma, or Cy' mae 
Cy-mod' o-ce 
Cy-rood-o-ce'a 
Cy-mod-o-ce' as 



\ 



34 



cv 



GV 



CY 



Cy'me, and C/md 
Cym'o-lus, and 

Ci-mo' lus 
*Cym-o-po-Ii' a 
Cy-moth'o-e 
C}!!' a-ra 
Cyn-ae-gi' rus 
Cynaae' thi-um 
Cy-njt' ne 
Cy-na' pes • 
Cy-nax^ a 
Cyn' e-as 

Cy-ne' si-i (4), mid 
Cyn' e-tae 
Cyn-e-thus^ sa 
Cyn'i-a 

Cyn'i-ci (3) ' 
Cy-nis'ca 
C/«o(6) 
Cyn-o-ceph' a-le 
Cyn-o-ceph' a-li 
Cyn-o-phon'tb 
Cy-nor' tas 
Cy-nor'ti-on(ll) 
C/nos 
Cyii-o-sar' ges 



Cyn-os-se' ma 
Cyn-o-su'ra 
(^n' (hsurej (Eng.) 
Clyn'thi-a 
Cyn' thi-us 
Cyn'thus 
Cyn-u-ren' ses 
C/b«8 

Cyp-a-ris'si, and 
Cyp-a-ris'si-a (il) 
Cyp-j^-ris' sus 
Cyph' a-ra 
Cyp-ri-a'hus 
C/prus 
Cyp-seF i-des 
Cyp' se^lus 
Cy-rau' nis 
C/ re 

Cy-re-na' i-ca 
Cy-re-na' i-ci (3) 
Cy-re' ne (8) 
Cy-ri' a-des 
Cy-ril'lus 
Cy/i7, (Eng.) 
Cy-ri' nus 
Cyr'ne 



Cyr'nus 

Cyr-r«'i(3) 

Cyr' rha-cks 

■Cyr' rhes 

Cyr' rhus 

Cyr-ri-a'na (7) 

Cyr-si' lus 

Cyprus 

Cy-rpp'o-lis 

C/ta 

Cy-tae' is 

Cy-the' ra 

f Cyth-e-rae' a, or 

Cyth-^-re' a 
JCy th' e-ris 
Cy-the' ri-us 
Cy-the' ron 
Cy-the'nm 
Cyth'e-rus 
Cydi'nos 
Cy-tin'c-um 
Cyt-is-so' rus 
Cy-to' rus 
Cyr-i-ce' ni 
Cyz' i-cum 
Cyz' i-cus 



■'— t 



* See Iphigenia* — Neptune, who shakes the earthy his daughter gave, 

CymopoHa^ to reward the brave. 

Coo|tE*8 Hesiod. Thei^, t. IISJ. 



t CyfA^rra.— Behold a nymph arise, divinely fkv. 

Whom to Ctfthera first the surges bear ; 
And^iphrodUe, irom the foam, her name, 
Among the race of gods, and men the same ; ^ 
And Cytherea from Cythera came. j 

, Cooui'3 Hesiod, Theog, v. «99. 



^ 



X Cythei'is, 



-Mere poetry 



Your Romaa wits, your Gattns and TibuUus, 
Have tanght yon this from CytkerU «nd Delia. 

l^SiYDKs, All furl/me. 



( 35 > 



DA 



DA'iE, Da'ha 
Da^ci, and Da'cae 
Da'ci-a(ll) 
Dac'ty-li(3)(4) 
Dad' i-cae 
Dsed'a-la 
Dae-da' li-on 
Daed'a-lus 
Dae' mon 
Da'i(4) 
Da'i-cles (1) 
Da'i-dis 
Da-im' a-chus 
Da-im'e-nes 

Da'}-phroii.(l) 
Da-i'ra(l) 
Dal'di-a 
Dal-ma'ti-a(lO) 
Dal-ma'ti-us(lO) 
Dam-a-ge' tus 
Dam' a-lis 
Da'mias(l) 
Dam-a-sce' na 
Da-mas' ci.us (10) 
Da-mas' cus 
Dam-a-sip' pus 
Dam-a-sich' thon 
Dam-a-sis' tra-tus 
Dam-a-sith' y-nus 
Da-mas' tes 
Da'mi-a 
Da-mip'pus 
Da' mis 
Dam' no-rix 
Da' mo 
Dam' o-cles 
. Da-moc' rates 
Da-moc' rita 



DA 

Da-moc' ritus 

Da'tnon 

Dam-o-phan'tus 

Da-moph' i-la 

Da-moph' i-liis 

Dam' o-phon 

Da-mos' tra-tus 

Da-mox' e-nus • 

Da-myr'i-ad 

Da'na(7) 

Dan'a-e 

Dan' a-i (3) 

Da-na'i-des (4) 

Dan'a-la 

Dan'a-us 

Dan'da-ri, and 

Dan-dar'i-dae 

Dan' don 

Da-nu' bi-us 

Danfube, (Eng.) 

Da'o-chus (12) 

Daph'nae 

Daph-nae'us 

Daph' ne 

Daph-ne-pho' ri-a 

Daph'qb 

Daph'nus 

Dar'a-ba 

Da' raps 

Dar'da-ni(3) 

Dar-da'ni-a 

Dar-dan'i-dea 

Dar' da-nus 

Dar' da-ris 

Da' res 

Da-re' tis 

Da-ri'a 

D"a-ri'a-ves 

Da-rl'ta 

D2 



DE 

Da-ri'iis 
Das' con 
Das-cyl-i' tis 
Das' cy-lus 
Da' se-a 
Da'si-us (1.1) 
Das-sar' e-tse 
Das-sa-ri' tae 
Das-sa-re' ni 
Das-sa.rit'i-i(3((4) 
Dat' a-mes 
Dat-a-pher'nes 
Da' tis 

Da'tos, or Da' ton 
Dav'a-ra (7) 
Dau' lis 
I)au'ni(3) 
Dau' ni-a 
Dau' nus 
Dau'rifer, and 
Dau' ri-ses 
De-ceb'aJus 
De-ce' le-um 
Dec' e-lus 
De-cem' vi-ri (4) 
De-ce' ti-a (10) 
De-cid'i-us Sax' a 
De-cin' e-us 
De'ci-us(lO) 
De-cu' ri-o 
Ded-i-tam' e-nes 
Dej-a-ni' ra 
De-ic' o-on 
De-id-a-mi' a (30) 
De-i-le'on 
De-iro-chus(12) 
De-im' a-chus 
Dej- o-ces. 
De-i' o-chus 



De-fo-M 


De-me'trius 


De-ni-si-K' i (3) 


jDe-i-o'ne-us 


De'mo 


De-sud'a-ba 


Be-i-o-pe'i-a 


Dem-D-a-naa' sa 


Deu-cd'lMHi (28) 


De-jol-a-mi 


Dem-o^ce' des 


Deu-ce'ti-u9(10) 


De-iph'i-la 


De-moch' a-res 


Deu'do-rix 


De-iph'o-be 


D.;ni' o-cloa 


i)ex-am'e-iie 


De-iph'o-biu 


De-moc'oon 


Dex-am'e-nus 


De-i-phon 


De-moc' ra-tes 


Dex-ip' pus 


De-i-phon'K. 


De-moc' ri-tus 


Dex-ith'e-a 


De-ip'y-le (6) (7) . 


De-mod' i-ce (4) (8) 


Dex' i-us 


De-ip'y-liis 


De-mocf o-cus 


Di'a(l)(7)' 


De-ip'j-rus 


De-mo' Ie-U3 


Di-ac-o-pe'na 


DeKdon 


De-mo' leou 


Di-ac-tor'i-des 


De'li-a 


De'mon 


Di-ie'us 


De-Li'a-des 


Dem-o-nas' sa 


Di-a-du-me-ni-a' 


De'li-um 


"De-mo' nax 


nus 


De'H-ua 


Deni-o-m'ca(l> 


Di'a-gOD.and 


I}e1-ma'ti-u3(10) 


Dem-o-iii' cu9 


Di'a-gum 


Del-min'i-uin 


Doui-o-phaii' tus 


Di-iffi'o-ras 


De'los 


D«.moph'i-lus 


Di-a'IU 


•Del' phi 
Del'phi-cus 


Dem' o-phon 


Di-al'lus 


De-mopli'o-on 


Di-a-maa-ti-go' sis 


Bel-phin'i-a 


De-mop' o-lb 


Di-a'na(7) 


Del-phii/i-mn 


De'mo3 


Di-an'a-sa 


Del'phus 


De-mos'the-nes(18) 


Di-a'si-a(H) 


Del-ph/neCS). 


De-mas' ta-a-tus 


Di-c*'. 


35el'ta 


Dem'v-i.is 


Di-C«'lM 


Dem'a-des 


De-od'a-tus 


Di'ce(S) 


De-m»ii'e-tiis 


De-o'is 


Dic-e-ar'chus 


De-mas' o-nw 


Der'bi-ces 


Di-ce'ne-iis 


Dem-d-ra'ta 


DeKce 


Dic'o-mas . 


Dem-a-ra' tus 


Der'-cen'nus 


Dic'te 


De-mai'chus 


Der'ce-to, and 


Dic-tam'num, and 


Dem-a-re'ta 


Der'ce-tis 


Dic-tyii'na 


Dem-a-ris' te 


Der-cyl'li-daa 


Dic-la' tor 


De'me-a 


Der-cyl'lus 


Dic-tid-i-eii' ses 


De-me'tria 


Der' cy-Dus 


Dic-lyn'na 


De-me'trias 


Der-sit' (3) 


Dk'tys 



* Delphi. — 'I Ilia ward was, lumierly, univKi-sally writleti Drlphei 
Cumberlalii], n gentleman nu lefs rpmurkHblE liir lii» ulad^ical I'liiiiitiui 
di'iunalir aliiUtirs, iu liis H'idmp^ Delphi, meuii tlt'roniUit: viiljiii-it; 
ii Jiad beiui lo long invoKcdi 



DI 



DI 



IK) 



37 



Did'ius 
Di'do 
Did'^y-ma 
Did-y-mae' us 
Did-y-ma' on 
Did'y-me (6) (8) 
Did'y-mum 
Did'y-mus 
Di-eii' e-ces 



D 
D 
D 
D 
D 
D 
D 
D 
D 
D 
D 
D 
D 
D 
D 
D 
D 
D 
D 
D 
D 
D 
D 
D 
D 
D 



in' 
in' 
n' 



i-es' pi-ter 
^en'ti-a (10) 
g'ma 
'i(3)(4) 
i-mas^ SU8 
-nar'chus (12) 
-nol' o-chus 

' =-« (4) 
-as 

-che (12) 
i-noch' a-res 
-noc' ra-tes 
i-nod' o-chus 
-nom' e-ne3 

noa 
-nos' thenes 
i-nos' tra-tus 
i-o' cle-a 
l' o-cles 

-o-cle-ti-a' niis 
-O'cy ti-an, Eng. 
-o-do'ru3 
-o' e-tas 
-og' e-nes 
-o-ge' ni-a 
-og' e-nus^ 



Di-og-ne' tus 
Di-o-me' da 
*Di-o-me' des 
Di-o-me' don 
Di' on (3) 
Di-o-nae' a 
Di-o' ne 

Di-o-nys'i-a (11) 
Di-o-ny-si' a-des 
Di-o-nys' i-as (11) 
Di-o-nys' i-des 
Di-o-nys-i-o-do' rus 
Di-o-nys' i-on (11) 
Di-o-ny-sij/ o-lis 
Di-o-nys' i-u8 (11) 
Di-oph' a-nes 
Di-o-phan' tus 
Di-o-pi' tes 
Di-o-poe' nuA 
Di-op' o-lis 
Di-o' res 
Di-o-ry' e-tus 
Di-o-scor' i-des 
fDi-Oi' co-rus 
ipi-o-scu' ri (3) 
Di-os'pa-ge 
Di-os' po-lis 
Di-o-ti'me(l)(8) 
Di-o-ti' mus 
Di-ot' re-phes 
Di-ox-ip' pe 
Di-ox-ip' pus 
Di-paB' ae 
Diph' i-las 
Diph'i*lus 



Di-phoi^i-dai 
IK-poel' tm 
Dip'sas 
Di'r2B 
Dir'ce 
Dir-cen' na 
Dir' phi-a \ 

Dis-cor' di-a 
DIth-y-ram' but 
Dit'a-ui(3) 
Div-i-ti' a-^cus 
Di' VU8 Fid' i-u^ , 
Di-yl'lus 
Do-be' res 
Doc' i-lis 
Doc' i-mus (24) 
Do' cle-a 
Do-do' na 
Dod-o-nae' us 
Do-do' ne 
Do-don' i-des 
Do'i-i(4) 
Dol-a-bel' la 
Dol-i-cha' on 
Dol'i-che(l)(l<>) 
Do'li-us 
Dol70-ine' ^a 
Do' Ion 
Do-lon'ci (3) 
Dol' o-pes 
Do-lo' phi-on 
Do-lo' pi-a 
Do' lops 
Dom-i-du' cus 
Do-min'i-ca 



^Diomedes.-^AW words euding in edes have fb« same accentuation ; as Archi- 
medesy Diomede$j &c. The same may l>e observed of words ending in icles and 
ocles ; as Iphiclesy Damocles, Androeles, &c.-^ee the Terminational Vocabulary*. 

i Dioscona, — ^Anheresiarch of the fi^h century, 

X Dioacuri, — The name given to Castor and Pollux from the Greek Cmq apii 
fi'Vfpi pro K6fOi, the sons of Jove. 



D 3 



58 



DO 



BR 



DY 



Do-mit'i.a (10> 
Do-mit-i-a' nus 
Do-mi f i-an, (Eng.) 
I)oin-i-til' la 
Do-mit'i-us (10) 
Do-na' tus 
Don-i-la'us 
Do-nu' ca 
Do-ny'ssr 
Do-rac'^te 
Do' res 

Dor'i.ca (4) (7) 
Dor' i-cus 

Do-ri-en'ses 
Dor' i-las 
Dor-i-la' us 
Do' ri-on 
Do'ris 
Do-ris'cus 
Do'ri-um 
Do' ri-us 
Do-ros' to-rum 
Dor-sen' nds 
Dor' so 
Do'nis 

Do-r/ a-sus (6) 
Do-r/clus 
Dor-yJae' una, and 
Dor-y-lae' us 
Doif y-las 
Dor-y-la'us 
Do-rys' sus 
Dos'ci (3) 
Do-si'a-des 



Dos-se' nus 
Dot'a-das 
Do' to 
Do' tus 
Dox-an' der 
Dra-ca' nus 
Dra'co 

Dra-con' ti-des 
Dra'cus 
Dran' ces 
Dran-gi-a'na (7) 
Dra'pes 
Drep'a-na, and 
l)rep'a-num 
Drim'a-chus 
Dri-op'i-des 
Dri'os 
Dro'i (3) 
Dro-mas' us 
Drop'i-ci (4). 
Dro'pi-on 
l)ru-en'ti-u8, and 
Dru-en' tia ( 10) 
Dru' ge^ri (3) 
Dru'i-d« 
Dru! ids y (Eng.) 
Pru-sil'la Liv'i-a 
Dru' so 
Dru' sus 
Dry' a-des 
Dry' ads J (Eng.) 
Dry-an-ti' a-des 
Dry-an' ti-des 
Dry-mae' a 



Dry' mo 

Dry' mus 

Dr/ o-pe 

Dry-o-pe'i-* (5) 

Dry'o-pes 

Dry'o-pis, and 

Dry-op' i-da 

Diy ops 

Dryp' e-tis 

Du-ce'ti-us(lO) 

Du-il'li-a 

Du-il'li-us Ne'poa 

Du-lich' i-um 

Dum'no-rix 

Du'nax 

Du-ra'ti-us(lO) 

Dm' ri-us 

i)u-ro'ni-a 

Du-um' vi-ri (4) 

Py-a-gon' das 
Dy-ar-den'ses 
D/mae 
l)y-ma'i (3) 
Dy'mas 

Dy-nam' e-ne 
pyn-sa' te 
Dy'ras(6) 
l)y-ra8'pes 
X)yr-rach' i-um 
py-sau'les 

'ys-ci-ne'tus 

y-so' rum 

ys-pon'ti-i (4) 




EA 



E'a-nes 

E-a'nus 
E-ar' i-nus 
£-a'si-um 



EB 

Eh'do-me 
E-bor'a-cum 
Eb-u-ro' nes 
Eb'u-sus 



ES 

Ec-a-me'da 
Ec-bat'a-na 
Ec-e-chir'i-a, 
Es-e-kir'i-a 



EL 

E-chec' ra-tes 
E-kekf ra-tes 
Ech-e-da'mi-a (30) 
E-cheKa-^tus 
E^hel' ta 
Ech'e-lus 
E-chem' bro-tu^ 
^^ E-che'mon 
Ech'e-mus 
Ech-e-ne' us . 
Ech'e-phron 
E-chep'o-Ius 
E-ches'tra-tiw 
E-chev-e-then' ses 
E-chid' na 
Ech-i-do'rus 
E-chm'a-des 
E-chi'non 
E-chi' nus 
Ech-i-nus'sa 

E-chi'on(29) 

Ech-i-on'i-des 

Ech-i-o'ni-us 

Ech'o 

E-des'sa, E-de'sa 

E-dis^sa 

Fdpn 

E-do'ni (3) 

E-dyl' i-us 

E-e'ti-on(lO) 

]E-gel'i-das 

E-ge' ri-a 

E-ges-a-re'tus 

Eg-e-si'pus 

E-ges' ta 

Eg.na'ti-a(l6) 

Eg-na'ti.us(10) 

E-jo'ne-us 

F-i'onCae) 

E-i' o-nes 

E-i-o' ne-us 

£t-arb(M/ fas 

B-te'a 



E£ 

lE-lae'us 

El'-a-ga-ba'Ius, or 
El-a-gab' a-Ius 
El-a-i'tes 
E-la'i-us 
El-a-phi-ae' a 
EPa-phus 
El*a-phe-boMi-a 
El-ap-to'ui-us 
E-la' ra 
El-a-te' a 
E-la'tus 
E-la' ver 
E'le-a 
E-le-a'te$ 
E-lec'tra 
E-lec' trae 
E-lec' tri-^les 
E-lec' try-on 
E-le'i 
El-e-le'us 
E' le-on 
EI-e-on'tuiB 
El-e-phan'tis 
El-e-phan-toph^ a-gi 
El-e-phe'nor 
El-e-po' rus 
EMe-us 
E-leu'chi-a 
El-eu-sin'i-a^22) 
E-leu'sis 
E-Ieu' ther 
E-leu' the-rae 
El-eu-the'ri-a 
E-leu' tho 
JE-leu-ther-o-cil' i- 

C6S 

E^lic'i-U8 (10) (24) 
EUiren'sis. and 
EJi'a-c^ 

El-i-me'a 

EMis 

I ]glris-phaf 81-1 (4) 

P4 



EN 

Ellis' sa 

EUo'pi-a 

E-lis'stis 

E-lo'rus 

E'los 

El-pe'n#r 

El-pi-ni' ce 

El-u-i'na 

EFy-ces 

El-y-ma' is 

Ery-mi(3) 

El'y-mus 

EFy-rus 

E-lyi'i-um 

E-ma'thi-a 

E-ma'thi-on 
Em'ba-tum 
Em-bo-li' ma 
E-mer'i-ta 
E-mes'sa, and 
E-mis'sa 
Em-me'li-us 
E-mo' da 
E-mo' dus 
Em-ped'o-cles 
Em-pe-rg' mus 
Em-po'clus 
Em-po'ri-a 
Em-pu' sa 
En-cel'a-dus 
En-chel'e-ae (12) 
Eu' de-is 
En-de' ra 
Eri-dym'i-on 
E-ne' ti 
En-g/um * 
En-i-en'ses 
En-i-o'pe-u8 
E-nip' e-us 
E-nis'pe (8) 
En'na 
Ed^ oi-a 
En'ni-ua 



^ 



40 



EP 



ER 



ER 



En'no-mus 

£n-nos-i-gae'us 

En'o-pe 

E'nops 

E'nos 

En-o-sich'thon 

E-not-o-coe'tae 

En-tel'la 

En-teFlu8 

En-y-a' li-us 

E-u/ o (6) 

E'o-ne 

E'os 

E-o'us 

E-pa'gris 

E-pam-i-non^as 

Ep-an-tel'i-i (4) 

E-paph-ro-di''tus 

Ep'a-phus 

Ep-as-nac' tus 

E-pcb'o-lu« 

E-pe'i(3) 

E-pe' us 

Eph'e-sus 

Eph' e-tae 

Eph-i-al'tes 

Eph'o-ri(3) 

Eph^o-rus 

Eph'y-ra 

Ep-i-cas'te 

Ep-i-cer^i des 

Ep-i-cha' i-des 

E-pich'a-ris 

Ep.iH^har'mus 

Ep'i-cles 

Ep-i-cli' des 

E-plc' ra-tcs 

Ep-ic-te'tus 

Ep-i-cu' rus 

E-pic' y-des (24) 

„..$ : — — 

' * JErufaNMC— -Alphens and Eridanus the strong, 

That rises deep^ and stately rolls along. 



Ep-i-dam'nus 

Ep-i-daph'ne 

E-pi-dau 'ria 

Ep-i-dau'rus 

E-pid' i-us 

Ep-i-do'tae 

E-pig'e-ne$ 

E-pig' e-us 

E-pig' o-ni (S) 

E-rpig' o-nus 

E-pi'i, andE-pe'i 

E-pil'a-ris 

Ep-i-meKi-des 

E-pim'e-nes 

Ep-i-men'i-des 

Ep-i-me'the-us 

Ep-i-me' this 

E-pi'o-chus (1^) 

E-pi' o-iie (8) 

E-piph'a-nes 

Ep-i-pha'ni-us 

E-pi' rus 

E-pis'tro-phus 

E-pit' a-des 

E'pi-um 

Ep'o-na 

E-po' pe-us 

Ep o-red'o-rix 

£p>-lo 

E-pyt'i-des 

Ep'y-tus 

E-qua-Jus^ta 

E-quieo-lus 

E-quir'i-a 

E-quo-tu'ti-cum 

Er'a-con 

E-rae'a 

Er-a-si'nus 

Er-a-sip'pus 

Er-a-sis'tra-tus 



lEr'a-to 
ErraTtos^the-neil 
Er-a-tos' tratus 
E-ra'tus 
Er^bes'sus 
Er'e-bus 
E-reph^the-uj| 
E-rem'iri (3) 
E-re'mus 
Er-e-ne'a . 
E-res^sa 
E-rech'thi-des 
E-re'sus 

E-re- tri-a 

E-re'tum 

Er-eu-tha' li-on (?9) 

E/ga-ne 

Er-gen'na 

Er'gi-as 

Er-gi'nus 

Er-gin'nus 

Er-i-boe'a 

E-rib-o-tes 

Er-i-ce' tes 

E-rich'tho 

Er-ich-tho' ni-u^ 

Er-i-cin'i-um 

Er-i-cu'sa 

*E-rid'a-nus 

E-rig'o-ne 

E-rig' o-nus 

Er-i-g/ us 

E-ril'lus 

E-rii/des 

E-rin' na 

E^rin'nys 

E-ri'o-pis 

E-riph' a-ni^ 

E*riph'i-c)as 

Er-i-ph/le 



Cooke's Heiiod. The^f. ▼. 530* 



ES 



EU 



EU 



41 



Fris 

Er-i-sich' thon 
Er^ i-tbus 
P-rix'o 
E-ro' chus 
E-ro'pu8, and 

E'ros 

E-ros' tra-tus 

E-ro'ti-a(lO) 

Er-ru' ca 

Ei^se 

Er'y-mas 

Er'xi-as 

E-ryVi-um 

Er-y-ci'na 

Er-y-man' this 

Er-y-man' thus 

E-rym' nae 

E-rym' ne-u3 

Er'y-mus 

*Er-y-lhe'a 

Er-y.thi'ni{4) 

Er'y-thra 

Er'y-thi^ 

E-ryth'ii-on 

E-ryth'ros 

P'ryx 

E-ryx'o 

E-8ei^nu3 

£s-quil'i-e, and 

Es-qui-li'nus 

Es-sed'o-pes 

iE8'8u.i(3) 

Es'u-la 

jEs-ti-ai'aC?) 



Et-e-a/ chus 

E-te' o-cles 

E-te' o-clus 

Et-e^-cre' tae 

E-te' o-nes 

E-te o'ne-us 

Et-e-o-ni' cus (30) 

E-te'si-aeCn) 

E-tha'li-on («9) 

E-the'le-um 

Eth'o-da 

E-the' mon 

E'ti-as(IO) 

E'tis 

E-tru'ri-a 

Et'y-lus 

E-vad'ne 

Ev'a-ges 

E-vag' o-ras 

E-vag'o-re 

E' van 

E-van' der 

E-vau'ge-lus 

Ev-an-gor'i-des 

E-van'dies 

E-var'chus 

E'vas 

E'vax 

Eu'ba-ges 

Eu-ba'tas 

Eu'bi-us 

Eu-boe'a (7) 

Eu-bo' i-cus 

Eu' bo-te 

Eu'bo-tes 

Eu-bu'le (8) 



Eu-bu'li-des 
Eu-bu' lus 
Eu-ce'rus 
Eu-che^ nor 
Eu' chi-des 
Eu-cli'des 
EuTclidy (Eug.) 
Eu'clus 
Eu' cra-te 
Eu' cra-tes 
Eu'cri-tus 
Euc-te'mon 
Euc-tre'si-i (4) 
Eu-dse^ mon 
Eu-dam'i-das 
Eu'da-mus 
Eu-de' mus 
Eu-do'ci-a 
£u-doc'i-ni!|9 
Eu-do'ra 
Eu-do'rus 
Eu-dox' i-a 
Eu-dox' us 
E-vel' thon 
Eu-e-mer'i-das 
E-vem' e-nis 
E-ve' nus 
Ev-e-phe'nus 
Ev' e-res 
E-ver' ge-t» 
E-ver'ge-tes 
Eu-ga' ne-i (3) 
Eu-ge' ni-a (SO) 
Eu-ge' ni-us 
Eu'ge-on 
Eu'hem' e^rus 



^■^r 



} 



f Etytkea, — Chrysaor, Love the guide, QalUroe led, 
^ Dangjliter of Ocean, to the genial bed. 

Whence Geryon fpning, fierce with hii triple head -, 
Whom Hercules laid breathless on the ground 
1^ En/tkea, wfaicb the wavetf surround, 

QpojUB's Huiod Tkeog. t. 5f 9» 



El/ fay-drum 


Eu-phan'tus 


Eu-ry-crafi-das 


Eu'hv-us 


Eu-phe'ine 


Eu-rjd's-mas 


E-vi|;'pe(S) 


£u-ph^ mus 


Hii-rjd'a-me 


£-vip'pus 


Eu-phor'bus 


Eu-ry-dam'i'daa 


Eu-lL'e-ne 


Eu-pl.o'rion 


Eu-ryd'i-ce 


:Eu.ma'chi-iis{i2) 


Eii-jihfa'iior 


Eii-ry-ga'ni-a 


Eu-mib'us 


Eu-phra' lea 


Eu-ry'le-on 


Eu-me'des 


Eu' phron 


Eu-rjl' o-chu9 


Eu-me'lis 


Eu-phros'T-ne 


Eii-rym' a-chu> 


Eo-me'liu 


Eu-plae'a, or 


Eu-ruii'e-de 


Eu'me-l«s(Kiiig) 


Eu-plre'a • 


Eu-rym' e^on 


*Eii' me-nes 


Eu'po-lis 


Eu-iym'e-nes 


Eu-iiWm-a 


Ell-pom' pus 


Eu-ryn'o-me 


Eu-mwi'i-dea 


Eu-ri-a-nas' sa 


Eu-tyn'o-mus 


Eii-me-nid' l-a 


Ew-rip'i-des 


Eu-ry'o-ne 


Eu-me'ni-us 


Eu-ri' piw 


Eu'ty-.poD 


Eu-niol'pe 


Eu-ro'mus 


Eu-ryp'y-le 


Ea-mol'pi-dae 


Eu-ro'pa(7) 


Eu-oyy-lus 


Eu-mol'pus 


Eu-ro-pae'us 


Eu-rj8'the^ne» 


Eu-inon'i-dca 


Eu'rops 


Eu-rys-then'i-d« 


Eu-nEe'ii9 


Eu'ro-pu8 


Eiwys'the-us 


Eu-na'pi-us 


Eu-ro'tBS 


Eu'ry-te 


Eu-Do'mi-» 


Eu-ro'to 


Eu-ryt'e-» 


Eu'Do-mua 


Eu'ms 


Eu-ryfelle 


Eu'nus 


Eu-iya-le (8) 


Eu-tyth'e-mis 


Eu'ny-mos 


Eu-i/a-luB 


Eu-ryth'i-du, M 


Eu'o-ras 


Eu-ryb* a-tes 


Eu-ryl^iron(ll) 


Eu-pa'gU.m 


Eu-ryl/i-a 


Eu' iy-tU8 


Eu-pai's-mon 


Eu-ry-bi' a-d<'fi • 


Eu'ry-tia 


Eu-pal'a-inus 


Eu-iyb'i-u9 


Eu-se'bi-a 


Eu'pa-lor 


Eu-ry-cle'a 


Eu-ie'bi-u» 


Eu-pa-to'ri-a 


Ei/rj-cles 


Eu'se-pui 
Eu-sta'^lhi-us 


Eu-pei'thes 


Eu-ry-cli'des 


Eu'pba-et 


En-iyc'ra-te» 


Eu-sto'U-a 



• F.ysBom.—lt it nota little aurprifing diit lo elegant diwiterat Hiighei 
Bbonld, throughont tbe whole tragedy of tlie Si<|« ^ nanauois, accent this 
word on Uie pEaaitimale sjnable^ esped^ m Ikere is aot a lingU pnper 
aaae of more than two gytbblra in the Greek or Latni lani^iages of tbii tennl. 
Bulion which liat th* pKnnltimate syllsble long.— Lee has done the isme in the 
tragedy of -d'tawndn-, whieh worfd lead ii« to suppose there is lomething lutih 
D Eogliih ear te the aatepenultimate a^ntnitian of theiQ 



% I 



£U 

£u-sto'li-us 

Eu-t«'a(7) 

£u-tel' i-das 

Eu-ter'pe 

*Eu-tha' li-a 

Eu-thaMi-us 

Eu-thyd'ra-tes 

Eu-thy-de'mu& 



EU" 

Eti-th/mus 
Eu'-trap'e-Ius 
Eu-tro' pj-a 
Eu-tro' pL-us 
Eu' ty-ches 
Eu-tych' i-de 
Eu-tych'i-de3 
Eu^ty-phroQ 



EX 



43 



Eu'Xan'thi-us 
Eux^e-nus 
Eu-xi'nus Poi|'tu«f 
Eu-xip^pe . 
Ex-a' di-U8 
Ex-ae'thes 
Ex-ag' Ormis 
Ex-om'a^trs 



■^f 



riMi 



ivaMi 



FA 

F ab'a-ris 
Fa' bi-a (7) 
Fa-bi-a'ni (3) 
Fa^i-i (4) 
Fa'bi-us 
Fab-ra^te'ri-a 
Fa-bric'i-us (24) 
Fi-bul'Ia 
Fa' dus 
Faes'u-Jfft 
Fal-cid'i-a 
FaJe'ri-i (4) 
Fal-e-ri'na 
" Fa-Ier'nus 
Fa-lis'ci (3) 
Fa-lis'cus • 
, Fa' ma 
Fan'ni-a 
Fan' ni-i (4) 
Fan'ni-us 
Fai^fa-ni8 
Fafl'ce-iis 
Fas-eel' ii-na 
Fau-cu' i-a 



FE 

Fa.ven'ti-a(10) 

Fa-ve'ri-a 

Fau' la 

Fau'na 

Fau«'iia'li-a 

Fau'ni (3) 

Fau'nus , 

Fa'vo 

Fau'sta 

Fau-sti'na (3) 

Fau' sti-tas 

Fau'stu-lus 

Fau' tus 

Feb' ni-^ 

Fec-i-a' les 

Fel'gi-uas 

Fen-es-tel'la • 

Fe-ra' li-a 

Fer-en-ta'num, and 

Fe-ren'tum 

Fe-re'tri-us 

Fe-ro'ni-a 

Fes-cen'ni-^ 

Fes' tus 



Fi 

Fi-bre'lius 
Fi-cul'ne-a 
Fi-de'na 
Fi-de'nae 
Fi-deo'ti-^ 
Fi'des 
Fi-dic'u-la 
Fim' bri-a ^ 

Fir'mi-us 
Fis-cel'lus 
Fla-cel'li-a 
Flac'cus 

Fla-cil'laiE'li-* 
Fla-mii/i-a 
Fla-min' i-us, or 
Flam-i-oi'oui 
Fla'vi-a 
Fla-vi-a'num 
Fla-vin^ i-a 
Fla-vi-ob'ri-ga 
Fla' vi-us 
Flo'ra 
Flq-ra'li-a 
Fla' rds 



1**- 



* Euthdlia, Labbe elieerves, that this word doe* sot come from the most 
Tftotia, as some sappose, bat from the masculine BiiiHdlius, as Evlitiia^ JEvmimMf 
BuatoUOf Buiropia^ EnmdUif &c«9 which are pro&die^ accdHtftd on the antep*^ 
2imltimate.--See Rule 29. 



44 



FR 



FU 



FU 



Flo-ri-a' nus 
Flu-o' ni-a 
Fo'li-a 

Fon-te'i-a (5) 
Fon-te'i-us Cap'i-to 
For'mi-ae 
For-mi-a'num 
For'nax 
For-tu'na 
For'u.li 
Fo'rum Ap'pi-i 
Fran' ci (3) 
Fre-gel' la (7) 
Fre-ge'nae 



Frcn-ta'ni (3) 
Frig'i-dus 
Fri?i-i(4) 
Fron'ti-nus 
Fron'to 
Fm' si-no 
Fu-ci' na 
Fu-ci' nus 
Fu-fi(fi-u8 
Fu'fi-us Gem'i-nus 
Ful-gi-na' tes 
Ful-gi' nus 
Ful'Ti-num, and 
Ful'gi-num 



1 



FuFvi*a 
FuK vi-us 
Fun-da' nus 
Fun'di (3) 
Fu' ri-a 
Fu' ri-ae 
Fu'ri-i(4) 
Fu-ri' na 
Fu^ri' nae 
Fu' ri-us 
Fui'' ni-us 
Fus' cus 
Fu'si-a (11) 
Fu'si.us(10) 



sz 



"ir 'n ^; 



TTJ! 



GA 



ji' 



Cjtab'a-les 
Gab' a-za 
6a-be'ne^ and 
Ga-bi-c'ne 
Ga-bi-e' nus 
Ga'bM(4) 
Ga-bi'na 
Ga-bin'i-a 
Ga-bin*-i-a' nus (20) 
(7a-4iiQ'i-us 
Ga'deSy and 
Gad^i-ra 
Gad-i-ta'nus 
Gae-sa'tse 
Gae-tu'li-a 
Gae-tu' li-cus 
fea-la'bri-i (4) 
Galrac-toph' a-gi (3) 
(t^a-las'sus 
£larlan' thia 



GA 

Gal'a-ta(7) 
Gal'a-tae 
Gal-a-ts'a, and 
Gal-a-thae'a 
Ga-la'ti-a(lO) 
Ga-lax' i-a 
Gal'ba 
Ga^le' nus 
Ga-le'oJaB 
Ga^le' ri*a 
Ga-le' ri-us 
Ga-le' sus 
Gal-i-te'a 
Ga-lin-thi-a' di;-s| 
Gal'U (3) 
Gal'li-a 
Gal-li-ca'nus 
Galrli-e'nu» 
Gal-li-oa'ri-a 
Gal-lip' o.li» 



GA 

GaWo-grae'ci-a 
GaUo' ni-us 
GaKlus 
Ga-max' us 
Ga-me' li-a 
Gan-da-ri' txt 
Gan'ga-nfo 
Gan-gar' i-dae 
Gan'ges 
Gan-nas' cus 
Gan-y-me'de 
Gan-y-me'dei 
Gan' y-medey (Eng.) 
Ga-rae'i-cum 
Gari-a-man' tes 
Gar-a-man'tis 
Gar^ a-mas 
Gar'a-tas 
Ga-re'a-t« 
Ga-re-nth'y-ni 



GE 

*Gar-ga'mi3 

Ga>'ga-«, (7) 

Gai-'ga-ris 

Ga-ril' i-us 

Gar-git' ti-us 

Gar-i' les 

Ga'nim'na 

Gas'tron 

Galh'e-a(4) 

Ga-the'a-tas 

Gau'lus, Gau'le-OD 

Gau' ras 

Ga'usj Ga'os 

Ge-bei/na (9) 

Ge-dro'si-a(ll) 

Ge^'m-i (4) 

Ge'la 

Ge-la'nor 

Gel'1i-a 

Gel'ii-as 

GeV Ii-U8 

Ge'lo, Ge'lon 

Ge'Io-i(3) 

Ge-lo'nea, Ge-lo'ci 

Ge^los 

Ge-mWi-us 

Gem'i-nus < 

Ge-na' biQii 

Ge-ttau'ni 

Ge-ntf" na 

Ge-ni'suB 

Ge'ni-iis 

Gen'se-ric 

Gerfti-usXIO) 

Gen'u-a 

Ge-nu'ci-iu (10) 

Ge-Qu' lus 

Ce.im'ti-a(Il) 



GL 

Ge-oi' ri-ca 

Geor'gw, (Eng.) 

Ge-phyra 

Ge-(>l.vr'a^i(3) 

Ge-ra'm-a 

Ge-ran' ihne 

Geres' ti-cus . 

Gei'gi-ihuin (9) 

Ger-grfbi-a 

Ge'ri-on 

(jer-ma'ni-a 

Ger-ma'ni-i (4) 
Ge-ron' dine 
Ger' rha 
Ge'nifl, and 
Ger'rhiis 
Gt''ry-on(9), and 

Ges'sa-tie 

Ge^sus 

Ge'la (9) 

Ge'tte 

Ge-tu'Ii-a 

Gi-|;an'tes 

Gi-gar'tum 

Gi-gb 

Gifdo 

GU'lo 

Gin-da'net 

Gii/dea 

Gin'ge 

Gtn-gu'nura 

Gip'|>i-us 

Giffco 

GJa-di-a-to'ri-i(4) 

Gla'nis 

Glaj)h'y-re, and 

Gkph'j-ra 



GO 4^ 

Glaph'y-nis 

Glau'ce 

Glau-df/pe 

Glau-dp^pus 

Glau'c<»i 

Glau-con'i>-iM 

Glau-co'pis 

Giau'ciu 

Glau'ti-as 

Gli'con 

Glis'sas 

Glyc' e-ra 

Giy-ce'ri-um 

Giy con 

Glym' pel 

Giia'ti-a(l3)(10) 

Gni'diu 

Gnos'si-a (10) 

Gnos' sis 

Gnos'siu 

Gob-ft-nit'i-o (10) 

Gi/bar 

Gob' a-res 

Gob'rj'-as 

Gol'gi 

Gonfphi 

Go-oa'tas 

Go-ni*a-de8 

Go-nip'' pus 

Go-noes^sa 

Go-nils' n 

Gor-di-a'nus 

Gor* di-um 

Gor' di-us' 

Gor-ga'fflis 

Goi'ge (8) 

Gor'gi-aa 

GoKgo 

Gor'go-nes 



* Cii)Y«nu.T Andliii^ Ga>]p»nM, on tb' Apulian plain, 

I( mark'd bjMilore fron ihe iliitaut nain, 

WlLKIB, EjriroMMrf. 



46 



GR 



Gor-go^ni-a 

Gor-go'ni-us 

.Gor-goph'o-ne 

Gor-goph'o-ra 

Gor'gus 

Gor-g^'i-pn 

Gor'tu-ae 

Gor'tyn 

Gor'tys 

Gor-^na 

Gor-tyn' i-a 

Gol^thi (3) 

Gnw/chus (12) 

Gra-di'vus 

Grvfci(3) 

Gra^ci-a(ll) 

Graei^d-a Mag'iia 

Grae-ci'nua 

Grae' cus 



GR 

Gra' i-us 

♦'Gra-ni'cus, or 

Gran'i-cus 

Gra'ni-us 

Gra'ti-aB(lO) 

Gra-ti-a'Dus(21) 

Gra-tid' i-a 

Gra'ti-on(n) 

Gra'ti-.us(10) 

Gra'vi-i (4) 

Gra-vis'caj 

Gra'vi-u8 

•Gre-go'ri-us 

■G rinses 

:Gro'phus 

Gryl'lus 

Gry-ne' uqi 

;Gry-ne'us 

Gry-ni' mn 



GY 

G/a-rus, and 

G/a-rog 
G/as 
Gy-gae'us 
G/ge 
G/ges (9) 
G/es 
Gy-lip'pus 
Gym-na^si-a(l]) 
Gym-na'si-um (11) 
Gym-ne'si-ae (11) 
Gym'ne-tes 
Gym-nos-o-phU' tar 
Jim-no/ O'phists, 

(Ena;.) (9) 
Gy-nae' ce-as 

Gyn-ae^co-tboe' nas 
G jTi' des 

Gy-the'um» 



m^mmfsamtmsifsfms^ 



a|=*=9p?i 



HA 

xIa'bis 

Ha-dii^-nop'o-Iis 

Ha-dii-a' nus (23) 

Ha-dri-at'i-cum 

Hae^mon 

Has-mo'ni-« 

Hsi^mus 

Ha'ges 

Hag' no 

Hag-nag' o-:ra 

Ha-lae'sus, and 



HA 



Ha-le'sus 
jHal'a-la 
JHal-c/ o-ne (8) 
(HaMes 

JHa-le' si-US (11) 
Ha'li-a 

Ha-li-ac'mon(Sl) 
Ha-li-artus(21) 
Hal-i-car-na/ sus 
Ha-lic'y-«(U) (84) 
Ha-li'e-is 



HA 

Ha-lim'e-de 

Hal-ir-rho'ti-us (10) 

Hal-i-tfaei^sus 

Ha' li-us (90) 

Hal-i-zo'oes(2]) 

Hal'mus 

Hal-my-de2{'sii8 

Ha-lo(/ ra-tjBA 

Ha-lo'ne 

Hal-on-ne!^au8 

Ha-lo'ti-a(lO) • 



* GromcMA— As Alezander's passing the mer OrMkua is a coiqmon subject 
of history, poetry, and pabting, it is pot wonderfbl that the common ear shonlil 
have given into a pronunciation of this word more a({reeable to English analogy 
than the true classical accent on the penultimate syllable. The accent on the 
first syUable is now so fixed, as to make the other prommciation savour of pe- 
dantry.— See Andrmijeui* 



HE 



HE 



HE 



Ha-lo'tu8 
Ha'lus 
Hal-y-ae' tus 
Hal-y-at' tes 
Ha'lys 

Ha.lyz'i-a{ll) 
Ham-a-dr/a-des 
Ha-max^i-a 
Ha-mil' car 
Ham'moa 
Hai/ni-bal 
Hkr'ca-lo 
Har-4na-teMi-a 
Har^ma-tris 
Ha-milMus 
Har-mo' di*ut 
Har-ma' m-a 
Har-mon' i-dea 
Hai^pt-^ 
Har-paF i-ce 
Har-pa'li-on 
Hai^pa-lu8 
Har-paF y-^ (8) 
Har-pal'y-iciis 
Hai^pa-sa 
Ha/pa-sDS 
Har-fpoc'ra-^tes 
Har-p/i-BB (4) 
Ha/pieSy (Eng.) 
Ha-ru'spex 
Has'dru-bal 
Ha-te'ri-us 
i Hau^sta-nes 
Heb' do-Ie 
He' be (8) 
He-be' SU8 



He' brus 
Hec' a-le 
Hec-a-le' si-a 
Hec-a-me' de 
Hec-a-t%' us 
Hec'a-te (8), or 
Hecf ate, (Eng.) 
Hec-a-te'jsi-a (11) 
Hec-a*tom-b</ i«a 
Hec-a-tom-phc/ ni-a 
Hec-a - torn' po-lk 
Hec-a-tom' py-los 
Hec' tor 
Hec' o-ba 
Hed'i-la 
He-don' a-cum 
Hed' u-i (3) 
He-dym' e-les 
He-gef o-chiu 
*He-ge' mon 
Heg-e-si'nus 
Heg-eHH'fr-nax 
He-gef'fi-as 
Heg-e-sil' o-dius 
Heg-e-sin'o-us 
Heg-e-sip'pus 
Heg-e^wp'y-ie 
Heg-e-sis' tra-tus 
H^-e-toi^ i-des 

Hel'e-na(7) 

He-le'ni-a 

He-3e'nor 

Hel'e-niw 

He-ler'ni Lai'cus 

He-li'a-des 

He-li-as' tae 



Hel-i-ca' on 
Hel'i-ce 
Hel'i-con 
Hel-i-co-ni' a-des 
Hel-i-co' nis 
He-li-o-do' rus (€ 1 ) 
+He^li-o-^a-ba' Jus 
He-li-op'o-Iii 
He-lis'sen 
He'li-U8 
He-lix'us 
iHe-lan'i-ce 
He-lan' i-cu9 
Hel-la-noe' ra4e9 
Herias 
Hene(8) 
Hel'lea 
Hel-le'nes 
HeI-Ie-i^n'tii8 
Hel-lo'pi-a 
Hel-lo'ti.a(10) 
He-lo'ris 

He-lo'rum, find 

Herlo'rus 

He'los 

He-lo'tae, and 

He-lo'tes 

Hel-ve'ti-a(JO) 

Hel-ve' tU (4) 

Hel'vi-a 

Hel'vi.i(4) 

Hel-vi'na 

Hel'vi-us Cin'na 

He'lum 

HeFy-miw 

He-m&' thi-on 



« Higemon,-^oaldnmn and Holyoke accent t^ vord on the antepenultimate 
syllable, but Labbe and Lemffriere more claasically on the penultiDiate. 

t Heliog0MuM^--'T\m word.is accented on the penultimate syllable hy Labbe 
apd.|iempriere ; bat in my opimon more agreeably to the general ear by Ain^ 
i^octh, OooldBwi^ aad Holyoke, on the intepomUtimate. 



48 HE 

He-mitV e-a 
He'moti 
He' tnus 
Hen'e-ti (S) 
He-ni'o-chi (3) 
He-pbati'ti-a 
He-plies' ti-i (4) 
He-phW ti-o 
He-phies'ti-on(ll) 
Hep-ta-pho' aoa 
Hep-tap'o-lis 
Hep-tap' y-los 
He'ra(7) 
Her-a-cle' a 
Her-a-cle'i-a 



He- 



c'Je- 



He-rac-le-o' tea 

Her-a-cli'de 

Her-a-cU'dii 

Her-a-cU' des 

*Her-B-cli'tuB 

He-nic'li-us 

He-ra'a 

He-r«' um 

Ilcr-bea'sus 

Her-ce'Mis 

Her-cu-la' ue-um 

Her'cu-les 

Her-cu' le-um 

Her-cu'Ie-us 

Her-c/na 

Her-cjn' i-a 

Her-do'ni-a 

Her-do'ni-ii» 

He-ren'ni-us Se-ne' 

ci-o 
He' re-US 
He-ril'lu9 



HE 

Her'i-lug 

Her'ma-chtu 

Her'tus 

Her-ms' a 

Her-nwE^ um 

Her-mag'o-ras 

Her-niHD-du' ri 

Her-miiii' ni 

H er-ina pli- ro-di' tua 

Her-ma-Uie' na 

Her-nte^as 

H,-r-.ne'i-as 

Hei' mes 

H er-me-si' a-nas 

Hcr-iiiiii'i-us 
Her-mi'o-ne 
Her-ffli-o' ni-te 
Her-mi-on'i^ua Si* 

DU3 

Her-mip' pilS 

Her-moc'ra-les 

Her-mo-do' rua 

ITer-mog'e-nes 

Her-nio-la'u9 

Her-D.o-ti'.nus 

Her-UHHi-du'ri 

Her'mus 

Her' Ohci (4) 

He'ro 

He-ro'des 

He-ro-di-a' nus (2 1 ) 

He-rod' i-cus 

He-rod' o-tus 

Her'o-es 

He-ro' is 

He'ro!! 

Ue-roph' i-la 



HI 

He-roph'iJi» 
He-fas' tra-tur 
Her* pa 
Hei^se 
Her-sit'i-a 
HeKtha, and 

Her'u 
Hei'u-ii 
He-«e'Diig 
He-u'o-dus 
//e'zAe-od[Eng.K10) 
He-si' o-ne 
Hea-pe'ri-a 
Hes-pe!' i-dea 
Hea'pe-ria 
Hes-per'i-tis 
Hea'pe-nis 
Hes'ti-a 
He*-ti-w'«(7). 
He' am 
He-sych' i-a 
He-s\ch'i-!is 
H*-tric'u-tum 
He-tru' ri-« 
Heu-rip'pa 
Hex-ap'y-lum 
Hi-be/ ni-a, b!h1 

Hy-beKni-a 
Hi-biii'des 
Hic-e-U'(Hi(24) ■ 
Ha-e-ta'oK 
Hi-ce'tas 
Hi-emp'aal 
Hi'e-ra 
Hi-e-rap'o-Ua 
Hi' e-rax 
Hi'e-ra 
Hi-e-ro-ce' i»-a 



gifins the auIepniultiouM 
fonoef wonL 



of the wepping pliilusoylicr is so (i-pquently pon- 
tus, the laughing pliilusopher, tliut wr ure ipt to 
^ acc^fut bat all 'OUr prutoduts nre uniform in 
icewl l» the latt«r, ni 



HI 



HI 



HO 



49 



Hi-cr' o-cles 
Hi-e-ro-duMum 
Hi-er-om' ne-mon 
Hi-e-ronVsos 
HU-ron'i-ca (30) 
Hi-er-on'i-cus 
Hi-e-ron'y-mus 
Hi-e-roph^ i-lu8 
Hi-e-ro-8ol' y-ma 
Hig-na'ti.aVi'a 
Hi-Wri-a 
Hi-la' ri-us 
Tfi-meria 
Him' e-ra 
Hi-mil'co 
Hip-pag' o-ras 
Hip-pal' ci-mu8 
Hip'pa-lus 
Hip-par' chi-a (1£) 
Hip.par'chus 
Hip-pa-ri'nus 
Hip-pa' ri-on 
Hip' pa-9us 
Hip'pe-us . 
Hip' pi (3) 
Hip' pi-a 
Hip'pi-as 
Hip' pis 
Hip' pi-US 
Hip'po 



Hip-pob'o-tes 
Hip-pob'o-tus 
Hip-po-cen-tau' ri 
Hip-poc'o-on 
Hip-po-cor-ys' tes 
Hip-poc'ra-tes I 

Hip-po-cra'ti-^a (U) 
*Hip-po-cre'ne (7) 
Hip-pod' a-mas 
Hip.pod'a-me 
Hip-p6-da-mi'a (30) 
Hip-pod' a-mus 
Hip-pod'i-ce 
Hip-pod' ro-mus 
Hip' po-la 
Hip.pol' O-chus 
Hip-pol'y-te (8) 
Hip-pol'y-tus 
Hip-^m'a-chus 
Hip-pom'e-don 
Hip-pom' e-ne 
Hip-pom' e-nes 
Hip-po-mol'gi 
Hip'pon^and Hip'po 
Hip-po'na 
Hip^ po-nax 
Hip-po-ni'a-tes 
Hip-po'ni-um 
Hip-pon'o-us 
Hip-pop' o-des 



Hip-pos'tra-tus 
Hip-potfa-des 
Hippo-tasi or 

Hip'po-tes 
Hip-potih'o-cf 
Hip-poth^o-oii 
Hip-poth-o-on^ tisi 
Hip-poth' o-us 
Hip-po^ti-on(ll) 
Hip-pu'ris 
Hip' pus 
Hip' M-des 
Hi^ra 

Hir-pi'ni (4) 
Hir-pi'nusy Q. 
Hi/ti-a(10) 
Hir'ti-ufl Au'lus 
Hir'tus 
His^bon 
His-pa'ni-a 
His-pel'lum 
His^po 
His-pul'la 
His-tas'pes 
His' ter Pa-cu'vi-un 
His-ti-ae'a 
His-ti-ae'o-tis 
His-ti-«' us 
His'tri-a 
Ho'<li-us 



* HtppocrciM.— Nothing can be better established than the prontmdation i|^ 
this word ip four syUables aecording to its original; and yet such is the licence 
of English poets, that they not nnfreqaently contract it to three. Thai Cookb^ 
Heiiod. Theog, v. 9. 

And now to Hippocreme resort the iiur ; 
Or, Ohnius, to thy sacred spring repair* 

And a late trinshtor of the Satires of Persiiis ;-— ^ 

Never did J so mnch as sijp^ 
Orwetwitfa£ftfi|NMTMealip« ^ 

This contraction ii^kiexcuMblfi as it tends to eaibanraii prommtetiony •nd'low« 
er the laBgua|e of poctiy* 



^ 



4it 



HoFo-fcrort 

Ho-me'rfe 

Ho'mer. (Etig.) 

Hom'o-fe 

Homo' lea 

Honi-o-lip'pas 

Honi-o-lo'i-des 

H o-ni ori-a-dJ4i''se'9 

Ho-Ai'H-tis 

Ht/ia 

Ho-nic'i-ta iJ84) 

H</r» 

Hor-a-pol'lo 

Ho-ra'ti-us 

Hoi^ci-as (16) 

Hor-riik'dils 

Ho-ra' tus 

Hor-teu'si-a ^(f) 

Hor,ti'num 

Hor-teii'S-Us tlV>) 

Hor-to'na 

Ho'nis 

Hos-tiJ'i-a 

H&-fin-ua 

Hun-ne-ri'Ais 

Hun-niTi-dfes 

Hy-a-cm''fiii.a 

Hj-a-cin' dills 

fa-des 
ag^ms 
a^a 
an'tnes 
Hy-an'tis 
HyVbi-ta 
Hy'as 
Hy'bla 
•Hy-bre'aa, or 



ttV 

, Hyb'hs-as 

Hy-bri'a-hes 

Hjc'cn-Va 

11/ da, and Hyde 

Hyii'a-ra 

Hy-dai'ries 

Hy-das/ pes 

Hy'dra 

Hy-dra'hii-a (30) 



-dj*a-o'tes 



Hy-droch' 

Hy-dro^piio'H-a 

Hy dnis 

Hy dru'sa 

H/e-la, 

Hy-errfp'sal 

Hy-et'tUB 

Hy-ge'i-a 

Hy-gi'a-na 

Hy-gi'liiiis 

H/fa.&ndH/to 

Hy-Iac'i-des 

Hy-lac' tor 

Hy-lfe'm 

Hy'lte 

JHyl-la'i-cUs 

Hy-loii' o-me 

By'tn-e-iise'iis, aiid 

Hy'men 

Hy-met'tiis 

H>-W'pti 

'Hy-pVsi4(il5 

Hyp' s-Hft 

Hyp-a-ri'nus 



Jly-pa'les 

Hyp'a-tfta 

Hy pe'hor 

Hy-pe-rS'on 

Hy-per' bi-iia 

Hyp-er-lio're-i 

Hy-pe' *-e-a, ^ia& 
Hy-pfe'Vi-*4 
lyp-e-re'si-a (n> 
ly-ptei^i-des 
ly-pe-ri'on(3d) 

Hyp-erm-rtes'tra 

Hj-jier'o-cbus 

Hy-i)er-och'i-des 

Hy-phaii'ua 

Hyp'sa 

Hyp-de'ft 

Hyp-sf'nor 

tfj^-se^as 

Hyp-si-cra-te'a 

Hypsic'rates 

Hypsip'y-le 

Hyr-ca'ni-a 

Hyr-ca'num'ina'i-e 

Hyr-ca'nuS 

Hyr'i-a 

Hy-ri e-us, and 
Hyr'e-us 

Hyr-mi'na 

Hyr'ne-to, and 
Hyr'ne-dio 

HVr-'nitli'i-'uni 

fKta-cu^ 
„s'i-a(lO 
Hya'jw 
Hyr'sua, and 
Hys'si (3) 
Hys-fte'TJCB 
Hys-ti-c ua 



■ Hybrwu.— Lemprieie acccnti tlils wonl ou Ule-pmaltiinata sjllnUe; but 
lAbbe, QoaldDUU>i end Holjrohe, more propeily, on tbe Bat^aultimatt. 



< 51 ) 



I'A 

-ac/ chus 
-a'der 
-a-le^ams 
-al' ine-aii0 
-^1' y-sus 
-anrbe 
-am'Ui^c|£s 
-am' e-nus 
-am' i'die 
a-nic'u-Inin 
-a-ni' ra 
-an' the 
-an'the^ 
a'nuB 

*I-ap'iMH» 
-a'pis 

-a-pyg'h^ 
-a'pyx 

!W«€baSy smnI 



IC 



ID 



Jai^chas 


Ich-o^Mi'j[Ais 


I-ar'da-nus 


Ich-thy-qph^rgi (S) 


I-as'i-des 


Ich'thys 


I-a'si-OH (1 1), m4 


I-cil'i-us . 


I-a' si-US 


Ic'i.us (10) 


Ja' son 


r cos 


r a-su^ 


Ic-ti'qus 


J.be'ri 


Fda 


I-be'ri-a 


I-dse'a 


I-be'rus 


I-daB'us 


r bi (3) 


Id' akis 


I'bis 


Id-ari-thyr'stis 


Ib'y-cq^ 


I-dar'nes 


I-ca'ri-a 


I'das 


I-ca'ri-us 


tld'e-a.(«8) 


Ic'a-rus 


I-des'sa 


Ic'ci-us (PQ) 


I-dit-a-ii's(i9 


Ic'e-los 


Id'mon 


I-ce'ni 


I-dom'e-ne(8) 


Ic'e-tas 


I-dom-e-ne' us, or 


loh'naB 


jll-doaoi'^-neus 


lch^iBu'«a 


I-cdo'the-^a 



lapetw.- 



-Son of rdpeku, o^er^nbtle ^ 



Atid^atf uk tiQT artCtil i^ieft JbeloEnr.- 

t Jdea.T-Tbis word, as a proper name, I find in no lexu:oj[xaph«ribut Lem*> 
priere* 9l 

The Engliiih ;»ppellati^7^gmfying an im0gein.thejnind,.has Kiniformly the ac- 
cent on the second syllable^as in the 'Greek {^la in opposition to the JLatin^ which 
tiiejgenenilly follow in other cases, and which, in this word, has the ,penultin^te 
MnHi't, in Aidswortii, 3LAhbe,4uid our best prosodists ; ^nd, according to this aqa- 
io^^, idea ou^t to hstve the accent on the first syllable, and thatByllable short, 
BS'^e 'first of idiot, ' But when this word is a proper name, as the daughter of 
t>ardanns, I should suppose it ought to fall into the general analogy of pronounc- 
ing Greek names, not by accent, but by quautity ; and therefore, that it ought 
Ho^Mlveillieiacoeiit on tlie.'fiMt syllable; and, accordmgto onrown analo^sy, tliat 
fiyUile. wght ^o ^be*lAiort, hbIoss the^ponnltiniate in the Greek is;a diphthong 
and then, acconiling'to.geBeval mage, it ought to h^ve the accent. 

I Idomeneiu. — The termhiation of nouns in eus was, among the ancients, some- 
time pronoaqced iir^t^o«ylkililes^4md8ometiines, as a diphthong, in one. Thus 

£2 Labbo 



52 



IL 



IL 



IN 



I-dri' e-u8 

l-du' be-da 

I-du' me, and 

Id-u-me' a 

I-d/i-a 

Jen'i-sus 

Je'ra 

Je-ro' mus, and 

Je-ron'y-mus 

Je-ru' salem 

1-e' tae 

Ig'e-ni 

Ig-na'ti-us (10) 

Il-a-i'ri 

Il'ba 

ll-e-ca' o-nes, and 

^1-e-ca-o-nen' ses 

I-Iei^da 

iri-a,orRhe'a 

I-li'a-ciLu'di(3) 

I-li' a-cus 



I-li'a-des. 
Il'i-as 
Il'i-on 
I-li'o-ne 
Il-i-o' ne-us, or 
*I-li' o-neus 
1-lis'sus 
I-lith.yri'a 
U'i-um, or 

iri-on^ 
IMib' e-ris 
Illip'u-la 
lUli-tur'gis 
IJ-lyr'i-cum 
II' ly-ris, and 

Il-lyi' i-a 
ll-lyr'i-cusSi'nus 
Il-lyi^ i-us 
II' u-a (7) 
I-lyr' gis 
rius 



I-man-a-en' ti-us 

(10) 
+Im'a-us 
Im'ba«-rus 
Im-brac^i-des 
Ira-bras' i-de» 
Im' bra-sus 
Im' bre-us 
Im' bri-us 
Im-bri/i-imi 
Jm' bros 
In'a-chi(3)(12) 
I-na^chi-a 
I-nacli'i-dse 
I-nach'i-des 
I-na' chi-um 
In'a-chus(12) 
I-nam' a-mes 
I^-nai' i-m€ (8) 
In' a-ru» 
In-ci-ta'tus 



liabbe tells us, that AchiUeus, Agyteiis, Phalereus, Apnrte^f are pronomicecl 
commonly in four syllables, and JVtreic^, Orpheus, Porteua, Tereiitf in three, vith 
the penultimate syllable short in all j but tbat these words, when in verse, have 
f enerally tlie diphthong preserved in one syllable : 

Ettiuenidum veluti demons videt agmina Penthens.- — ^Virg. 

He observes, however, that the Latin poets very frequently diisohred the diph- 
thong into two syllables : 

Naiadmn ccetn, tantum non Orpheiis Hebmm 
Pcenaque re8pectus,et nnnc manet Orpheiis in te« 

The best rule, therefore, that can be given to an English reader is, to pronounce 
wordf of this termination always with the vowels separated, except an English 
poet, in iiaitation of the Greeks, should preserve the diphthong: but, in the pre* 
sent wofcl, I should prefer I-d^m'e-neuM to I-iom-e^iUf whether in verie or 
pro^; 

* SttJdameMiak 

t /imiiis.-'-AJtt^i^resodisti Aiake the penultimate sylkible of this wofd short, 
and consequent HCiitent it. 09 die aiitepi^nltinialt $ but Milton, by a lioenee 
he was allowed tc^ |ike, accents k dn t|[pf«nultunatc syllable : 
As \01M^ a vultur^ Mi /imiis bred. 
Whose tnowy rid^ tt% rofiiq| Tartar bounds 



IN' 



lO 



IP 



53 



In-da-thyi^ sus 
In'di-a 
In-<lig^ e-tes 
Iii^g'e-ti(S) 
In'dus 
rno(l) ' 
I-no'a (7) 
I-no'pus 
I-no^ us 
I-no^res 
In'«u-bres 
In-taph^r^nes 
In-te-ram' na 
h-ter-ca' ti-a (11) 
In' u-us 
I-n/ cus 



I' 0(1) 

I-ob'a-tes^ and 

Jo-ba'tes 

r o-bes 

Jo-cas' ta 

I-o-la'J-a 

F o-las, or . 

I-o-la'us 

I-ol'chos 

ro-le(l)(8) 

I'on 

I-o'ne(8) 

I-o'nes 

I-o'ni-a 

I-o' pas 

Fo-pe, and 



Jop'pa 
Fo-phon 
Jor-da' nes^ 
Jor-nan'des 
Fos 

Jo-se'phqs Fla'vi-up 
Jo-vi-a' nus 
Jo' vi-^n (Eng.) 
Ip'e-paB 
Iph-i-a-nas'sa 
Iph' i-clus, or 
yiph'i-cles 
I-pnic' ra-tes 
I-phid' a-mus 
Iph-i-de-mi' a 
*Iph-i-ge-m' a 



* Jphigenia,-—ThR antepenultimate syllable of this word had *been in quiet 
possession of the accent for more than a century, till some Greeklings of late 
have attempted to place the stress on the penultimate in compliment to the ori- 
ginal l^yivua. If we ask our innovators on what principles they pronounce thif 
word with the accent on the i, they answer, because the i stands for the diph-^ 
thong f(, which, being long, must necessarily have the accent on it: but it may ' 
be replied, this was indeed the case in the Latin language, but not in the Greek, 
where we find a thousand long penultimates without the accent. It is true, one 
of the vowels which composed a diphthong in Greek, when this diphthong was 
in the penultimate syllable, generally had an accent on it, but not invariably ; for 
"a long penultimate syllable did not always attract the accent in Greek as it did 
in Latin. An instauce of this, among thousands, is that fiunous line of dactyls ii^ 
Homer's Odyssey, expresuog the tumbling doym of the stone of Sisyphus : 

AuTic f irftr« «rl)iw)i xoXivhro xSck Aya(^c*''*-~Ody88. b. 11. • 

Another striking instance of the same accentuation appears in the two first 
verses of the Iliad : ' 

OvXo/utfvqy, h f4^l 'A^aioXq a\ft f dqjtfi. « 

. I know it may ]>e said that the written accents we see on Greek words are of 
no kind of autliority> and that we ought always to give accent to penultimate long 
quantity, as the Latms did. Not here to enter into a dispute about the authority' 
of the written accents, the nature of the acute, and its connexion with quantity, 
which has divided ^he learned of Europe for so many years — ^till we have a clearer 
ideaof the nature of the human voice, and the properties of speaking sounds, 
which a^me can clear Uie difficulty— for the sake of nnifonmty, perhaps it were 

K3 • V^«^^ 






54 



m 



IS 



IS 



*Iph-i-me-di'a 
I-phim' e-doa 
Iph-i-me-du'sa 
I-phin' o-e (8) 
I-phiu'o-us 
Tphis 

I-phit'i-ou(ll) 
Iph'i-tus 
Iph'thi-me . 
Ip-se'a (29) 

rra(l)(7) 
I-re'ne 

Ir-e-nae'us 



I-r^'aus 

VAs 

I'rl^s 

Is' a-das 

I-saj'a (7) 

I-sae'us 

Is'a-mus 

I-saii'der 

I-sa'pis 

Fsar, and Isf^a-m 

Fsar, and i-sdefus 

I-sar^chus (12) 

I-sau'ri-a 



Irsau'ri'^tis 
I-sau'rus 
Js.che'ni-a(l$) 
Is-cho-la'os 
Js-com'a-chus 
Is-chop'o-lu 
Is'ia (10) 
Is-de-gei^d€s 
Is-i-do' rus 
Isi-dore, (Ei^.) 
I'sis 
Is'ma-Fus, m4 



"<i^»^~ ^ » .. »i 



better to adopt the preyailing mode of pronbnQcing Gre^k proper names like 
the Latin, by makiog the quantity of the p^nitimate syllable the regulator •f 
the accent, tfiough contrary to the genins of Gl«ek accentuation, which made- 
the ultimate syUable its regidat^r; and if ^issyOable was long, the accent could 
never rise higher thim the peu»Hiimit6. Perhaps in language, as in laws, it is 
aot of so much importance that ^e rules of eillier diouKl be exactly ri^t, as that 
they should be Certainly atod easily known ;-hh> the object of attention in ihe 
preseat case Is not so much tvtMtt ought to he dene, as what actually is done ; 
and as pedantry will always be laore pardonable than ifHteraey, if we are it^ 
doabt about Ihe prevatence ^ entton, it will alwi^ be safer to lean to the side 
of Greek or Latia than of ow ewtt feagtuige. 

* iph^m&tia.-r^Tins aftd the fbregoing word have the accent on the same sylla - 
Me, but Ibr What reason citttliot be ettuly conceived. That Iphigenia, having tha 
4phthong u hi itspeimlt^slte syllable, should have th^ accent on that syllable, 
though aot the sotindest, is at least a plausible reason , but why should our prosqtr 
tets give the l^am'e attent to the i in Iphimedia 1 which coming from t^c and 
/Mi|l«, bas no such pretensions. If they say it has the accent in the Greek word, 
it may be answered, this is net esiteeinad a safficieDt »ea»0B for placing the ac- 
cent in Iphfgenia ; besides, it is giving up the sheet-anchor of modern presadhts, 
the quantity, as the regulator of accent. We know it was an axiom hi Greek 
prosody, that when the last syllable was long by nature, the accent could not 
jrise beyond the penultimate ; but we know too that this axiom is abandoned in 
Dtmogthenes, Aristotelety anda tiionsand other words. The only reason tliere- 
fore that remahw lR>r the ^eaukimate aeeeainafticn af this ^ard is, that t^ syl- 
lable is long bi some of the best peels. Be it^so. JLet those who have noove 
learning and leisuf^ than 1 4iave find it out la tiie intartra, as this amy peitefa 
be a long one, I must neour to n^ adviee^uiider'the^ast wai>d ; ^^oogfa AinsWorA 
has, in my opinion, -very propei^ left the ^etniltiaHrte tyliiijl)le of balii Ihesa 
words sb<Mt9 yet those who ^fiect Co be tliought learaed •vriil alwaye^ad^linir mo* 
c^unt in departing as far as possible fipai tha anntai^^!^ Ibair ownlasgttageia 

favour of Greek and Latin. 

f , . . ... •• 



IT 

Xs-me'ne (3) 
Is-me m-as 
is-men 1-des 
Is-me nus 
I-so</ ra-tes 
Is'sa (7) 
Is'se (8) 
Is' su^ 

Is'ter^apd Is'trus 
Ist'hmi-a* 
Ist' hmi-us 
l3Jt' hmus 
s-ti-ae p-tis 
Is'tri-a 
Is-trop' p-lis 
I'sus 

I-ta'Ha (7) 
Ifa-f^, (Eng.) 
li-taFiKca 
I-tal'i-cus 
It'a-lus ' 

It'e.a(20) 



I«tem^a-|<^3l 
Ith'a-ca ' 
I-thob' a-lu^ 
I-tho'me ' 
Ith-o-ma'i-^ 
l-tho^m^8 
Ilh-y-Dhal'lus 
-to' ni-a (7J 
I-to' nus 
It-u-rae'a 
I-tu' rum 
It'y-lus 
It-y-rae'i (3) 

rtys • 

Ju'b^ 
Ju-dae^ a 
Ju-gan' tes 
Ju-ga' ri-us 
Jii-guf'tha 
JuMi-a (7) 
Ju-li' a^des 
Jii-K-i'iius 



F 



6s 



Ju'li.i(4) 
Ju-li-o-n^a'gus 
JuJi-op'S^fis" 
JuMis • 

Ju'lf-us Csi^sar 
I-uMira • " 
Ju'ni-a (7) 
Ju' no 

Ju^no-na^Ji-a 
Ju-no- nerf" ' 
Ju-no'm-a 
Ju-no' nis"^ 
Ju' pi-ter 
J us- ti nus 
Ju-tui^ na 
Ju-ye-p^l|s 
Ju!^ ve-kalf (5!ng.) 
Ju-ven'tas *" ^ 
Ju-ver'nia, or 

Hi-ber' iii-a » 
Ix-ib'a-tae 
Ix-i' on 
Ix-i-on' irdes 



■ * " f 



"vr 



-rr 



JU!. ' aU.^ Jt ' JLJL 



hA 

La-ar'chus 
Lab' ^-ri^ 
Lab'.da 
Lab' da-cu^ 
Lab' da-Ion 
I^a' be-o 
La-be'ri-ijs 
La-bi'jci(4) 



14 

JLa-bi' cum 
La-bi-e'^ijus 
Lab-i-ne' jh^s 
La-feo' bj.-us 
La-i[?ob'ri-^,(3) 
La-bo' tas 
La-bra' de-u? 
Lab-y-rip'jthus 
La-cse'n|i 



L4 

Lac-e-dae' ipon 

tj^c-e-daB-ino'.ni-i 
ac-e-daem'ones 
Lac'e'de-mo' m-ans, 

(Eng.) ' ' . ■ 
La-cer' ta 
Lach' a-res 
La'che8(l)(12) 
*Lach' e-Bfs 



* iMchais, — Chtho and Lpn^usisy whose boundless sway, 
With il^opM both wen and gods obe^. v 

jCoK^^'s Seikd. Theog. v. S35. 

E4 



3i 



t^(f 



I4A 



Lac' }-das 
Jja-c i' de3 
La-cii/ i-a 
Larcin-i-en' set 
La-cin' i-uro 

jjac'moD 
JU'co (1) 
Irfucob' ri-ga 
La-co'ni-ay and 
La-con' i-ca; 
Lac'ra-tes 
]^c'ri-ne8 
Lac-tan' ti-u8 (l.O) 
Lac' ter 
Lac' y-des 
Jac' y-dus (24) 
La'<£is 

lA'de(8) 
La'des 
La' don 
La^'laps 
Lac' li-a 
Lae-li-a' nus 
Lse' li-us, C. 
LflBi'na and 

Le-ag^na 
Ij»' ne-us 
'Lae' pa Mag' na 
La-er'tes 
La-er^ti-us Di-og'c- 

nes ^ 
Lae-stiyg' o-nes 
Lae'ta 
Lae-to'ri-a 
Lae'tus 
Lae^vi (3) 
Lae-vi'nus . 
La-rga'ri-a 



LA 

La'gi-a(20) 

Lag' i-des 

La-cin'i-a 

La'gus 

La-gu' sa 

La-g/ra (6) 

La-i' a-des (3) 

tia'i-as 

La'is 

La'i-us 

Lal'a-ge 

La-las' sis 

Lam'a-chus 

La-mal'mon 

Lam-bra'ni (3) 

I«am'bnis 

La'mi-9 

La-mf a-cum bel' 

lum 
La'mi-ae 

La' mi-as £'li-us 
La-mi' rus 
Lam'pe-do 
Lam-pe'ti-a(lO) 
Lam'pe-to/ and 

Lam'pe-do 
Lam'pe-us, and 
Lam'pi-a 
Larn'oon, Lam' pos, 

or Lam' pus 
Lam-po ne'a . 
Lam-po'ni-a, and 
Lam-po' ni-um 
Lam-po'ni-us 
Lam-prid'i-us 

^'U-us 
Lam'pro-cles 
Lam'prus 



1 






LA 

Lamp'sa-cus, and 
Liamp'sa-chum 

Lamp-te'ria 

Lam pus 

La'mus 

Lam'y-rus 

La-nas^sa 

Lan'ce-a(lO) 

luan'ci-a ( it) 

Lan'di-a 

Lan'gi-a 

Lian-go-bai^di (3) 

La-nu'vi-um 

La-o-bo'tas, or 
Lab'o-tas 

LaHH/o-on 

La-od'a-mas 

La.o-da'mi-a (30) 

La.od'i-ce (8) 

La-od-i-ce'a 

La.od-i*ce'ne 

La-od'o-chus 

La-og'o-nus 

La-ogo-ras 

La-ogo-re (8) 

♦La-o-me-di'a (30) 

La-om'e-don ^ 

La-om-e-don' te-us 

La-om-e-don-ti' a- 
dae 

La-on'o-me (8) 

La-on-o-me'ne 

La-oth' o-e (8) 

La'o-us 

Lap'a-thus 

Laph'ri-a 

La-physi'ti-um 

La-pid'e-i 



* JLaomedia. E^agore^ Lamniiia joinj . 

And thou Polynome, the nmn'roiu line. 

CooKi'8 ^emtf, Th^. ▼. 399. 



\ 



LA 



LE 



LE 



57 



La-pid'e-us 
Lap'i-thas 
Lap-i-tWum 
Lap' i-tho 
Lap'i-thus 
La'ra,x)r La-ran' da 
La-ren'ti-a, and 

Lau-ren'tia (10) 
La' res 
Lar'^ga 
Lar^gus 
La-ri'des 
La-ri'na 
La-ri'num ' 
La-ris' sa 
La-ris'sus 
La' ri-us 
Lar'nos 
La-ro'ni-a 
Lar'ti-us Flo'rus 
Lar-to-tet^ a-ni 
Lar'vae 
La-rym'na 
La-rys'i-um (11) 
Las'si-a(lO) 
Las'sus, or 

La'sus 
Las' the-nes 
Las-thc^ ni-a^ or 

*La8-the-ni.^ 
Lat'a-gus 
Lat-e-ra'uus Plan' 

tus. 
La-te' ri-um 
Larti-a' lis 
La-^he-a! lis 
La-ti-a'ris 



f lud'she-af lis 
La-ti'ni(3)(4) 
La-tin' i-us 
La-ti' nus 
La'ti-um 
La! she-um 
La'ti-U9(10) 
Lat' mus 
La-to' i-a 
La-to' us 
La-to' is 
La-to' na 
La-top' o-lis 
La' tre-us 
Lau-do'ni-a 
La-ver' na 
Lau-fel'la 
Lav-i-a'na(7) 
La-vin'i-a 
La vin'i-um, or 

La-vi'num 
Laii'ra 
Lau^re-^a 
Lauren-ta'Ii-a 
Lau-reii' tes a' gri 
Lau-ren'ti-a(lO) 
Lau-ren-ti'ni (4) 
Lau'ren'tum 
Lau-ren' ti-us (10) 
Lau ri-on 
Lau' ron 

La' us Pom-pe' i-a 
Lau'sus 
Lau'ti-um (10) 
Le'a-des 
Le-ag'i(3) 
Le-ae^na 



Le-an'der 
Le-an' dre 
Le-an'dri-as 
Le ai^chtis(lf) 
Leb-a-d^ a 
Leb'e-dus, or 

Leb'e-dos 
Le-be'na 
Le-bin'thoSy and 

Le-^byn'tho8 
Le-chas'um 
Lee 'y-thus <24) 
Le'da 
Le-dae' a 
Le'dus 
Le' gi-o 
Le'i-tus (4) 
Le' laps 
Lei' e-ges 
Le'lex 
Le-man'nijs 
Lem' nos 
Le-mo' vi-i (3) 
Lem'u-res 
Le-mu'ri-a, and 

L&rmu-ra'li'jft 
Le-nae' us 
Len'tu-lus 
Le'o 

Le-o-ca' di-«. 
Le-o-co'ri-ott 
Le-oc'ra-te« 
Le-od'a-mas 
Le-od'o-cus 
Le-og'o-ras 
Le'oQ 
Le-o'na 



* Ldutkeida —All the prosodbts I bsve consnltecly except Aimworthy mctetit 
tiut word on the penQltimate syllable ; and thoogh English analogy woold prp« 
fer the accent on tiie antepennltimate, we must necessarily yield to such a de- 
cided snperiority of votes for the penultimate in. a word so litUe anglicised hy 
iise«— See ipMg^alff. 



fS 



fcE 



♦Le-on' a4us 
Le-on' i-da^ 
Ije-on'U-an^, ^i 

Le-on-ti'iji (4) 
Le-oii-to-cep|i'a-l(js 
Le-oft'tPB, or 

Le-pn-top'o-lis 
Lc-ou-tjch'i-cles 
Le'fls 

Le-o-tyoh' i-dea 

Lep' i-du3 
JjE-pbyr' i-uqj 
Le-pi' nu» 
l«-poa'ti-i(4) 
Le' pre-OB 
.Le'pri-um 
Jjepf ti-ne$ 
Lep'tis 
Le-ri-a 
Le-ri' na 

Le'ro 

lies' bpj 

lies' bus, or liss'faop 

tes'chesCia) 

Lea-tyfg' o-nes 

Le-ta' a\V9 

Le-thije'iis 

Le'die 

I^-ya'neX7) . 
Leu'cR 



(8) 
-co' jies 

-con' o-p 
■cop' e-tra 



LI 

Leu-c^'lep 
Leu-ca'ji-qnCIl) 
Leu-cas'K? 
Leu'ce 
Leu'ci (?) 
Leu-cjp' pe 
Leu-cip' pl-4e? 
Leu-cip' pus 
Leu' 
Leu 
Leu- 
Leu. 

Leu' co-phi', 
Lcii-cop'o-lis 
Lei/ cos 
Leu-co' Bi-a ( 1 1) 
I>eu-co syr'i-i(4) 
Leu-cot^'o:«, qr 

Leu-co' tl^p-a 
Leuc'tra 
Leuc'l^uifi 
Leu'cus . 
l>eu-cj-a' fii-as 
Le-vi' nus 
Leu-tyjch'i-4*s 
Lcx-o' vi-i (4) 
Li-ba' ni-iK 
Lib' a-Dus 
Lib-eiiTti'pa 
Li'ber 

,Ljb'e-ni(20) 
Lib-er-a' Iv-a 



w 

liber' tiW 

Li-be'tb^ 

Li-bet^' n-4^ 

lib'Mi, J4-])e'ciri 

lib-i-ti'p^ 

U'pf>il) 

Li'bcpi 

li-biur' na 
Li-bu/ni-a ' 

LJ-biu^nir^s 
li-bur'uuip 10?' r* 
Ld-bur'nHf 
Libs 
Lib'y-a 

Lib'y-cum ^J^'vp 
Lib'y-ciia, ^d 

iJ-4)yrfW 
Li'bys •■ 

Lie's tea 

Li'cha 

Li'ph^(J) 

Li'ch«« 

Li-cin' i-^ 

Li-cin' i-up 

li-ci'nus 

Li-^jW.ojriy 

Li',le(lp) 

Li-ga'n-i]jt 

Li'ger 

Ij'ger, oiip^fi-va 

Lig'o-raa 



" Le<matus.—ia the acceatuatjon of Uiis woid I haye iollowed Labbe and 

iemprkre tin: former ofwlKmi says— QuBnqoam c|p bac voce anipiiui cogilmn- 
Jmuqupicniditij virfa asiiiioiem— Till,tt\fii, tl«»ckarpediueiilia,ve conaider^-d 
this word. I (liink we (iiay be allowed to cftosider it ^ formod Irotn ti.e Latin 
Ut uud mtvs llon-boai. and iis .J^eflinsa/M >sJq(i«, noji(iatlo» of rcasfip cfn 
pe»vm^y it ^t'O'il'' ■"=' ksve .C"* "C'^^'- Til" ■» l;bff aqi^eBtoat^pn cpivil^y 
mea to it ia tlte play of Cjmbelioc, and i» in uiy opinion tbe bwl. 



u 

Jjg'u-rea 
JU-gu' ri-a 
Jjg-u-ri' nui 
Li'fus(18) 

jjWgiw 

Li-fc'a 

lil-y-ba^im 

li-mai^a 

Litn-iiae' \mt 
Ljm-Da-tid' i-t 
lim-iii' a-ce 
Lhn-ni-o' l« 
Liin-no' ni-a 

tia-ca' si-i (4) 

{io'dus 

lit/go-nae 

Jjio-ter' na pft' lu* 

Lin-ter'nura 

Ij'nus 

]^'o-des 

Lip' a-ra 

Lip' a-ris' 

liph' lum 

Xip-o-ck/nit 

Li-quen'ti^ 

lir-cae'iiB 

Li-rfo-pe 

Li'ris 

li-nin' i-as 

lia'son 

Ids'ilU 



LO 

lia'ta 
lit' a-brnm 
Lit'a-na 
Ld-tav' inciB 
Li-tei' oiUD 
lith-o-bo'b-k 
Li'thrus 
Li-tu' bifum 
Lit-y-er' «as 
Liv'i-a Dni-sil'h 
Liv-i-ne'i-ua 
li-vil' la 
Li'vi-u» 
iiVy, (Eog.) 

Lo' bon 
Lo'ce-us (if>) 
Lo'cha 
Ix)*chi-as 

Lo' cris 
Lo-cusi'ta 
Lo-cu'ti-us(lO) 
Lol' li-a Pau-k' na 
LoI<li-a' mil 
Lofli-us . 
Ixiii-iii'num 
Lon' dim, (Eng.) 
L.on-ga-re' nus 
Lon-|;)m' a-iiUB 
Lon-gi'iius 
Lau-^o-bar' di 
Lut»'tju-!a 
Lon-^n' ti-ca 
Lor'dKa) 
Lo;'y-nia 



Ul % 

Lo'tis, OE I^tQS 

Lo-topb' ^{i (3) 
Lo' ua, and A' q-ub 
Lu'a(7) 
Lu'ca 

Lu'ca-gi|B (ftO) 
Lu-ca' ni (3) 
Lu-ca'nha 
Lu-ca' ni-us 
Lu-ca' uua 
hu' can, (£ng,) 
Lu-ca' ri-a, er 

I^-ce'na 
Luc-ce' i-us 
Lu'cfl-res 
Lu-ce'ri-* 
Lii-ce'ti-ua(l<^ 
IjU-ci-a'nus 
U^ci-an, (Eng.) 
Lu'ci-fer 
1^-cil' i-ua 
Lu-cil' la 
Lu-ci'oa 
*Lii'ci-a 
Lu'ci-us(ie) 
Lu-cre'ti-a (1(^ 
Lu-cret'i-lis 
Lu-cre'ti-iii {\&i 
Lu-cri' num 
Lu-cri' nus 
Luc-ta'ti-4u{l^ 
I^i-cul' le-a 
XiU-ciU'iiu 

Lu'cUrplO(?9) 

Lu'ciu 



ut Joiiilly Ji.'a'iivt tbose wbo acctot thii word on UkC 
Latin vioi'il, oii^hl (o have the acrent on tlie aiitepe- 
;e, says he, we brcalt throagh rutea, nby should we 
tnastiain, Cecilia, heoca4ia, Natalia, &c. wilh the 
', Mkewiif ? — 'I'liu.oi^t to be a warning against sor 



60 



LY 



LY 



LY 



Lt^-da^Dum 

Lu' na (7) 

Lu^pa 

*Lu-per' cal 

Lu-per-ca'li-a 

Lu-per'ci (3) 

Ln-pei^cus 

Lu'pi-as, orLu' 

X«u^pii9 
. jLu-si-ta'm-a 

La-£K>'nes 

Lais' tri-cus 

liu-ta' ti-us 

Lu-te'ri-us 

Lu-te'ti-a(lO) 

Luto'ri-u8 

Ly-ae'us 
. Ly'bas 

Lyb'y-a, or 
Ly-bis'sa 

Lye' a-bas . 

Lyc-a-be' tus 

Ly-cae' a 

l>y-€aB'um 

Ly-cae' us 

Ly-cam' bes 

Ly-ca' on 

Lyo-a-o'ni-a 

L/cas 

Ly-cas' te , 

Ly-cas'tum 

Ly-cas'tus 



pi-a 



L/cc (8) 

L/ces 

Ii»y-ce'Uin 

Lych-ni'des 

Lyc'i-a(lO) 

Lye' i-das 

Ly-cim' na 

Ly-cim'ni-a 

Ly-cis' eus 

Lyc'i-us(lO) 

Lye-o-me'des (20) 

L/ con ' 

Ly-co'ne (8) 

Lyc'o-phron 

Ly-cop' o-lis 

Ly-eo' pus 

Ly-eo'ri-as 

Ly-co'ris 

Ly-coi^ mas 

Ly-cor' tas 

Lye-o-8u' ra 

Lye' tus 

Ly-cu/ gi-des 

Ly-eur'gus 

L/eus 

L/de (8) 

Lyd'i-a 

Lyd'i-as 

Lyd'i-us 

L/dus 

Lyg' da-mis, or 

Ljg'da-mus 



Lyg'w(4) 
Ly'gus 
L^-mi' re 
Ly' max 
Lyn-ci' des 
Lyn-ces'tae 
Lyn-ces'tes 
Lyn-ces'ti-u«* 
Lyn-ce'us 

Lyn'ciiSy Lyn-ca^'us, 
<M'Lynx 

Lyr'ew 

Lyr-cae'u* 

Lyr-ee'a 

Lyr'cus 

Lyr-nes'sus 

Ly-san'der 

Ly-san'dra 

Ly-sa'ni-as 

Ly'«(8) 

Ly-si'a-des 

Lys-i-a*nas'sa 

Ly-si' a-nax 

Ly8'i-as(ll) 

Lys'i-eles 

Ly-sid' i-ee 

Ly-sim' a-ehe 

Lys-i-ma' ehi-a 

Ly-sim' a-chus 

Lys-i-maeh' i-dcs 

Lys-i-me'li-a 



* Luperail. — ^This word is 8# little interwoyen with our haigaaf^e, that it 
flvght to have its true Latin accent on the penultimate syllable. But wherever 
the antepenultimate accent is adopted in verse^ as in Shakspeare*s Julius Cassar^ 
where Antony says, ^ 

Yon all did see that on the La' percai 

I thrice presented him a kuigly crown — rr 

we oaght to preserve it.-^Mr. Barry, the actor^ .who was informed by som* 
scholar of the Latin prommciation of this word, adopted it in this place, and 
pronounced it Luper^ealy which grated every ear that heard hinu 



Lyjii/o-eCS) 


L/aia 


Lj-ao 


Lj-8ip^pe 


Ly-sis'tra-bu 


Ly-O^a 


Ly-np'pw 


Lji-8ilh'<Hia 


Ly-za'ni-aa 


M£ 


MA 


MA 


Mx-ci 


MKm-ac-te' ri-a 


Ma-joi'ca 


M.'a>r 


Mm'a-dea 


Ma' la For-lu'na 


Ma-«i' re-US 


MWa-la 


Mal'a-cha 


M.-«a'ri-. 


Mst/a-lua 


Ma-l^a 


Maf'ii-ri» 


M^m-u. 


Mai' ho, or 


M.-ced'mu 


M»'non 


Ma'tho 


Mic-e-do 


MaM/ni-a 


Ma'li-a 


Mac-e-do'ni-i 


Mo-on'i-da! 


Ma'li-i(4) 


Mac-e-dotfi-cusCao) 


M.-on'1-des 


Ma'li. 


M.-cel'l. 


Moe'o-iiis 


Mal'la-a, or MaTlU 


Ma'cer iE-myl' i^iu 


Mie-o'tK 


Mal'U-u. 


Ma^«'i> 


Mai^'da Pa'lm 


Mal'lo. 


Ma-clWi-d.. 


Me'si-aSyKvaCU) 


Mal-thi'oaa 


Ma-dn'on 


M»'vi-a 


Mal-va-na 


Ma'cra 


Tllic'vi-M 


Ma-ma'us 


Mac-ri-a-niu 


Ma'ga. 


Ma-meK eus 


Ma-cH'sui,M 


Ma-gar la 


Ma-mer'thea 


Ma'cro 


Mag-a-bE 
M/gi 


Mam-er-tKiia 


Ma-c>o'bi-i (4) 


Mani-er-ti^iii(4)(3) 


Ma-cn>'bi-us 


Ma'gi-ii. 


Ma-mil'i.. 


Mac'ro-chir 


Malaga Gra/cl-a 


Ma-min-i (4) 


Ma-cro'iies 


Mag-nei/ti-us (10) 


Ma-miKi-u! 


Mac-to'fi-um 


Mag-na. 


Maoi-mK' a 


Mac-u-b'nii. 


Mag-ne'ai-a (11) 
MaV 


Ma-mu'n-us , 


Ma-de'te. 


Ma-mui'ra 


MacTj-ea 


Ma'gon 


Ma-ma'ta-bat 


Ma-dea'tea 


Mag-o»-li'a-cum 
M7g»a 


Man-ci' nua 


MitWder 


Man-da' ne (8) 


M«-al/dri-a 


Ma-hei'b.l 


M»-da'na. 


MaM^naa 


Ma'U 


Man-de'h 


M>/iHlf) 


Ma-jaCtas 


Mai»Uiii-lll 


JWIwu 







HA 



Mar 
Mai 
Mai 



i-droc'li-das 
i' dron 

ii-dii'*)i-'iX«^ 
Man-du-bra'ti-us 
Sfa,'ne3 
Ha-ne'tbo 
Ma'ni-a 
Ma-nil' i-a 
Ma-DilH4« 
Mao' i-mi (4) 
Man' li-a 
Man'li-us IVtr-^ua' 

tus 
Mai/nus 
Man-sue' tus 
Man-ti-De' a 
Man-ti-oe' us 
Man'ti-us (tQ) 
Man'lo 
Man'tu-a 
Mar-a-can*^ 
Mar'a-tha 
Mai' a-thon 
Mar'a-thos 
Mar-eel' la 
Mar-cel-)i' bus An- 

mi-a' nus 
Mar-ceTlus 
Mai'ci-adO) 
Mifr-ici-a' na 
Mar-she-a' na 
Mar-ci-a-nop' o-lis 
Mar-ci-a'mia (10) 
MaK ci-us Sa-bi' nuc 
Mar-co-man'oi 
Mar'cus 
Mar'ffirS) 
Mar'dUa 



MA 

Mnr-do' iii-us 
Mar' das 
Mar-e-o'rie 
Mar-gill' i-a, and 

Mar-gi-a'ni-a 
Mar-^4e8 
•Ma-ri'a or Ma'ri-a 
Ma-ri'a-ba 
Ma-ri-am' lie 
Ma-ri-a'nse Fos'sae 
M a-ri-aii-dj' uum 
Ma-ri-a'aus 
Ma-ri' ca 
Ma-ri' ci <3) 
Mar* i-cus 
Ma-ri' na 
Ma-ri' nus 
Ma' iy-o» 
Ma'ris 
Ma-ris'sa 
Mai'i-sus 
Ma-ri'ta 
Ma'ri-»s 
Mar* ma-^us 
Mar-ma-ren's^ 
Mar-mar' i-ca 
Mar-mar' i-<lK 
Mar-ina'ri-ou 
Ma'ro(l) 
Mar-o-bud'u-a'(3> 
Ma'Ton j 

Mar-o-ne'« 
Mar-pe' ai-a (.W) 
Mar-f^ea'aa 
Mar-pe' BUS 
Matures * 

Mar-ru' vi-ufli, or 

Mar-ru' bi-um 



MA 

Mars 
Mar'sa-Ia 
Mar-sic'Bb 
Mar'se (8) 
Mai's! (3) 

Mar-sy' a-ba. 
Mar'tha 
Mai'ti-« (10) 
Ma/ske-a 
Mar-ti-a' lig 
Mar' ti-al (Eng.) 
Mar-ti-a' nus 
Mar-ti'iia 
Mar-tin-i-a' mis 
Mar'ti-ua (iO) ' 
Ma-rul'lus 
Mus-ae-syri-i (d^ 
Mas-i-nie' an 
Mas' sa 
Mas' sa-ga 
Mas-sag' c-ix 
Mas-sa'ua(7> 
Maa-sa'iii (ft) 
Mae'si-cus 
Mas-sil'ina{7^ 

Ma-su' ri-u3 

Ma'tho 

Ma-ti-e'm 

Ma-ti'nns 
. Ma-^co 
i M»-tn^.ii-it 

Ma-tro'm 

Mat-ro-Da'U-ra 

Mat-ti'a-<A(3) 

Ma-tu'ta 

Ma'vors 



* Mma.— nih-weMji^'g Lnbbe, derived rraln tbe HebreWtAMtfacvnaat 
«atlie second >}llllble>;•bnt«)M«aI;«tM^nft^4te feauiuBe i^ fKmmu,.Ml»» 
4ie sccestieil 4lie tint. 



Mail' ri (3) 
Mauiri^bi-s 
Mau'ruS 

Mau-ru'SWS[i)<)l) 
Mau-3o'l*9 
Max-en' ti-t:i'3 (10) 
Max-im-i-A'niia 
Max-i-itiil-i-H* rta 
Max-i-im'ntDs 
Mai' i-mm. '(Ea^,) 
Max' i-m^ 
Maz'a-ca 
Ma-za' ces 
Ma-zK'us 
Ma-za' f^ 
Ma/e-ra& 
Ma-zTH^, mi 
Ma-z/^B 
Me-cha' nie-As 
Me-coe' naa, or 

Me-cfe'hto 
Me-cis'tfeJas 
Mec'ri-ilA 
Me^le'Ji 

Me-d^:^*ftrte^(8> 
Me'di-*(7) 
Me'di-as 
Mdd'i-ciis 
Me-di-o-m&-tri'<r^ 
Me-di-o-lria-tri'^d 
Me-di-ox"u-6ii 
Med-i-tri''fiii 
Me-do'a^Ua, dr 

Me-du'a-cib 



Ml: 

Med-oiBiA*y-Hl 

Me-dob' ri-gfe 

Me' don 

Me-d<A'ti^j;iD) 

Med-u-a'M 

Med-ul-li'Di 

Me'dus 

Me-du'lft 

Me-gab' i-zi 

Meg-a-by' iiis 

Mp^'a-cft* 

Me-gac' li-deS 

Me-ga/ra 

Mfe^gi' h-Ua 

Meg-a-le'si-a<Ul 

Me-ga' li-a 

Meg-a-lop' o-lis 

Meg-a-me'de'(8> 

Meg-a-ni'ta 

M eg-a-pen' theb 

•M5g'4-Va 

tMeg-a-lre' *is 

Meg'*-^ 

Mc-gaK SUS 

Me-gas' the-un 

Me'ges 

Me-giFlii 

Me-gis'ta 

Me' la Pom-po'ni-i 

Me-gis' ti-a 

Me-is' Qffi 

Me-lam' pns 

Mel-anch-he'Tii 

Me-laii' chrKs 

Mei' a-ne 



Me e» 

Me-Ia'WfeiTis 

Me-lan'i-da ' 

Me-la'ni-on 

Mcl-a-iiip'pft 

MeLa-nip' pl-daa 

MeLa-nij)' paa 

Mel-a-no' pis 

Mel-a-noB' y-ri 

Me-lan'thi-i(4) 

Me.lan'thi^iS 

Me-laii'tllo 

Me-WAiA 

Me' las 

Mel-e-i'^ 

Mel-e-9g'ri-a*i 

Me'leistt'*r 

Me'les 

Mel',ri-W! 

Mel-e-sig'fe%fti, «f ' 

Mel-e-sig'e'*a 
Me'*i-i 
Mel-i-boe' us 
Mel-i-cer'tfc 
Mel-ign'nis - 
McJi'ra 
MeJi'sa (7^ 
Me-lis'sit 
Me-lts' tah 
Mel'i-ta 
Mel'i-te 
Mel-i-te'Me 
Meri-tUS, Jk<W** 

of Socrates 
Me^li-os 
Mel-ix-an' artft 



' if^^OM.— tbWe-lii'tfaimordfbllOTreilUbbe, Ainiworth, Gouldnm, anil 

. Hnlyoke, b; adopting the antepei^iiltiitiHtc accent in opposhjon to -Jxin]lTien, 

wbo Mccot* the penDltimate sjllablr. 

,'t W^io-fM.^labbepronotnices thia woril in foiir SyIIab)«s,fifienaiMniirWA- 

- stantivc; but Ainsworlli niaifu it tis a tii<;ltab1c, wlferitpntper'imiiin; Milt 

■(lyOplluoD incoirecttj'. — Steliomamu. 



«4 



^me 



ME 



ME 



♦Me-lob'o-sis 
Me' Ion 
M^los 
MeFpi-a 
Mel-pom'e-ne (8) 
Me-mac'e-ni 
Mem'mi-a 
Mem'mi-u» 
Mem'naa 
Mem'(diiff 
Mem-phi' lis 
Me'iia, ojr(.Me'ne9 
Me-nal'cas 
Me-nal'ci-das 
Men-a-Iip'pe 
Men-arlip'pus 
Me-nan'der 
Me-na' pi-i (4) 
l^ei/a-pis 
Me' nag 

Men-che'res (12) 
;Men'des 
Me-Dec/les 
Men-e-cli'des 
Me-nec' ra-tes 
Men-e-de' mus 
Me-neg' e-tas 
> Men-e-la' i-a 
Men-e-Ia'us 
Me-ne' ni-u« 

A-grip' pa 
Men' e-phroQ 
Me^neg 
Memoes' the-us, or 

Maes' the-us [13) 
Me-nes'teusy or 
Men-es>the'i Por' 

tus 



Me-nes' dif-us 

Men' e-tas 

Me-nip' pa 

Me-nip'pides 

Me-mp' pus 

Me'ni-us 

Men'nis 

Me-nod'o-tus 

Me-noe'ce-us (10) 

Me-nce'tes 

Me-noe'ti-us(lO) 

Me'non* ' 

Me-noph' i-lus 

Men'ta, or Min'the 

Men' tes 

Men-tis'sa 

Men' to 

Men' tor 

Me-nyl'lu8 

Me'ra 

Me'ra, or Moe'ra 

Mer-cu'ri-us 

Me/cu-ry (Eug.) 

Me-ri'o-nes 

Mer'me-rus 

Merm' na-dae 

Mer' o-e (8) 

Mer' o-pe (8) 

Me' rops 

Me'ros 

Mer' u-Ia 

Me-sab' a-tes 

Me-sa' bi-us 

Me-sa'pi-a 

Me-sau' bi-us 

Me-sem' bri-a 

Me-se' ne 

Mes-o-me'des 



Mes-o-po-ta'mi-a 
Mes-sa' la 
Me8-sar-li'na(3) 
Mes-sa-li'nus 

Mes*sa'na(7) 
Mes-sa'pi-a 
Mes' sa-tis 
Mes'se (3) 
'Mes-se'is (5) 
Mes-se'ne,or 
Mes-se'na 
Mes-se'iii-a 
Mes'tor 
Me-su'la 
M^t'a-bus 
Met-a-git'ni-a 
Met-a-ni'ra 
MeW-pon' turn 
Met-a-pon'tus 
Me*tau'rus 
Me-tel'la 
Me-tel'li (3) 
Me-thar'ma 
Me-thi'on (29] 
Me-tho'di-us 
Me-tho'he (8) 
Mc-thyd' ri-um 
Me-thym' na 
Me-ti-a-du' sa (21) 
Me-tir i-a 
Me-tir 1-1(4) 
Me-til'i-us 
Me-ti'o-chus 
Me'ti-on(ll) 
Me'tis 
Me-ti^cus 
Me'ti-us(lO) 
Me-toe'ci-a(lO) 



* MelobotU, — ^In this word I have givei^the preference to the antepenultiiiiatc 
accent, with Labbe, GouldmaBy and Holyoke ; tbon^ the penuUiiuate; which 
Xiim^ere haf adopted, it more ajp'eeable to the ear. 



MI 

Me' ton 

Met'o-pe (8) 

Me'tra 

Me-tro' bUus 

Met'ro-cles 

Met-ro-do' rus 

Me-tro pli' a-nes 

Me-tro p'o-lis 

Met'ti-iis.,10) 

Me-va' ni-a 

Me' vi-us 

Me-zen'ti-us (10) 

Mi-ce'a 

Mi-cip' sa 

Mic'y-thus (24) 

Mi' das 

Mi-de'a of Argos 

Mid' e-a of Boeotia 

Mi-la' ni-OD 

Mi-le'si-i(4)(ll) 

Mi-le'si-iis(lO) 

Mi-le'ti-a (10) 

Mi-Ie'ti-um(lO) 

Mi-le'tus 

Mil'i-as 

Mil'i-chu3(l2) 

Mi-li' nus 

Mil-i-o'ni-a 

Mi'lo 

Mi-lo'Di-us 

Mil-ti'a-des 

Mil' to 
. Mil' vi-us 

Mil' y-as 

Mi-mal' lo-nea 

Mi' mas 

Mim-ner' mus 
'Min'ci-U9(10) 

Min'da-ras 

Mi-oe'i-des 

Mi-ner' va 

Min-er-va'lt-« 

Mii/i-o 



MN 

Min-ns'i (3) 
Mi-no' a 
Mi-no' is 
Mi'nos 
Min-o-tau'rus 
Min'the 
Min-tui'nffi 
Mi-nu'ti-a(lO) 
Mi-nu' ti-us (10) 
Min'y-K (6) 
Min'y-as 
Min'y-cQs 
Mi-ny' i-a (6) 
Min'j-tus 
Mir' a-ces 
Mi-se'num 
Mi-se'nus 
Mi-sith'e-us 
Mi'thras 
Mith-ra-da' tes 
Mi-thre'nes 
Mith-ri-da'tes 
Mitli-ri-da'lis 
Milh-ro-bar-za' nt 
Mit-y-le' lie, and 
Mit-y-le'na 
Mi'lys 
Miz-£e'i 

Mna-sal'ces (13) 
Nasal' ces 
Mna'si-as (II) 
Mnas' i>clea 
Mria-sip' pi-das 
Miia-sip' pus 
Mua-sitii' e-us 
Miia'son(13) 
Mna-syr'i-uin 
Mne'mon 
Miio-mos'y-ni 
Miie-sar'chus 
Miie-sid'a-miis 
Mnes-i-la' lis 
Mne-flim' a-che 
F 



(3) 



MO ( 

M De-aim' a-chns 

Mnes' ter 

Mnes'lhe-us(13) 

Mnes'ti>a 

Mnes'tra 

Mne'vis 

Mo-a-phei'nea 

Mo' di-a 

Moe'ci-a(5)(10) 

Mce'nus 

McE-rag' e-te« 

Mce'ris 

Mce'di 

Moe'on 

M(E-on'i-des 

Moe'ra 

Mce'si-a 

Mo-gy'ni 

Mo-le'i-a 

Mo-li'o-ne 

Mo'lo 

Mo-Ice' is 

Mo-Ioi'cliiis (12) 

Mo-Wsi(3) 

Mo-Ids' si-a, or 

Mo-los'sis 

Mo-las' sus 

Mol-pa' di-a 

Mol' pus 

Mo' his 

Mo-lyc'ri-on 

Mo -mem' phis 

Mo'mus 

Mo'na 

Mo-ne'ses 

Mo-ne* sus 

Mo-ne' ta 

Mon' i-ma 

Mod' i-mus 

M(ai'o-dns 

Mo-noe'cus 

Mo-no' le-us 

Mo-iKiph'j-Iw 



05 MU 



MU 



MY 



Mon-ta'nuf 
Mo-noph^ a-ge 

Mon'y-mus 

Mo' phis 

Mop'si-um (10) 

Mop-so' pi-a 

Mop'sus 

Moc-gan' ti-um ( 1 0) 

Mor'i-ni 

Mor-Utas'gus 

Mo'ri-us 

Mor'phe-us 

Mors 

• 

Mo' rys 
Mo'sa 

Mds'chi(3)(12) 
Mos' chi-on 
Mos' chus 
Mo-sel'la 
Mo' ses 
Mo-sych'liis 
Mos-y-naB' ci (3) 
Mo-tho' ne 
Mo-ty'a 
Mu-ci-a'nus 
Mi¥'ciu8(10) 
Mu' crae 



Mul'^i-ber 

*Mu-lu' cha 

Mill' vi-us Pons 

Mum' mi-us 

Mu-na'ti-us(lO) 

Mun'da 

Mu-ni'tus 

Mu-nych' i-ae (4) 

Mu-rae' na 

Mur'cus 

Mu-re' tus 

Mur-gan'ti-a (10) 

Mur-rhe' nus 

Mur'ti-a(lO) 

Mus 

Mu' sa An-to' ni-us 

Mu'sae 

Mu-sae' us 

Mu-so' ni-us Ru'fus 

Mus-te' la 

Mu-thul' lus 

Mu'ti-a(IO) 

Mu-til'i-a 

f Mu' ti-na 

Mu-ti'nes 

Mu-ti' nus 

Mu'ti-us(lO) 

Mu-tu'nus, or 



Mu-tus'cDB 
My-ag'rus, or 

My' o-des 
fMyc' a-le 
Myc-a-les' sua 
My-ce'nae 
Myc-e-ri' nus 
Myc-i-ber'na 
Myc' i-thus 
M/con 
fMyc' o-ne 
M/don 
My-e' nus 
My-ec' pho-ris 
Myg'jdon 
Myg-do'ni-a 
M^ do-nus 
My-las'sa 
M/ les 

My'Ie, or M/las 
My-lifta 
Myn' dus 
My'nes 
Myn' i-ae (4) 
My-o'ni-a 
Myr-ci'nus 
My-ri' cus 
JMy-ri'nus . 



* MutucluL — ^This word is accented on the anjtepenultimate syllable b]^ Labbe, 
Lenipriere, and Absworth ; and on the penultimate by Gooldman and Holyoke. 
I^bbe, indeed, says ut volueiis ; and I shall certainly avail ni3rself of this per*. 
mission to place the accent on the penultimate; for when this syllable ends 
with u, the English have a strong propensity to place the accent on it, even ii^ 
opposition to etymology, as in the word ArbvtuMt 

t Mycale and Mytone. — ^An English ear seems to have a strong predilection for 
the penultimate accent on these words -, but all our prosodists accent them on tht 
antepennltimate. The same may be observtrd^of Mutina, — See note en Onfw* 

X ikfyrinM.— lAbbe is the only prosodist I have met with who accents this 
word OB the antepenulthnate ssrllable ; and as this accentuation is so contrary to 
analogy, I have followed Lempriere, Ainswortfa, Gouldman, and Holyoke, with 
the aiccentim the pennltimate. — See the word in the Termirufiwnal VoctibuUtry, 



. MY 

Myri'na 

Myr'i-ce 

Myr-mec/i-des 

Myr-mid^o-nes 

My-ro'nu8 

My-roHu-a'nus 

My-r^n'i-des 

Myr'rha 

Myr' si Jus 

Myi^si-nuS; a City 



MY 

My-stal'i*des 
Myr'sus 
Myi'tc-a Venus 
Myr-te'a, a Ci^ 
Myr' ti-lus 
Myr-to' um Ma' re 
Myr-tun' ti-um (10) 
Myr-tu'sa 
My-scel'lu8 
Myr'tis 



MY 

Myr'ta-le, 

Myr-to'us 

Mys^tes 

Mys'i.a(ll) 

My-80-ma-ced'o- 

nes 
M/son 
Myth' e-cu8 
Myt-i-le'ne 
M/us 







■ds 



aata 



NA 

jVab-ar-za'nes 

Nab^a-thse's^ 

Na'bis 

Ifa-dag'a-ra 

Nae'ni-a 

Nae'vi-us 

Naev' o-lus 

Na-har'va-li (3) 

Nai' a-Kfes 

Na'is 

!Na-pa^as 

Napl/i-lus 

Nar 

Nar'bo 

Nar-bo-qen' sis 

N^MT-cai'ui 

Nar-cis'sus 

Nar^ga-^ra 

Na-ris^ ci (3) 

Nar'ni-a, or Nar'na 

Nar-the'cis 

Na-ryc'i-a(lO) 

Nai^ ses , 

Nas-a-m</nes 

Nas'ci-o, or Na'tio 



NA . 

Nas' i-ca 
Na-sid-i-e'nus 
Na-sid'i-us 
Na' so 

Nas' susy or Na' sus 
Nas'u-a(lO) 
Na-ta'lis 
Nat'ta 
Na-ta'H-a 
Na'va 
Nau'co-Ius 
Nau' cles 
Nau' cra-tes 
Nau'cra-tis 
Na' vi-us Ac' ti-us 
Nau'lo-chus 
Nau-pac/tus, or 
Nau-pac'tum 
Nau'pii-a 
Nau'pli-us 
Nau'ra 
Nau-sic'a-ae 
Nau«si-cles 
Nau-sim'e-nes 
I Nau-sith'o-c 



NE 

Nau-sith'o-us 

Nau'tes(l7) 
Nax'os 
Ne-ae'ra 
Ne-ae'thus 
Ne-al'ces 
Ne-al'i-ces 
Ne-ai)' thes 
Ne-ap'o-^lis • 
Ne-archus 
Ne-bro'des , 
Ne^hropV o-ik)s 
Ne'chos 
Nec-ta-ne'bus, and 

Nec-*taii'a-bis 
Ne-cyi^i^ (10) 
Ne'is 
Ne'le-us 
Ne'lo 
Ne-mae' a 
Ne-me'a 

Ne-me-si-a' fius (21) 
Nem' e-sis 
Ne-me'si-us (10) 
1 Nem-o-ra'U-a 



68 NE 

Nem'e-tes 
Ne-m^ua 
*Ne^-bu'le 

Ne-o-cses-a-re' a 

Ne-och' a-bis 

Ne'o-cles 

Ue-og'e-ne'* 

Ne-om' o-iiS 

Ne'on 

Ne-on-ti'cho»(18) 

Ne-op-tol'e-niu9 

fNe'o-ris 



Ne' 



f^. 



Ne-pha' li-a 
Neph'ele 
Neph-er-i' tea 
Ne' phuB 
Ne' pi-a 
Ne'pos 

Ne-po-ti-a'nu» (14) 
Nep' lhj9 
Nep-tu' ni-a 
Nep-tu' ni-um 
Nep-tu' ni ■us 
Nep*tu' nus 
?iep'tune, (Eng.) 
Ne-re' i-des 
W re-ids, (Eng.) 



m 

Ne re'i-us 

±Ne' re-US 

Ne-ri' ne 

Nei'i phiw 

Nei'i-tos 

Ne' ri-iis 

Ne'ro 

Ne-ro' ni-a 

Ner-to-brig' i-a 

Ner' va Coc-ce' i-us 

Nei'vi-i (3) 

Nei'u-Ium 

Ne-saj'a 

Ne-sim' a-chus (12) 

Ne-si-o' pe 

Ne-she-ffpe 

Ne-so' pe 

Ne'sis 

Nes' to-cles 

Nes'tor 

Nes-to'ri-us 

Nes' tu3, or Nes'sus 

Ne'tum 

Ne' u-ri 

Ni-cffi' a 

Ni-cag' o-ras 

Ni-can' der 



NI 

Ni ca' noi 

Ni-car' chas 

Nic-BT'thi'des 

Ni-ca' tor 

Ni'ce(8) 

Nic-e-pho'ri-um 

Nic-e-plio'ri-ui 

Ni-ceiih'orus 

Nic-er-ii'tus 

Ni-ce'taa" 

Nic-e-te'ri-a 

NSC' i-a (10) 

Nic'i-a3(10) 

Ni-cip' pe 

Ni-cip' pus 

Ni'co 

Ni-coch'a-re» 

Nic'o-cles 



Ni-toc'r 






Ni-co' cre-on 
Nic-o-de' mus 
Nic-o-do' rus 
Ni-cod' ro-mus 
Nic-o-lii'»a 
Ni^com' a-cha 
Ni-com' a-chus 
Nic-o-me' des 
Nic-o-me* di-a 



• Nfoftuff — Ubbe, Aiiwworth, Gouldman, LilHetoii, and Holyoke, give thi» 

nul.in.nt/»crect giv.n it by l*«,pricre ict ody fro., tb. n.p.b„ of »»tl.ori- 
lien in it* lavour, but from itslieing more agtfpable lo anaJosj'. 

t N««rl» —The ■nthoritiw are nparly equally taUnced betweeo the penallj. 
mite ^nH ^ttp-^nnltimate accent »>.d therefore I may say, a. Labbe wmetiaw. 

et ,,/rr-JiifrM; biitlamincUuedratlwrtotheantepcQultiniatEaccentMBftOW 
^e^lc to -ai.abg>-,tbouBhlthiiiVlliepcnultui«tPm<.i>o agreeable to the, etr. 



tf> 



M —Old yerm to the sen ww Imn'of sarOi- 
Htmi *bo claim 8 the precedence in birth 
To ftrir deacciidaniB him old god thrj csU, 
BCCSOM (hicere nud aflable to all, 

Cooke's lleiitd, Tluog. v. Sir. 



Nf con 


Ni-to'cru 


No'vi-m IWcu. 


Ni-co'm-a 


Ntfri-» 


Noa'nus 


Nic-o-phron 
Ni-co/olli, 


No' us 


Nox 


Noi/mon . 


Nu-ce-ri-a 


Ni-C03'tni-ta. 


Noc-n-lu'ca 


Nu-ith'o^ie. 


Ni-<;os'tra-tu3 


No'h 


Nu'ma Pom-pil'i-uB 


Nic-o-te' le-a 


Nom-eo-ta'nus 


No-ma' Da 


Ni-cot-e-les 


Nom'a-des 


Nu-mao'tl-a 


Ni'ger 


No' ma. 


Nu-man-ti'Da 


Ni-gid-i-u.Fig'u- 


No-men' turn 


Nu-ma'nufl Rem'u- 


iJ. 


No-mi-iCS) 


lus 


Ni-gri'ta 


No'mi-us 


Nu'me-nes 


Ni'le-ui 


•No-na'cm 


Nu-me'iii-a, or 


Ni'Iiu 


No'ni-u. 


Ne-o-me'm-a 


Nin'ni-u. 


Non'ni-ua 


Nu-me' n.-u8 


Nin'i-a, 


No'pia, or 


Nu-me-ri-a'nu8 


Ni-rau 


Cno' pi-a 


No-me'ri-us 


Nirfv-iu 


No'ra 


tNu-rai'cu. 


NiVbe 


No'rai 


Nn' mi-da 


Ni-plBj-iu 


Noi'ba 


Nu-mid'i-a 


Ni-ph,'le< 


Nor-ba'nus, C. 


Nu-mid'i-us 


Ni'phe 


Nor-i-cum 


Nil' mi-tor 


Nir-e-iu 


Nor-thip'pus 


Nu-rai-to'ri-u, . 


Ni's. 


Noi^ti-a(lO) 


Nu-mo'ni-ua 


Ni-.a:'a 


No' thus 


Nun-co're-u. 


Ni-M-U 


No' ..us 


tNm.'di-.a ^ 


Ni-sa/e 


No'ti-um(lO) 


Nun'di-oie 


Nij'i-bi. 


No'tu. 


Nu.'ra 


Ni'iui 


No-va' tus 


Nor'aci-a 


Ni-.)'™" 


No-vi-o-du'num 


Nu.^8i-a(i9) 


Ni-te'tis 


No-vi-om'a-gum 


No'tri-a 



* Nbnacru. — LabLe, AioBworth, Gauldnutn, and Holynke, give this word 
t^ aalrpeu ultimate accent; bat Lempricre, litQetOD, and tbe CraduBU, 
place lUe accent, niOre agreeably to analog, on tlie pvnuUiiiute. 

t Numinu. OurAcel ApaUaifuds 

H'herc 'I'liHtan 'rvbei- rolls with rapid forco, 

Audwbete AumicMOpeihuboly -source, DnvoEN. 

t A'aadiM. — Lempriere phcei the accent on Ibe peoaltioate lyllable of 
tliu word; bot Ltibbe, Oouldm^ and Holynke, on At uitapennltimatt. 
AWworth miTki it in the Mue imnMT inoog tht, a\ 

ba any doubt ^ itf propriety. 



70 NT 

Nyc-te'is 

Nye' te-u8 
Jfyc-tim'e-ne 
Nye' ti^mus 
Nym-bae' um 
Nym' pha& 
Nyr^phs, (Eng.) 



Nym-phae'iiin. 
Nym-phae'iis 
Nym-phid'i-u^ 
Nym<phis \ 
Nyin-phordo'rus 
Nym-pho-lep' tes 
Nym' pbon 
Nyp' si-us 



Ny'sa, or Nys^sa 

Ny-s^UB 

N/sas 

Nyrse'iruj 

Ny-rsi'a-des 

Ny-sig'e-na 

Ny-si'ros 

Nys^«l 



oc 

O' A-aus 

0-01^8615 

Ca-si* 
Q-ax' es 
0*ax'u8 
Ob-ul-tro'ni-u$ 
P-ca' le-a, or 

O-ca' li-^ 
*0-ce' a-na 
O-ce-an' i-des, and 

O-ce-an-it? i-desf 
O-ce' a-nus 
O-ce' i-a 
O-cel' lus 
O-ce'lum 
O' cha 

Oche'si-U8(ll) 
(yehus (12) 



on 

Oe'nus 

O-cric'u-liim 

O-erid'i-on 

O-cris' i-a 

Oc-ta-cil'liTUs 

Oe-ta' vi-a 

Oe-ta-vi-a'nHs 

Oc-ta' vi-us 

Oc-tol'o-phum 

O-cy' a-lus 

O-cyp'e-te (8) 

p-eyr^o-e 

Od-e-na' tus 

O-des'sus 

0-di'nu9 

P-di'tes 

pd-o-a'cer 

Pd-o-man' ti (3) 



Odf o-nes 
Pd' ry-sffi 
O-dys' se-a 
Od'ys-sey, (Eng.) 
4<E-ag^a-rUs and 
CE'a.ger(5) 
CE-sn'thaBy and 

(E-:an' thi-a 
OS^ax (5) 
CE-ba'li-a 
CEb'a-lus(5) 
CEb'a-reg 
CE-cha'li-a 
CE-cl?des 
GEc'le-us 
CEc-u-me'ni-uf 
CEd-i-po' di-a 
(Ed'i-pu8(5) 



* Oceaam.'-^So pro&e are tbe English to lay lite accent on tbe penultimate of 
yroTds Q^this tenninati«Dy that we 9carcdy eve^ hear the ^unous Oeeima of Har- 
rington pronounced otherwise. 

t (EtigniM.'-^'nnB d^tbongy like ^^ is prpnonnced as the single vowel e. If 
the conjectore concemhig the 9oawl of a was r^t, the middle sound betweem 
the o and e of the ancient* miast, in fdl proM^ty^ haye been the sound of oar ^ 



OG 



OL 



ON 



71 



CE' me (8) 
CE-nan^ thes 
CE'ne 
GE'ne-a 
CE'ne-us 
CE-ni' des 
CEn'o-e 
CE-nom' a-us 
OE'non 
CE-no' na (7> 
CE-no' ne (8) 
CE-no' pi-a 
CE-nop' i-des 
CE-no' pi-on . 
GEn' o-tri (3) 
CE-no' tri-a 
CEn' o-trus 
CE-nu' sap 
CE' o-nas 
<Ei^o.e(8) 
CE' ta (7) 
CEt'y-lus, or 
CEt'y-lum 
O-fer lus 
0'fi(S> 
Og-dol a-pis 
Og-do' rus 
Og' mi-US 

Og'o-aa) 
O-guK m-a 



O-gyg' i-a 

Ogfy-ris 

O-ic' le-us 

6.a'e-us 

O-i-li' des 

01'a-iie(8) 

O-la^mis 

or bay or or bus 

or bi-a 

Orbi-us 

Ol-chin'i-um 

O-le'^a-ros, or 

Ori.ros(20) 
O-le' a-trum 
O' len 
Ore-mis, or 

or e-num (0,0) 
or ga-sys 
Ol-i-gyi'' tis 
O-lin' thus 
Ol-i-tin'gi 
Orii-us 
Ol-lov' j-co 
or mi-US 
O-lin' i-ae - 
Oi-o-phyx' US 
O-lym' pe-um 
O-lym' pi-a 
O-lym' pi-as 



0-Iym-pi«o-do'ni8 
0-Iym-pi«os'the* 
» nes 

O-lym' pi-US 
O-lym' pus 
Ol-ym-pu' sa 
0-Jyn'tnus 
0-1/ ras 
0-1/ zon 
0-ma' ri-us 
Om'bi(S) 
Om'bri(S) 
(5m'o-le 
Om-o-pha' gi-a 
+Om'pha-le 
Om'jAa-los 
O-nae'um, or 
, O-ae' ne-um 
O-na' rus 
O-nas' i-mus 
0-na'tas 
On-ches'tus 
O-ne'i-on 
0-nes' i-mtis 
On-e-sip' pus 
O-ne' si-US (10) 
On-e-tor' i-de» 
On-e-sic' ri-tus 
0' ni-um 
0n'o.ba(10) 



* Ogyges, — ^This word is by aU our prosodists acoented on the first syllabi^ 
j|Dd conseqaently it must sound exactly as if written Odd^fe-yez; and tiiis^ how- 
ever odd to an English ear, nrast be complied with. 

t Omphak.-^The accentoation which a mere English speaker woald give to 
this word was experienced a few years ago by a pantomime called Hercules and 
Omphale : when the whole town concurred in placing the acctfit on the lecimd 
syllable^ till someclai|sical scholars gave a check to this pronmiciation by 
placing the accent on the first. This, however, veas fivr from banishmg tiMi 
former manner, and disturbed the public ear without torrectiuig it, Those 
however, \rho would not vrish to be numbtrod fimong the mlgar, vmt lake 
«8ure to avoid the penaltisBftte accent. 



7« 



OR 



OR 



OR 



0-noch'o-DU8 

On-o-mac'ritus 

On-o-mar'chus 

On-o-mas-tor'i-Kies 

On-o-mas' tus. 

On' 0'plia3 

On' o-phis 

On-o-san'der 

On'y-thes ^ 

O.pa'li-a 

O-phe'las 

O-phel' tes 

O-phen' sis 

O'phi.^ 

O-phi' on (29) 

O-phi-o' ne-us 

O-phi-u'cus 

O-phi-u' sa 

Op' i-ci 

O-pig'e-na 

O'pis 

O-pil'i-us 

Op' i-ter 

O-pim' irus 

Op-i-ter-:gi'ni 

O-pi'tea 

Op' ^i-a 

Op-pi-a'nus 

Op-pi' di-us 

Op' pi-US 

O'pus 

Op-ta'tus 

Op' ti-muEi 

0'ra(7) • 
O-rac'urlum 
O-rae' a 
Oi^a-S[us 



j Or-W lus 
Or-bil'i-us 
Or-bo'na 
Or'ca-des 
Or-cha'lis 
Or'cha-mus 
Or-chom' e-nus, or 

Or'-chom' e^num 
Or'cus 
Or-cyn' i-a 
Or-des' sus 
O^re' a^des 
Cy re-ads, (Eng.) 
O're^as 
O-res'te 
O-res' tes 
O-res' te-um 
Or-es-ti' dae 
Or' e-tae 
Or-e-ta' ni (3) 
Or-e-til'i-a 
O-re' um 
Or'ga, or Or^gas 
Or-ges'sum 
Or-get'orrix 
Or'gi-a 
O-rib'a-sus 
Or'i-cum, or 

Or' i-cua 
O' ri-ens 
Oi^i-gen 
O-ri'gQ 
O-ri' nus 
O-ri-ob' a-tes 
O-ri' on (28) 
O-ris'sus 
Or-i-sul'la LivT-a 



O-ri'taB (5) 

O-rith-y-i'a 

O-rit'i-as(lO) 

O-ri-im'diis 

Or' me-nus (20) 

Or'ne-a 

Or' ne-us 

Or-ni'thon 

Or' ni-tiis 

Or-nos'pa-des 

Or-nyfi-onOl) 
O-ro'bi-a 

O-ro' des 

O-rroe'tes 

O-rom' e-doa 

O-ran' tas 

O-ron' tes 

Or-o-pher' nes 

O-ro' pus 

O-ro' si-US (U) 
*Or' pherus 

Or-sed'i-ce 
Or-se' is 
Or-sil Iu8 
Or-sil' o-chu9 
Or'si-nes (4) 
Or-sip' pus 
Or'ta-lus, M, 
Or-thag' o-raa 
Or^the(8) 
Or-thae'a 
Or'thi.a(4)(7) 
Or'thru3 
Or-tyg'i-a 
Or-tyg'i-us 
O'rus 
O-ry-an'der 



* Orpheus, — See Idwnenms* 



OS 



ov 



oz 



73 



♦^O-ry' us 
O'ryx . 
Os-cho-pho' ri-a 
Os'ciCS) 
Os'ci-us(lO) 
Os'cus 
O-sin'i-us 
O-si'ris 
O-sis'mi-i 
Os^ pha-gus 
Os-rho-e' ne 
Os'sa 

Os-te-o'des. 
Os' ti-a 
Os-to' ri-ns 
Os-trog' o-tlii 



Os-y-manMy-as 

Ot-a-cil' i-us 

O-ta' nes 

Oth' ma-rus 

Ctho, M. Sal' virus 

Oth-ry-o' ne-us 

Clhrys 

Ctre-us 

O-tri' a-des 

O-troe' da 

Cytus 

Otys 

O-vid' i-us 

Ov'id, (Eng.) 

O-vin' i-a 

O-vin' i-us 



Ox-ar'tes 
Ox-id' a-tes 
Ox'i-mes 
Ox-i'o-na 
Ox' us 
Ox-/ a-res 
Ox-y-ca' nu» 
Ox-yd'ra-cae 
Ox' y-lus 
Ox-yn' thes 
l)x-yp'o-ras . 
Ox-y-rin-chi' tai 
Ox-y-ryn' chus 
O-zi' nes 
Oz'o-lae, or 
Oz'o-U 



PA 

Jta-ca-ti-a'nus 

(21) 

Pac'ci-us(lO) 
Pa'ches (12) ^ 
Pa-chi' nus 
Pa-co' ni-us 
Pac' o-rus 
Pac-to' lus 
Pac'ty-as 
pac'ty-es 
Pa-cu'vi-us 
Pa-d«'i(3) 
Pad' u-a 
Pa'dus 



PA 

Pa-du' sa 
Pa?' an 
Pae' di-us 
Pa>-ma' ni (3) 
Pae' on 
Pae'o-nes 
Pae-o'ni-a 
Pae-on' i-des 
Paei'os 
Pas' SOS 
Pass' turn 
Pae-to' vi-um 
Pae'tus Cae-cin'na 
Pag'a-sae, or 



PA 

Pag'a-sa 
Pag' a-sus 
Pa' gus 
Pa-la' ciiim, or 

Pa-la' ti-um (10) 
Pa-lae' a 
Pal-ae-ap' o-lis 
Pa-las' mon, or 

Pal' e-moa 
Pa-laBp*a-phos 
Pa-laeplK a-tus 
Pa-laep' o-lis 
Pa-laes' te 
Pal-ae-sti'na 



^fTT^ 



Oryiit.— And, at once, Broteasand OryiMslew: 
Oryjui* mother, Mycal^, was known, 
Down from ber sphcrf to draw the laboring moon. 

Garth's Ovid. Met. 



74 



PA 



t>A 



PA 



Pa-te-sti'nus 
Pal-a-me'des 
Pa-kn'ti-a (10) 
Pa-lan'ti-um(lO) 
Pal-a-ti' nus 
Pa'le-is or Pa'te 
Pa'les 

Pal-fii'ri-us Su'ra 
Pa-li' ci, or Pa-Ik' ci 
Pa-m'i-a 
Pal-]-nu' rus 
Pal-i-sco'rum, or 

Pal-i-co'rum 
PalMa-des / 

Pal-la' di-um 
Pal-la' di-tis 
Pal-lan-te'um 
Pal-Ian' ti-as 
Pal-Ian' ti-des 
Pal-Ian' ti -on (28) 
Pal'las 
Pal-le'ne(8) 
Pal'nia 
♦Pal-m/ra 
Pal-phu' ri-us 
Pal-mi' SOS 



+Pam' me-nes 

Pam'nion 

Pam'pa 

Pam' phi-lus 

Pam'phos 

Pam'phy-la 

Pam-pli^'i-a 

Pan 

Pan-a-ce' a 

Pa-nae'ti-us(lO) 

Pan' a-res 

Pan-a-ris'te 

Pan-ath-e-nae'a 

Pan-chaa'a, or 
Pan-che'a, or 
Pan-cha'i-a 

Pan' da 

Pan'da-ma 

Pan-da' ri-a 

Pan'da-rus 

Pan' da-tes 

Pan-de'mus 

Pan'di-a 

Pan'di-on(ll) , 

Pan-do' ra 

Pan-do' si-a (11) 



Pan' dro-sos 
Pan'e-nuSy or 

Pa-nae' us 
Pan-ga^us 
Pa-ni' a-sis 
Pa-ni-o'ni-4im 
Pa'ni-us (20) 
Pan-no' ni-a 
Pan-om-phae' ui 
Pan'o-pe, or 
Pan-o-pe^ a 
Pan'o-pes 
Pa-no' pe-ui 
Pa-no' pi-o» 
Pa-nop' o-lis- 
Pa-nor' mu» 
Pan' sa^ C 
Pan-tag-nos' tui 
Pan-ta'gy-as 
Pan-ta'le-ott 
Pan-tau'chiu 
Pan' te-us 
Pan'thi-des 
Paq-the' a 
tPan'the-on 
iFan'the-us, or 



' * Paknyra, — Nothing can be better ^ed in an English ear than the penulti- 
mate accentuation of this word : this pronunciation is adopted by Ainsworth and 
Lempriere. Gbuldman and Holyoke seem to look the other way ; but Labbe 
says the more learned give this word the antepenultimate accent, and that this ac- 
cent is more agreeable to the general rule; Those, however, must be pedantic 
coxcombs, who should attempt to disturb the received pronunciatieB whtii in 
English, because a contrary accentuation may possibly be proved to be more 

agreeable to Greek or Latin. 

« 

t Pammenea, — ^I find this word no where but in Lempriere, who accents it on 
the penultimate ! but as all words of this termination have the antepenultimatt 
accent, till this appears an excerption I shall v^tore to alter it. 

i Panthem, — ^This word is universally pronounced with the accent on tiie 
sebond syllable in English, butin Latin it has its first syllaUe accented ; and 
this accentuation maizes so slight a difference to the ear^ that it ought to have 
the preference, . 



PA 



t^A 



PA 



7i 



Pan' thus > 
Pan-tho' i-de« (4) 
Pan-ti-ca-pse(um 
Pan-tic/ a^pes 
Pan-til' i-us 
Pa-u/a-sis 
Pa-Dg/lt-sus 
Pa-jwe' us 
Pa-pha'ges 
Pa' fhi-Q, i 

Paph-Ia-go'ni-a 
Pa'phos 
Paph'us 
Pa-pi-a'nus 
*Pa'pi-as 
Pa-pin-i-a'nus 
Pa-pin'i>M8 
Pa-pir'i-a 
Pa-pir' i-us 
Pap' pus 
Pa-pyr' i-us 
PaSr-a-bys' ton 
Par-a-|li'su8 
Pa-raet'a-caB 
Par-ae-to^'ni-utn 
Par'a-U (3) 
Par'a-lus 



Pa-ra'sia(ll) 
Pk-ra'si.us(ll), 
Pai^cft 
Pa/is 

Pa-rial' a-des 
Pa-ris' 1-1(4) 
Par' i-sus 
Pa' ri-um 
Pai^ma(l) 
Par-men' i-des 
Par-me'ni-o 
Par-nas' sus 
Par' nes 
Par-nes' sus 
Pa/ni(3) 
Pa'ron 
Par-o-re' i-a 
Pa'ros 

Par-rha'sia(lO) 
Par-rha' si-US (10) 
Par-tha-mis'i-ris 
Par-tha'oh 
Par-the'ni-a 
t^ar-the'ni-pa?, and 
Parthe' ni-i (4) 
Parlhe'ni-on 
|par-the'ni-us 



Paj/the-non 
Par-then-o-pae' us 
Par-then o-pe (8) 
Pa/thi-a 
Par-thy-e^ne 
Pa-rys'a-des 
fPar-y-sa' tis 
Pa-sJga-d^ 
Fa se-as 
Pas'i-cles 
Pa-sic' ra-tes 
Pa-siph' a-e 
Pa-sith'e-a 
Pa-sit' i-gris 
Pas'sa-ron 
Pas-si-e' nus 
Pas' sus 
Pafa-ra 
Pa-ta' vi-um 
Pa-ter' cu-liis 
Pa-tiz'i-thes 
Pat'mos 
Pa'trae 
Pa'tro 
Pa-tro' cli 
Pa-tro' cles 
JPa-tro' clus 



* JPiQitiw.— This is the name of an eariy Christian writer who first i>ropagated 
the doctrine of the MiQenmom ; and it is generally pronounced with tiie accent 
on the secdnd syllable, b|it I believe coriraptlj, since Labbe iias adopted the an- 
tepenoltimate -accent, who must be ifireU acquainted with the true'pronunciatTon 
of ecclesiastical characters. 

t JfpryittHi, — ^Lahbe tdls ns that some prosodists contend that this word on^ 
to be accented on tin antftpennltiniate syllable, and we find Lempriere has so ac- 
cented it ; but to popolar a tragedy as Alexander, which every where accents the 
pennltimate, has fixe4 tiiis prononciation in our own country beyond a doubt. 

4 Patrodu», — ^Lempriere, Ainsworth, Godldmafin, and Holyoke, accent the 
penoltiniate syllable of this word j but liibbethe antepenultimate : ourgmduset 
pronounce it either way ; but I do not h^tate to prefer the penultimate ac- 
cent : and tju some g|Dod reason be given for the contrary, I think Pttreclea the 
liistorian, and Pairoc{i a small ishmd^ ought to be pronounced wiUi tha same 
ai| Ukk friend of A^hill^* 



76 



PE 



PE 



PE 



Pat-ro-cli' des 

^'tron 

Faf ro-us 

Pa-turci-us(lO) 

Pau'la 

Pau-li'na (7) 

Pau-li' nus 

Pau'lus iE-myl'i-us 

Pa'' vor 

Pau-sa' ni-as 

Pau'si-as(ll) 

Pax 

Pax' OS 

Pe' as 

Pe-da'ci-a(lO) 
Pe-dae' us 
Pe-da'ni 
Pe-da'ni-us 
iPaed'a-sus 
Pe-di'a-dis 
Pe-di-a'nus 
Pe' di-as 

Pe'di-us Blae'sus 
Pe'do 
Pe'dum 
Pe-gas' i-des 
Peg' a-sis 
Peg'a-sus 
PcJ' a-gon 
Pe-lar' ge 
Pe-Wgi (3) 
Pe-las'gi-a, or 

Pe-las-gi' o-tis 
Pe-las' gus 
Pel-e-thro'ni.i(4) 
Pe'le-us 
Pe-li'a-des 
Pe'lUs 
Pe-li'des 
Pe-lig'ni 
Pe-lig' nus 
Pel-i'-nag' us 
Pel-i-nae' um 



Pe'li-on 
Pe'li-um 
Peria 
Pel-la' n» 
Pel-le'ne 
Pel-o-pe'a- or 

Pel-o-pi' a 
Pel-o-pe' i-a 
Pe-lop' i-das 
Pel-o-pon-ne'sus 
Pe' lops 
PeMor 
Pe-lo' ri-a 
Pe-lo'rum, or 

Pe-lo' rus 
Pe-lu'si-um(lO) 
Pe-na' tes 
Pen-da' li-um 
Pe-ne'i-a, Pen'e-is 
Pe-ne'Ii-us 
Pe-nel' o-pe 
Pe'ne-us, or 

Pe-ne'us 
Pen' i-das 
Pen-tap' o-lis 
Pen-the-si-le'a 
Pen' the-us 
Peii' thi-lus 
Pen'thy-lus 
Pep-ar-e' thos 
Peph-re' do 
Pe-rae' a (7) 
Per-a-sip' pus 
Per-co'pe(8) 
Per-co' si-US (11) 
Per-co'te 
Per-dic' cas 
Per'dix 
Pe-ren'na 
Pe-ren' nis 
Pe' re-US 
Per'ga 
Pei^ga-mus 



Per'ge (8) 
Per' gus 
Pe-ri-an'der 
Pe-ri-'ai^ chus 
Per-i-boe'a 
Per-i-bo' mi-us 
Per' i-cles 
Per-i-clym'e-nus 
Pe-rid' i-a 
Pe-ri-e-ge'tes 
Pe-ri-e' res 
Pe-rig' e-nes 
Pe-rig' o-ne 
Per-i-la' us 
Per-i-le' us 
Pe-ril'Ia 
Pe-ril'lus 
Per-i-me' de (8) 
Per-i-me' la 
Pe-rin' thus 
Per-i-pa-let' i-ci (3) 
Pe/ i'pa-tet-ics 

(Eng.) 
Pe-ripb'a^nei 
Per'i-phas 
Pe-riph' a-tus 
Per-i-phe' mus 
Pef'-pho-re' tus 
Pe-ns' a-des 
Pe-ris' the-nes 
Pe-rit' a^nus 
Per' i-tas 
Per-i-to'ni-um 
Pe'ro, or Per'oHae 
Per'o-e (8) 
Per-mes'sus 
Pei^o-la 
Per-pen^na, M. 
Per-pe-re'n6 
Per-ran' thes 
Per-rhae' bi-a 
Per' sa, or Per- je' is 
P^i^sae 



Per-sffi' us 
Per-se'e . 
Per-se'i« 
Per-seph'o-ne 
Per-sep' o-IU 
Per' se-us, or 

Per'ses 
Per'se-us 
Per'si-a(lO) 
Per* sis 

Per' M-us Rac* cm 
Per'ti-nax 
Pe-ru'sia(lO) 
Pea-c«n'ni-us 
Pes-si' nua 
Pe-ta' li-a 
Pet'a-Ius 
Pe-te'li-a 
Pet-e-li' nui 
Pe-te'on 
Pe'te-i» 
Pe-til'i-a 
Pe-ta'i-i (S) 
Pe-tiFi-OB 
Pet-o-si'ris 
Pe'tra 
Pe-tne' a 
Pe-faBJ'Us 
Pe-tri'num 
Pe-tro'ni-a 
P©-tro' ni-ua 
Pel'ti-.is 
Peu'ceCS) 
Peu-ces'tes 
Peu.ce'ti-a(lO) 



PH 

. Peuci'm(4) . 
Peu co-la' us 
Pes-o-do' rua 
Phffi'a 

Phae-a'ci-a(lO) 
PhEE^ax 
Phied' i-mus 
Phffi'don 
Phffi'dra 
Phse'dri-a 
Ph^'drus 
Phatsry-ma (5) 
Pbie-moW o-e 
Pli«n-a-re' te 
Phje'oi-aa 
Phffin'na 
Phsi/nis 
PhiE-oc' o-mes 
Phtes'a-na 
Phaes'tum 
Pha' e-ton 
Pha-e-too-ti' a-des 
Pha-e-tu' sa 
Phie'us 

Pha-ge'si-a(lO) 
Pha'lffi 
Pha-lae'cHs 
Pha-lK'si-a(ll) 
Pha-lan'lhus 
Pbal'a-ris 
Pha'nas 
Phal' a-ru9 
Phal'ta-don 
Pha'le-as 
*Pha-le' re-U8 



PH 77 

Pha-le'ris 
Pha-le'roa, o> 
Phaf e-nim 
Pha-Ie'nis 
Pha'li-as 
Phal'li-ca 
Pha-ljs'i-us(lO) 
Pha-nae'iia 
Phan-a-ne'a 
Pha' nes 
Phan'o-cles 
Phan-o-de' mus 
Phan-ta'Mi-a(lO) 
Pha'nus 
Pha' on 
Pha'ra 

Pha-rac'i-desC24J ■ 
Pha'ter, or Phe'ra 
Pha-ras'ma-nes 
Pha' rax 
Hia'ris 

Phnr-me-cu'sa 
Phar-iia-ba'nus 
Pliar-na'ce-a 
. -t-I'liar-iia'ces 
Pliiir-ca-pa'tes 
Phar-nas'pcs 
Pbar'nus 
Pha'ros 
Phar-sa' Ii-a 
Phar'te 

PWrus ; 

Pha-n/si-i, or 

Phau-ra'si-i (4) 
Pha'si-as 



* Phalereiii.—Tiitre is some doubt among tbe learned nhether tbia woril 
vnght to licpronDiincedJn tlir^c ar four syllables; Uiat a, as Phai-t-nta or 
Pka-lt-re-ia. 'i'hc latt» mode, boHCvcr, with tjie accent oa tbe aDtepeimlti- 
mate, leemi lo I>p tlie must eliglbl*. 

t Pltaniac(s.-—\\\ our prosodisis accent tbe antepenultimate sjrilalile of tliii 
word ; bat an En^lisli ear U stroDgly inclined to Accent the peuoltiniate, as in 
Aihaett vaA Anaeft irtlidi Me, 



7S 



PH 



PH 



PK 



Phar'y-bus 
Pha-ryc'a-don 
Ph^r'y-ge 
Pha-se' lis 
Pha-si-a' na 
Pha' sis 
Phas^sus 
PhauMa 
Phav-o-ri'nus 
Pha-ylMus 
Phe'a, or Phe'i-'a 
Phe-ca' dum 
Phe' ge-us, or 

Phle' ge-us 
PheFli-a 
Phel'lo-e 
PhelMus 
Phc' mi-US 
Phe-mon' o-e (8) 
Phe-ne' um 
Phe'ne-us(lacus) 
Phe'rffi 
Phe-rae'us 
Phe-rau'les 
Phe-rec' lus 
Phe-rec' ra-tes 
Pher-e-c/ des 
Phe-ren-da' tcs 
Pher-e-iii' ce (£9) 
Phe' res 

Phe-re'ti-as(lO) 
Pher-e-ti'ma ' 
Pher' i-uum 
Phc' ron 
Phi'a-Ie 
Phi-a'Ji-a, or * 

Phi-ga'li-a 
Hii'a-lus 



Phic/ o-res 
Phid' i-as 
Phid'i-le 
Phi-dip' pi-des 
Phi-dit^i-a (10) 
Phi' don 
Phid'yJe 
Phig-a'le-i 
Phi' la 

Phil-a-del'phi-a 
Phil-a-del'phus 

Phi'lSB 

Phi-lae'ni 
Phi-lae' us 
Phi Jam' mon 
Phi-lar'chusO'a) 
Phi-le' mon 
Phi-le'ne(8) 
Phi-le' ris 
Phil'e-ros 
Phi-le' si-us (19) 
Phil-e-t»'ru« 
PhiJe'tas 
Phi-le' fi-us (10) 
Phil'i-das 
Phi'i^es 
Phj,li/na 
Phi.li nus 
Phi-lip' pe-i 
Phi-lip' pi 
Phi-lip' pi-des 
Phi-lip' po-lis 
Phi-lip-pop' o-lis 
Phi-lip' pus 
Phi-lis' cus 
Phi-lis'ti-on (11) 
Phi-lis' tus 
Phil'Io 



Phl'lo 

Phil-o-boe' o-lus 
Phi-loch' o-ru^- 
Phil' o-cles 
Phi-loc' ra-tes 
Phil-oc-te' tes 
Phil-o-cy'prus 
Phil-o-da-me'i| 
Phil-o-de' mus 
Phi-lod'i-ce 
Phil-o-la'us 
Phi-Iol' o-gus i 
Phi-lom' a-che 
Phi-lom'bro-tus' 
*Phil-KHme'de-a 
Phil-o-me'dus 
Phil-K>-me'la 
Hiil-o-me'lus 
Phi' Ion 
Phi-lon'i^es 
Phil'o-nis 
PhiJon'o-e (8) 
Phi-Ion' o-me 
Phi-lon'o-^mus i 
Phil' o-nus 
Phi-lop' a-toF 
Phil'o-phron 
Phil-o-poe'men 
Phi-los' tra-tu» 

Phi-lo'tas 
Phi-lot' e-ra 
Phi-lot'i-mus 

Phi-lb' tis 

Phi-lox'e-nus 

Phil-lyl'1-i-us 

Phjl'y-ra 

Phil'y-rcs 

Phi-lyr' i-des 



P/Ulotnedia. 



Nor less l>y Phiiomedm kiiowii on earth ; 
A name deriTcd imintdiate firom her Uirth. 

Cooke's ^mM TMr- ▼• 3ti. 



PH 

Phi-oe' us 

Phin'te 

Phin'td-a8(10) 

Phia 

Phi^e-las 

Phl(^e-diou 

Pble'gi-as 

Phle' gon 

Phle'gra 

Phle'gy-e(6)(8) 

Phie' gy-as 

PhU'as 

Phli' us 

Phte' us 

Pho-be" tor 

Pho-cce'ft 

Plio-cen' ses, and 

Pho'ci-ci(3)(10) 
p]jo-cU' i-des 
Pho'ci-on(lO) 
Pho'ciw 
Pho' cus 
Pho-cjl' i-des 
Phoe'be 
Phoe' be-um 
Phoeb' i-das 
Phoe-bi^ e-na 

Phffi'bu! 

Phoe' mos 
Pfaoe-ni' ce (29) 
Phoe-iiic'i-a(lO) 

PlH&4lic' 6-US 

Pboe-nic' i-des 

Phce-iu'cus 

PbosD-i-ca'sa 

I^oe-nis'iia 

PhcE'iux 

flio'bis 
Phoi'baa 

JMior'cus, or 
PhoKcys 



PH 

Phor' mifl 

Pho-ro' ne-us 

Phd-ro'nis 

Pho-ro' ni-utn 

Pho-ti'nus 

Pho'ti-us (10) 

Phox'us 

Plira-a'tes 

Phra-at' i-ces 

Phra-da' tes 

Plira-gan'de 

Phra-ha' tos 

Phra-nic' a-tes 

Phra-or' tes 

Phras' i-cles 

Phras' i-mus 

Phra'aUu9(10) 

Phra-ta-phei^ nes 

Pliri-a-pa'ti-u9(lO) 

Pltrix'iis 

Phroii' i-ina 

Phron'tia 

Pliru'ri (3) 

Phr^'ge8(6) 

Phrjg'i-a 

Pliry'ne(6)(8) 

Phryn' i-cus 

Phry'nis 

Phi^no 

Phiyx'us 

Phthi'a(14) 

Phthi-o'tis 

Ph/a 

Ph/ cus 

Phjl'a-ce 

Phjl' a-cus 

Phy-lar' chiis 

Ph/ias 

Phy'le 

Phy-le'us 
Phyl'i-ra 
Phyl'la 



PI 7 

Phyl-la'li-a 
Phyl-le' i-us 
Phyl'lis 
Phyl' ii-us 
Phyl-lod' 0-C6 
Phyi'los 

Phjl'lQS 

Phy-scel'la 
Phy-rom' a-chua 
Phys'co-a ■ . 
Pbys' con 
Phya'cos 
PhyS* cus 
Wiy-tal' i-des 
Phyfa-lus 
Ph/ton 
Phyx' i-um 
Pi'a, or Pi-a'li-a 
Pi'a-su3 
Pi-ce'Hi(3) 



(10) 

(4) 



Pi- 

Pic-eii-ti' 
Pi-ee'nu[ 
Pi' era 

Pic' tee, or P 
Pic-ta'vi, or 
Pict' o-nes 
Pic-ta'vium 
Pic'tor 
Pi'cus 
Pi-do' in* 
Pid'y-tes 
Pi'e-hw 
Pi'e-ra 
Pi-«'ri-a 
Pi-ei'i-dei 
Pi'e-ris 



Pi'e-tas 
Pi'gres 
Pi-lum'nus 
Pirn' pla 
Pim-ple' i-det 



80 PI 


PI 


Pim-ple^ e-des 


Pi-siMUa 


Pim-pra'na 


Pi-sid'i-ce 


Pin^a-re 


Pi' sis 


Pi-na' ri-us 


Pis-is-trat'i-da 


Pin' da-rus 


Pis-is-trat' i-des 


Pin' da-sus 


Pi-sis' tra-tus 


Pin-de-nis' sus 


Pi'so 


Pin'dus 


Pi-so'nis 


Pin'na 


Pis'si-rus 


Pin'thi-as 


Pis' tor 


Pi-o'ni-a 


Pi' sus 


Pi-rae' us, or 


Pi-sudi' nes 


Pi-r»' e-us 


Pit'a-ne 


Pi-re' ne 


Pilh-e-cu' sa 


Pi-rith'o-us 


Pith'e-us 


Pi'rus 


Pi'tho 


Pi'sa 


Pith-o-la' us 


Pi'sJB 


Pi-tho' le-on 


Pi-sae' us 


Pi'thon 


Pi-san'der 


Pi' thy s 


Pi-sa'tes, or Pi-sae'i 


Pit'ta-cus 


Pi-sau' rus 


Pit' the-a 


Pi-se' nor 


Pit-the' is 


Pis' e-us 


Pit'the-us 


Pis'i-as(lO) 


Pit-u-a' ni-us 



PL 

Pit-u-la'ni(3) 
Pit-y-ae'a 
Pit-y-as' sus 
Pit-y-o-ne' sus 
Pit-y-u' sa 
Pla-cen'ti-a (10) 
Plac-i-de-i-a' nu» 
Pla-cid'i-a 
Pla-cid'i-us 
Pla-na^si-a (10) 
Plan-ci'na 
Plan' cus 
Pla-taB' a 
Pla-tae' ae 
Pla*ta' ni-us 
Pla'to 

Plau'ti-a (10) 
Plau'ti-us 
Plau-ti-a' nus 
Plau-ske-afnus 
Plau-til'la 
Plau'tus 
*Plei'a-des 
Plei' o-ne 
Plem-myi^i-um 



• Pleiades. 

When with their domes the slow-pac'd snails retreat. 

Beneath some foliage from the burning heat 

Of the Ple'iades, your tools prepare ; 

The ripen'd harvest then deserves your care. 

Cooke's Hesiod, fVorkt a»d:DayK 

The translator had adhered strictly to the original nxnfahc in making this word 
four syllables. Virgil has done the same : 

P/et'ada9,^Hyadas, claramque Lycaonis Arcton. 

Georgic. L 

But Ovid has conti-acted this word into three syllables: 

Pleiades incipiunt humeros relevare patemos. 

Fasti iv. p. 169. 

Tlic latter translators of the Classics have generally contracted t>iis word t» 
three fyllables. Thus in Ogilby's translation of Virgil's Gcorgics, b. 1. 

Fiat 



PL 



PL 



PCE 



8t 



Plem' ne-us (29) 
Pleu-ra' tus 
Pleu' ron 
Plex-au-'re 
Plex-ip' pus 
Plin'i-us 
P/iV/y, (Eng.) 
Plin-thi'ne 
Plls-tar' chur. 
Plis'tha-nui 
Plis'the-nes 
Plis-tJ' nus 
Plis-to'a-nax 
Plis-to'nax 



Plis.to-m'ces(SO) 

Plo'ta 

Plo-ti'na 

Plot-i-nop'p-lis 

Plo-ti'nus 

Plo'ti-us(rO) 

Plu-tar' chus 

Pluftarch, (Eng.) 

Plu'ti-a(tO) 

Plu'to 

Plu-to'ni-um 

Plu'tus 

Plu' vi-us 

Plyn-tei' ri-a 



Pnig'e-ws (13) 

PobJic'i-us (24) 

Pod-a-lir'i-us 

Po-dar'ce(8) 

Po-dar'ces 

Po-da'res 

Po-dar'.ge 

Po-dar'gus 

Pcd' as 

Poec' i-le (24) 

Poe'ni(3) 

Poe'on 

Poe-o'ni-a 

Poe' us 



First let the Eastern Pleiades go down, 
And the bright star in Ariadne's crown. 

The Pleiades and Hyades appear ; 
The sad companions of the turning year. 

Creech's ManHUa, 

Bnt Dryden has, to the great detriment of the poetical sound of this word^ 
anglicised it^ by squeezing it into two syllables : 

What are to him the sculpture of the sliield, 
Heay'n's planets, earth, and ocean's wat'ry field, 
The Pleiads^ Hyads, less and greater Bear, 
Undipp'd in seas, Orion's angry star ? 

Ovid's Met. b. 1«* 

Tills unpleasant contraction of Dryden's seems not to have been much fol- 
lowed. Elegant speakers are pretty uniform in preferring the trisyllabic ; bnt a 
considerable variety appears in the sound of the diphthong et. Most speakers prot 
Bounce it like the substantive eye; and this pronunciation is defended by the 
common practice in most schools of sounding the diphthong it in this manner in 
appellatives j but though Greek appellatives preserve the original sound of their 
letters, as ^iXavrUf 9rpoC«T(ov, «. r. ^. where the t does not .slide into «/^, as in 
Latin words ; yet proper names, which are transplanted into all languages, par- 
take of the soil into which they are received, and fall in with the analogies of 
the language which adopts them. There is, therefore, no more reason for pre- 
serving the sound of u in proper names than for pronouncing the c like k in Pho* 
eion, LacedtenioHf &c. 

Bnt perhaps it will be said, that our diphthong et has the sound of eye as wj^H as 

the Greek ti, To^which it may be answered, that this is an inregiilar sound of thes« 

' vowels, and can scarcely be produced as an example, since it exists but in either^ 

P neitheTp 



S8 



PO 



PO 



PO 



Po'gon 

Po'la 

Pol-e-mo-cra' ti-a 

Pol'e-mon 

Po-le'nor 

Po'li-as 

Po-li-or-ce' tea . 

Po-lis'ma 

Po-lis'tra-tus 

Po-li' tes 

Pol-i-to' ri-um 

Pol-Wti.a(10) 

Pol-lih' e-a 

Porii-o 

PolMis 

Pol'li-usFeMix 

Pol-lu'ti.a(10) 

P6nux 

Po' lus 

Po-Wca 

Pol-y-ae'nus 

PoF y-nus 

Pol-y-ar' chus 

Po-lyb' i-das 

Po-lyb'i-us, or 

PoF y-bus 
Pol-y-boe' a 
Pol-y-boe'tes 



Pol-y-bo' tes 
Pol-y-ca'on 
Pol-y-car' pus 
Pol-y-cas't3e 
Po-lych'a-res 
Pol-y-cle' a 
Pol'y-cles 
Pol-y-cle' tus 
Po-fyc'ra-tes 
Pol-y-cre'ta, or 

Pol-y-cri'tfi 
'^Po-lyc'ri-tu* 
Po-lyc' tor 
Pol-y-dae'mon 
Po-lyd'a-mas 
Pol-y-dam' na 
Pol-y-dec'tes 
Pol-y-deu-ce' a 
Pol-y-do' ra 
Pol-y-do' rus 
Pol-y-ae-mon' i-des 
Pol-y-gi' ton 
Po-lyg'i-us 
Pol-yg-no'tus 
Po-lyg' o-Dus 
Pol-y4iym' ni-a and 

Po-lym'ni-a 
Pol-y-id'^i-us 



Pol-y— la'u» 
Po-lym' e-nes 
Pol-y-me' de 
Po-lym' e-don 
Pol-y-me' la 
Pol-ym-nes' te» 
Pol-ym-nes' tor 
Pol-y-ni' ces 
Po-lyn'o-e 
Pol-y-pe'mon 
Pol-y-pei^chon 
Pol-y-phe'mus 
Poty-phemCy (Eng.) 
Pol-y-phon'tes 
Pol-y-poe'tes 
Po-lys'tra-tu3 
Pol-y-tech' nus 
Po-lytfi-on(lO) 
Pol-y-ti-me' tu8 
Pory-phron 
Po-lyt^ro-^uf 
Po-lyx' e^na 
Pol-yx-en' i-das 
Po-lyx' e«»nus 
PoJyx'o 
Pol-y-ze'lus 
Pom-ax-aei'threar 
iPo-me'ti-a(lO) . 



■iteAMte^i^^ 



Tieither, height y and sleiffht. The two first words are more frequently aad analo- 
Really pronounced eet^ and neether ; height is often pronounced so as to rhyme 
with weight, and would, in all probability, be always so pronounced, but for the 
false supposition, that the abstract must preserve the sound of the verb or ac^ective 
from which it is derived j and with respect to sleight, though Dr. Johnson says k 
<Mi^t to be written slight as we sometimes see it, yet, if we observe his autboritiest 
we shall find that several respectable authors spell the word in thismanner ; and if we 
consult Junius and Skinner, particularly the last, we shall see the strongest* reason 
from etymology to preftfer this spelling, as in all probability it comes from sly 
'llie analogical pronimciation therefore of this diphthong in our own language it 
«fther as Ireard in vein, rein, &c., or in perceive, receive^ &ic. The latter is adcpted 
by many spoakets in the present word, as if written Pleeades ; but Plyaifest^ 
thongblcss analogical, must b^ owned to be the more polite and literary pre- 
fluociatien.— S«e note ^n Elegeiu in the Terminational Vocabulary. 



Po-me'tH(3) 

Pom-v^na 

Po-'mfl''«i 

Pom-pef* (S>i 
PoM-^Ntf'Dna 

Pom-pei'i, or 
Pom -pel' iin 
Pom-pci-op' O^liB 
Pom-pe^us - 
Pom-pil'i-MNti'Bl 
Pom-piri-» 
Pom-pi' hi9 
Pom-pis' cu» 
Poi*>^6' ni-ir 
Pom-po' Qt^^ 
Pom-fb-n-v' not 
Pomp-ti'ne 
Pomp-ti'nut 
Pom' pus 
Pon'b-*(r<^ 
Pou'ti-cum HBt're 
Poo' ti-ciu 
PoD-d'na . 
Pon-ti' nus 
Poii'th-us(lO) 
Pon'tui 

Pon'tus Eu-xi'n«8 
*Po-pil'i-ua I^aus 
Pop-lie' o-h 
Pop-pee^ a Sa-bi'oa 
Pop-pa<ns 
Pc^-u-fe/ nl-a 



a'H-* 



. TO 

Por'ci-* (10) 
P(tf'cMts{lO) 
Vo-nd/o-nx 
Po-ri'iik 
Por-o-ee^-le' ne 
Por-phyr'Mm 
Por-pli^ i-ns 
Por'ji-ma 
Por-sen'nai or 

Pof'st-nfc' 
Por'ti-a, And 
Por'li-iis(lO) 
Poifmoa 
Por-I 
Por-tum' 
Po'ras 
P6-ii'dw 
Pos-i-de'um 
Po-si'don 
Pos-i-do'ni-a 
Po»-i-do' Bi-u8 
Po'si-o (iO) 
Post-Wmt^ 
PoBt-Wtni-ua 
Po3t-ver' ta 
Pos-tu' mi-ns 
Po-Uim'i-des 
Pofa^mon 
Po-thi' DIU 
Po'thoa 
rPot-i-irfa 
Po-ti'n» 



Po-tit'i-ni(«4) 

Pot'iii-ffi 

Prac'ti-nb (KJ) 

Prffi'ci-a(l(^ 

Pras-nea'tB 

Pne'soa 

Pne'ati (3) 

Pra'tor 

Pne-to' ri-M ' 

Prae-tu'ti-ii»(K)) 

Prafi-nas 

Prax' l-as 
Prax-id' a-iam 
Prax-id' i-oe 
Prax'i-la 
Prax-ipk' a-OCB 
Prax-ia 
Pras-Jt' e-lei 
Prax-ith'e* 
Pre-u'ge-nes 
Prex-as* pes 
Pri-am'i-4e8 
Pri' a-mus 
Pri-a' pus 
Pri-e'ne 
Pri' ma 
Pri' on 
Pris-cil'U 
Pris^cW 
Piis'tis 
Pri-ver' nng 



n allow tlic dignity uf die Ronran coromoii- 
laore tliau the conduct eftbii num. He wu 
} Antiactius, king of Syria, uiid was comniissioued 1u 
•rder Unit noDiirch to aiistuin from lioatUitiea against I'tolemy, kinij of Egypt, 
who wu u) ally of Rome. AntiocLus, wlio wSs at the betd of hia anny when 
he received thi> order, nislied to evadeit by equivocal cntTren; but Popiliw, 
with a »tick which lie had in hie hand, made & circle round him on the sand, 
■nd bade him, in the name of the Roman senate mi'l people, not to go beyond 
itbcAreie apokc deciiivcly. This boldness intimidated Autiochiu: hevrith. 
dnw bii prriMiiu from Eg/ ft, mi no lon^ msditated • ww aplaH Ptehtty. 

G a 



84 



PR 



PR 



PT 



Pri-Tei'num 

Pro'ba 

Pro' bus, M. 

Pro'cas 

Proch' o-rn^ 

Proch'y-ta 

Pro-cil'h-us 

Pro-cil'la 

Pro-cil'lus 

Procle-a 

Pro' cles 

Proc'ne 

Pro-cli'da 

Proc-on-ne'sus 
Pro-co' pi-US 
Pro'cris 
Pro-crus' tes 
Proc' u-la 
Proc-u-lei'us (5) 
Proc' u-lus 
Prod' i-cus 
Pro-ef' na 
Prcet'i-des 
Proe' tus 
Pro'cy-on 
Prog' lie 
Pro-la' us 
Prom' a-chu8 
Pro-math'i-das 
Pro-ma' thi-oii 
Prom'e-don 
Prom-e-nse' a 



Pro-me' the-i 

Pro-me' the-us (29) 

Pro-me' this, and 
Prom-e-thi'des 

Prom'e-thus 

Prom' u-lus 

Pro-nap' i-des 

Pro'nax 

Pron' o-e 
'Pron'o-mus 

Pron' Q-us 

Pron'u-ba 

Pro-per' ti-us 

Pro-poet' i-des 

Pro-pon' ds 

Prop-y-le' a 

Pros-chys' ti-us (10) 

Pro-ser^pi-na (28) 

Proper-pine^ (£ng*) 
Pros-o-pi' tis 
Pro-s}Tn' na 
Pro-tag' o-ras 
Prot-a-gor' i-des 
Pro'te-i Co-lum'nae 
Piro-tes-i-Ia'us 
Pro'te-us 
*Pro-tho-e'nor 
Pro' the-us 
Proth' o-us 
Pro' to 

Prot-o-ge-ne'a 
Pro-tog' e-nes 



fProt-o-ge-rii'a 

fPro-to-me-di'a 

Prot-o-me^u' sa 

Prox'e-nus 

Pru-den' ti-us (10) 

Prum'ni-des 

Pru'sa 

Pru-sse'us 

Pru'si-as(lO) 

Prym'no 

Pryt-'a-nes 

Piyt-a-ne'um 

Pryt'a-nis 

Psam'a-the (15) 

Psam' a-thos 

Psam-me-ni'tus 
Psam-met' i-chus^ 
Psam' mis 
Psa' phis 
Psa'pho (15) 
Pse' cas 
Pso'phis 

Psy'che(12) (15) 
Psych'rus 
P8yl'li(3)(15) 
Pte'le-um (l6) 
Pter-e-la' us 
Pte'ri-a 
Ptol-e-der'ma 
Ptol-c-mae'um 
Ptol-e-mae'us 
PtoFe-my, (Eng.) 



• ProthotnoT, 

The hardy warriors whom Boeotia bred, 

PcocleuS; Leitus, Prothoenor led. Pop£'f Horn. Iliad* 

t See IphigenuL 
X Protoinedia. 

Nisa^a and Actaea boast the same, ^ 

Protomedia from the fruitful dame, f 

And Doris, honour'd with maternal name. 

Cooke's Uesiod, Tkeog. v, 4^, 



Ster Iphigiui*, 



PY 



PY 



PY 



85 



ToFe-meOli) 
Ptol-e-ma'is 
PtoFy-cus 
Pto'us 

Pub-lie' i-us (10) 
Pub-lic/i-aCe*) 
Pub-li</ o-la 
Pub'li-us 
Pul-che'ri.a<12) 
Pu'ni-cum beFlum 
Pu'pi-us 
Pu-pi-e' nus 
Pup' pi-US 
Pu-t;e'o-li(3) 
Py-a-nep'si-a (10) 
Pyd'na 
Pyg'e-la 
Pyg-mae' i 
Pyg-ma' li-on (29) 
P^l' a-des 
Py'te 

Py-lam' e-nes 
Py-lag' o-i ae 
Py-kg' o-ras 
Py-la' on 
Py-lar'tes 



Py-la/ge 
P/las 
Py-le'ne 
Pyi'e-us 
Pyl' le-on 

pyio 

P/los 
Py^lus 
P/ra 

Py-rac/ mon 
Py-rac/ mos 
Py-rsBch'mes 
Pyr'a-mus 
Pyr-e-nae' i 
Pyr-e«-nae'u» 
Py-re' ne 
Pyr'gi(3) 
Pyr' gi-on 
Pyr'go 
Pyr-got'e-l«s 
Pyr'gus 
Py-rip' pe 
Py'ro 
Pyr' o-is 
Jy-ro' ni-a 
Py/rha 



Pyr'Ai-as 

Pyr'rhi-c* 

Pyr'rhi-cus 

Pyr^rhi-dae 

I^rho 

Pyf' rhus 

Pys'te 

Py-thag' o-ras 

Pyth-a-ra' tus 

Pyth' e-as 

Py' thes 

Pyth' e-us 

Pyth'i-a 

I^th'i-as 

Pyth' i-on 

Pyth' i-us 

Py^th'o 

Py-thoch'a-iTs 

Pyth' o-cles 

Pyth-o-do' rus 

Pyth-oJa'iis 

P/thon 

Pydi-o-ni'ce(3C9 

Pyth-o-nis'sa 

Pyt'na 

Py t' ta-lus 



QU 

Oua-der'na 
Qua'di(3) 
Qua-dra'tus 
Quad' ri-frons, or 

Quad'ri-ceps 
Quaes-to' res 
Qua' ri (3) 
Qua' ri«us 
Quer' cens 



QU 

Qui-e' tus 
Quiuc-ti-a'ntis (10) 
Quinc-til' i-a 
Quinc'ti-us, T. 
Quin-de-cem' vi-ri 
Quin-qua'tri-a 
Quin-quen-na' les 
Quin-til-i-a'nus 
Qmn-tif i-an (Eng.) 



QU 

Quin-tIF i-us Va' rus 
Quin-tii'la 
Quin-til' lus, M. 
Quin'ti.us(10) 
Quin' tus Cur' ti-us 
Quir-i-na' li-a 
Quir-x-na' lis 
Qui-ri' nus 
Qai-ri'tes(l) 



(86) 



RH 



RH 



RU 



Ra hir'i-us 

Ra-cii'i-a 

R»-Ba' ces 

Ra-mi'seB 

ftam'nes 

Ran' da 

Ra'po 

Ra-sdp' o-lii 

Ra-ven'nit - 

Ra\^o-Ia 

Rau-ra'ci (5) 

Rau-ri' ci 

R«-a'te(S) 

Re-dic' u-lus 

R«d' o-nes 

Re-gil'hB 

Re^il-li-a' mu 

Re^il' lua 

Regu-liis 

Re'mi (S) 

Rem'u-lua 

Re-mu' ri-a 

Re'mus 

Re' BUS 

Re-u-dig'ni (3) 

Rha'ci-a(lO) 

Rha'ci-u» 

Rha-cf/tu 

Rhad-a-man' thoi 

Rhad-a-mis'tiu 

Rha'tb-us 

Rhae^te-um 

Rhffi'ti, or Rx^a 

Rlii»'ti-a(JO) 

Rham-nen' ses 

RJiam'neB 

^^bam-ai-ni' tus 

Rham'iius 

Rha' nis 



Rha'ros 

RbaB-cu' po-ria 

Rhe'a 

Rhe'bas, or Rhe'biu 

Rhed' o-nea 

Rhe'gi-um 

Rbe-gus'ci (3) 

Rhe'mi(3) 

Rhe'ne 

Rhe'm(3) 

Rbe'nus 

Rhe-o-mi'trei 

Rhe'fius 

Rbe-tog' e-nes 

Rhefi-co 

Rhe-u'mw 

Rhex-e'nor 

Rhex-ib' i-u> 

Rhi-a' nu3 

Rhid'a-go 

Rhi-mo?a'clf> 

Rhi'oQ 

Rhi' pha, or Bhi'phe 

i«ii-phi»'i (3) 

Rhi-phe'us 

Rbi'utn 

Rhod'a-nus 

Rho'de 

Rho'di-a~ 

Rhod-o-gy'ne, or 

Rhod-o-gu' ue 
Rho'du-pe, or 

Rho-dp'pis 
Rho'dua 
Rhodes, (Eag.) 
Rhui'bw 
Khce'cits 
Rboe' te-um 
Rhce'tua 



Rhoiu'cts 

Rho'a^s 

Rbox-a'na, sr 
Rox-a'na 

Rhot-a'iii (S) 

Rhurte'Di, zai 
Ru-the'oi 

Rhyo'da-oiis 

Rhyn' thon 

Rh/pae 

Ri-phaB'i(3) - 

Ri-phe' ua 

Rix-am' a-rae 

Ro-bi'go, or 
Ru-bi'ge 

Rod-e-ri'cii» 

Ro'ma 

Home, (Eng.) pro- 
nounced Room 

Ro-ma'ni (3) 

Ro-ma'mis 

Ro-mii' 1-118 

Rom' u-!a 

Ro-mu'li-das 

Rom' u-his 

Ro'mus 

Ro3'ci-us(IO) 

Ro-sif l^sui 

Ro'si-us(U) 

Rox-a' nst 

RoK'^-U' ni (5) 

Ru-bel'li'tw 

Ru'bi(3) 

Ru' bi-coD 

Ru-bi-e'nuq Laj/p* 

Ru-bi'go 

Ru' bra aa' za 

Ru'bri-us 

Ru' di-» 



BU 



RU 



RXJ 



87 



Ru'fe 
Ru-finos 

Ruf-fi'mif 

Ruf'ftis 

Ru-fi'nus 

Ru'fus 

Ru'gi-i(4) 

Ru' mi-nus 



Run-ci' na 
Ru-pil' i-us 
Rus'ci-us (10) 
Jlus-co' ni-a 
RiHsel' lae 
Rus' pi-na 
Ru-te'ni 
Rus^ti-cus 



Ru'ti-la 

Ru'ti-lns 

Ru-til' i-us Ru' fas 

Ru'tu-ba 

Ru' tu-bus 

Ru'tu.li(S) 

Ru'tu-pae 

Ru-tu-pi'iHis 



* 



SA 

Sa' ba 
Sab'a-chus, or 

Sab' a-con 
Sa' bae 
Sa-ba' ta 
Sa-ba'zi-us 
Sab' bas 
Sa-belMa 
Sa.beni(3) 
Sa-bi'na 
Sa-bi'ni(3)(4) 
Sa-bin-i-a' nus (41) 
Sa-bi'nus Au^'lus 
Sa'bis 
Sab' ra-cae 
Sa-bri'n^ 
Sab' u-ra 
Sab-u-ra'nus 
Sab' ra-ta 
Sa' bus 
Sac'a-das 
Sa'cae 
Sa' cer 
Sach-a-li'tes 
Sa-cra'ni 
Sac-ra'tor 
Sa-crat'i-vir 



SA 

SacTa-les 
Sa' dus 
Sad-y-a'tes 
Sag' a-na 
Sag'a-ris 
Sa-git'ta 
Sa-gun'tum, or 

Sa-gun'tus 
Sa'' is 
Sa'la 
Sal' a-con 
Sal-a-min' i-a 
Sal' a-mis 
Sal-a-mi' na 
Sa-la'pi-a, or 

Sa-la'pi-ae. 
Sal' a-ra 
Sa-la'ri-a 
Sa-las'ci (3) 
Sa-lei'us (5) 
Sa-le'ni(^) 
Sal-en-ti'ni (3) 
SaJer'num 
Sal-ga'ne-us, or 

Sal»ga' ne<^ 
Sa'li-i(3)(4) 
Sat-i-na'tor 



SA 

Sa'li-us 
Sa-llus' ti-«s 
Sal'lmt, (Eng.) 
Sal'ma-cU 
Sal-mo' ne 
Sal-mo' ne-iis 
Sal' mus 
Sal-my-des'sur 
Sa'lo 

Sa-lb'me (8) 
Sa'lon 
Sa-lo'na, or 
Sa-lo'nas 
Sal-o-ni'na 
Sal-o^ni' nus 
Sa-lo'ni-us 
Sal' pis 
SaP vi-an 

Sal-vid-t-ef'nus 
SaF vi-us 

Sa-ma' ri-a (30) 
Sam-bu'los 
Sa'me, or Sa'mos 
Sa' mi-a 
Sam-ni'tse 
Sam-ni'tes 
Sam'nites, (Eog.) 



*v_ 



88 



SA 



SA 



SC 



Sam'ni-um 
Sa-mo' oi-um 
Sa^ mos 
Sa-mos'a-ta. 
Sam-o-thra' ce, or 

Sam-o-thra^ ci-a 
Sa' mus 
Sa' na 
San'a-os 

San-cho-ni' a-thon 
*Saii-da'ce 
San-da' li-um 
SauMa-nis 
San'da-ims 
San-di'on(ll) 
San-dre-cot' tu3 
Sau'ga-la 
San-ga'rius, or 

San'ga-ris 
San-guin'i-us 
San-nyi'i-K)!! 
San^to-nes, and 

San'to-oae 
Sa'on 

Sa-pae'i, pr Sa-ph^'i 
*Sa'por 
•f-Sa-po'res 
Sap'pho, or Sa'pho 
Sap'ti-ne 
Sa-rac/ o-ri (S) 
Sa-ran'ges 
Sar-a-pa^Qi (3) 
Sar^a^pus 

Sa-ras' panics 
Sar-din-a-pa' lus 



Sar'di(S) 

Sar'des 

Sar-din' i-a 

Sar'dis,orSai^des 

Sar-don'i-cus (30) 

Sar-i-as'ter 

Sar-ma'ti-a (10) 

Sar-nien' tus 

Sar'ni-us 

Sa'ron 

Sa-ron'i-cus Si' nus 

Sar-pe'don 

Sar-ras'tes 

Sar'si-na 

Sar-san'da 

Sa' son 

Sa-tas'pes 

Sa'ti.aB(10) 

Sat-i-bar-zaf ne 

Sa-tic'u-Ia, and 

Sa-tic'u-lus 

Sa'tis 

Sat-ra-pe'ni 

Sa-tri'cum 

Sa-trop'a-ces 

Sat' u-ra 

Sat-u-rei' um, or 

Sa-tu' re-um 
Sat-u-rei' us 
Sat-ur-na'li-8| 
Sa-tur'ni-a 
Sat-ur-ni' nus 
Sa-tur'ni-us 
Sa-tur'nus 
Sat' u-rum 
Sat'y-rus 



Sav'e-ra 

Sau-fei' us Tro' gns 

Sa'vo, or Sav-o'nm 

Sau-pom'a-tse 

Sau' rjus 

Sa'vus 

Saz'i-ches (12) 

Scae'a 

Sefa 

Scae'va 

Sefva 

Scae'vo-la 

Set?' o^la 

Seal' pi-um 

Sea-man' der 

Sca-man'dri-ut 

Scan-da' ri-a 

Scan-di^na' vi-a 

Scan-til' la 

Scap-tes' y-Ie 

Scap'ti-a(lO) 

Scap'ti-us(lO) 

Scap' u-la 

Scar'di-i(3)(4) 

Scar-phi' a, or 

Scar' phe 
Stau' rus 
Seed' a-sus 
Seel-e-ra'tus 
Sche' di-a 
Ske' di-a 
Selie'di-us(lS) 
Sche' ri-a 
Schoe' ne-us 
Schoe'nus, or 

Sche' no 



* Sandaei.^^A sister of Xerxes, Tirliich I fiod in no lexicographer biit Lem* 
priere, and in him with the accent on the first sylLible ; but irotfi its Greek 
original lAv^awcn it pught certainly to be accented on the second syllable. 

t Sapores. — This word, says Labbe, is by Gavantug and others, ignoniDt «f 
the Greeky accented on the firiit syllable. 



sc 



SE 



SE 



89 



Sci' a-this 
Si' a-this 
Sci'a-thos 
Sci' dros 
Scil' lus 
Sci'nis 
Scin'thi (3) 
Sci-o'ne 
Sci-pi'a-dae 
Scip'i-o(9) 
Sclera (7) 
Sci-ra'di-um 
Sci'ras(3) 
Sci' ron 
Sci'rus 
Sco'lus 
Scorn' brus 
Sco' pas 
Sco'pi-um 
Scor-dis'ci, smd 

Scor-dis'cae 
Sco-ti'nus 
Sco-tus'sa 
Scri-bo'ni-a 
Scri-bo-ni-a'nus 
Scri-bo' ni-us 
Scjl-a-ce' um (9) 



So/ lax 

Scyl'la 

Scyl-lae'um 

Scyl'li-as 

Scyl'lis 

Scyl'Ius 

Scy-Iu'rus 

Scyp-'pi-um 

Sc/ras 

Sc/ros 

Scy'thae 

Scy'thes, or 

Scy'tha 
Scyth'i-a 
Scyth'i-des 
Scy-thi'nus 
Scy'thon 
Scy-thop'o-lis 
Se-bas'ta 
Se-bas'ti-a 
Seb-en-ny'tus ^ 
Se-be'tus 
Se-bu-si-a'ni, or 

Se-gu-si-a'ni 
SeC-ta'nus 
Sed-i-ta'ni, or 

Sed-en-ta'ni (3) 



Se-Ju'ni (3) 
Se-du'si-i (3) . 
Se-ges'ta 
Se-ges'tes 
Se-gob' ri^ 
Seg'ni (3) 
Seg'o-nax 
Se-gon'ti-a, or 

Segun'ti-a(iO) 
S^-on-ti'a-ci (3) 
Se-go'vi-a 
Se-gun'ti-um (10) 
Se-ja'nus £'li-us 
Sei'us Stra'bo 
Se-lem'nus 
Se-le'ne 
Sel-eu-ce'na, or 

Se-leu' cis 
*Sel-eu'ci.a(29) 
Se-leu'ci-dae 
Se-leu' cis 
Se-leu'cus 
Sel'ge 
Se-iim'nus 
Se-Ii' nuns, or 

S^-li'nus 
,Se-la'si-a 



* Seleucia. — Lempnere and Labbe accent this word on the penultimate ; but 
Ainsworth, Gouldman, and Holyoke, on tbe antepenultimate. As this word, ac- 
cording to Strabo, had its penultimate formed of the diphthong n, ZiXyvxtuc, 
this syllable ought to have the accent ; but as the antepenultimate accent is so 
incorporated into our tongue, I would strongly recommend the pronnnciatioa 
which an f.\ giish scholar would giire it at first sight, and that is placmff th* 
gccent on the u. This is the accent Milton gives it : • 

Eden stretch'd her line 



From Auran eastward to the royal towers 
Of great Seteufiay built by Grecian kings* 



Par, Lost, b. 4. 



If, however, the English scholar wishes to shine in the classical pronunciation 
of this word, let him take care to pronounce the c like s only, and not like shy 
which it necessarily has, if the accent be on the antepenultimate syllal^l^.^ — See 
fti4es ^0 and 30. 



90 



se 



SE 



SI 



Scl-Ic' is 

Sel'li (3) 

Se^lym'bri-a 

Sem'e-le 

Sem-i-ger-'inat^Di 

Sem-i-gun' tus . 

Se-mir'a-mU 

Sem'no-nes 

Se-«o'nes 

SeiQoO-saiic'tiis 

Sem-pro' ni-a 

SeiiHpro'iu*us 

Se-inu'ri-iuu 

Se'na 

SeHoa^tus 

Sen^na, or 

Se'na 
Sen' e-ca 
Sen' (Mies 
Sen'ti-us (10) 
Sep-te' ri-on 
Sep-tim' i-us 
Seprti-mu-lei' us 
Sep'y-ra 



Seq' ua-na 
Seq' ua-ni 
Se-quin' i-us 
6e-ra' pio 
*Se-ra' pis 
Se' res 
Ser-bo' nis 
Se-re'na 
Se-re-ui-a' nus 
Se-re' nus 
Ser-ges' tus 
Ser'gi-a 
Ser'gi-us 
fSer-gi'o-lus 
Se-ri'phus 
Ser' my-la 
Ser-ra'nus 
Se'ron 
Ser-to' ri-us 
Ser-vsc' us 
Ser-vi-a' nus 
Scr-vil'i-a 
Ser-vil-i-a'nus 
Ser-viF i-us 



Ser'vi-us Tul'li-its 
Ses' a-ra 
Se-sos'tris 
Ses'ti-us 

Ses'tos, or Ses' tut 
Se-su' vi-i (3) 
Set'a-bis 
Se'thon 
Se'^ti-a (10) 
Se-ve' ra 
Se-ve-ri-a' bus 
:Se-ve'ru8 
Seu'thes 
Sex' ti-a 
Sex-til' i-a 
Sex-til' i-us 
Sex'ti-us 
Sex' tus 
Si-bi'ni(3) 
Si-blur' ti-us 
Si-byl' te 
Si'ca 

Si-cam' bri, or 
Sy-gam'bri(3) 



* Seraph — ^There is not a dissenting voice among our prosodists ibr tiie pro- 
nonneing of this word with the accent on the penultimate syllable ; and yet, to 
riiow th« tendency of English pronunciation, when a irinp of tiiis name had a 
ckfperate engagement with one of the French, which attracted the attention of 
tte Public, every body pronounced it with the accent onthe first syllable. Milton 
hM dohe the same in his sublime description of the grandeurs of Pandemonium : 

■ ■ Not Babylon 

Nor great Alcairo such magnificence 
Equall'd in all their glories to enshrine 
Belus or Serapis their gods ; or seat 
Their kings, when Egypt with Assyria strove^ 
In wealth and luxury. 

Piir. Lost, b. i. v. 717. 

f SergUt«8, — I find this word in no dictionary but Lempriere's, and here the 
Accent is placed upon the penultimate instead of the antepenultimate syllable. 

X Senenu. — ^This word, like SerapiSf is universally mispronoiiaced by the mere 
ln|^ scholar with the accent on the first syllable. 

3 



SI 

Si-ca'ni (S) 

Si-ca'ni-a 

Sic'e-lis 

S-cel'i-dea 

SichK'us 

Si-cil' i-a 

Si>cin'i-us Den-ta' 

tus 
SUci'nus 
Sii/o-riw 
Sic-u-Ii (3) 
Sic'3--oii 
Sisk'e-on 
Sic-y-o' ni-a 
Sish-e-o' ne-d 
Si'de (8) 
.Si-de' ro 
Sid-i'ci'num 
Si' don 
Si-Qo' nis 
Si-do'm-ii9 
Si's. 
Si-^se'um, or 

Sig'ni-a 

Sig-o-ves'sii9 

Si-^JU.Sig'u-Dffi 

Si'gyn'nsB 

Si' la, org/ la 

Sirla'iia Ja'b-a 

Sv-W DIU 

SU'a-iu 

Si-le'niu 

SU-i-<eii*se 

S^phi-uin 



SI 

Sil-va'nus 
Sim-briv'i-us, or 

Sim-bniv' i-ufl 
Si-me'thu9, or 

Sy-me'dHis 
Sini'i-Iae 
Sim'i-lifl 
Sim' nii-as 
Si' mo 
Si'mo-b 

Sini-o-is'i-us(tO) 
Si'moD 
Si-mon'i-des 
Sim-plic'i-ua (24)' 
Sim' u-lus 
Si'mus 
Sim'y-ra 
Sin' di 
Sin-g^i (3J 
Si'nis 
SiD'na-cea 
Sin'na-cha 
Sin'o-e 
St'non 
Si-no' pe 
Si-no' pe-u« 
Sin'o-rix 
Sin'ti-i (3) (4) 
SiB-u-«9'8a 
Siph' not 

Si-poa'tuoi, Si'ptu 
Sip' j^Ium, and 
Si|>'y-I«8 
Si-f e' nes 
Si' rem, (Eng.) 
Si'ris 



SO t 

Sir'i-us 
Sii'mi-um 
Si-sam'Des 
gia'a-i^io 
Sis' e-nea 
Si-sen' na 
Sis-i-^un'tna, at 
Sis-y-gan/bii 
Sis-o-co^bts 
Sis'y-pbus 
Si-tal^»> 
Sitfa'ni-des 
Si'thon 
Si-dio'ni-a 
Siri-us(lO)C«4) 
Sil'o-nes 
Sme'nna 
Smei'dis 
Smi'lax 
Smi'lis 

Smin-dyr' inJes 
*Smii/ dte-m 
Smyr' na 
So-a'na 
So~an'da 
So-a' nea 
Soc' ra-tes 
Sce' mi-as 
St^-di-a 'na 
Sog-di-a'nus . 
SoKo-*, or Syii . 
So-ke^ia 
So' km 
So-lo'ni-om 
So' las 
Sol*y-ma, and 



* ftoiifdm*.— Tliis wnrJ, like Orpheas, and otben of Ihe same form, hm * 
^centoD UieHm^yllubtci bat po«t> o^^eo contract tbe t«o lait lyllatilai in 
»i m Pope 

O, Smiiitheai> qinaig fhun fair lAtiuM'i iQa, 

Ibou^mrdiw pow^ of CUUdN dniBfl 



w 



so 



SP 



ST 



Sol'y-m« 

Som^nu» 

Son'chis(12) 

Son-ti'a-tes 

Sop'a-ter 

So' phax 

So-phje' ne (8) 

Soph'o-cles 

Soph-o-nis'ba 

So'phron 

*So-pliron' i-cus 

Soph-ro-iiis'cus 

Soi'phro' ni-a 

So-phros'y-ne 

S(^'o-lis 

So'ra 

So-rac'tes, and 

Scx-rac' te 
So-ra' niis 
So' rex 

Sa-rifi.a(10) 
So'8i-aGaria(10) 
So-sib' i-iis 
Sos' i-cles 
So-sic'ra-tes 
So-sig'e.nes 
So'si-i (3) (10) 
Sos't-liia 



So-sip' a-ter 
So' sis 

So-sis' tra-tu8 
So' si-US (10) 
Sos' the-nes 
Sos' tra-tus 
Sot'a-des 
So' ter 
So-te'ri-a 
So-ter' i-cus 
So' this 
So'ti-on(ll) 
So'ti-us (10) 
So' us 
Soz' o^meii 
Spa' CO 
Spar' ta 
Spar' ta-cus 
Spar'tae, or Spar'ti 
Spar-ta' ni, or 

Spar-ti-a' tae (22) 
Spar-ti-a'nus 
Spe'chi-a (12) 
Spen' di-us 
Spen'don 
Sper-chi'us (12) 
Sper-ma-toph' a-gi 
Speu-sip'pus 



Spac-te'ri-a 
Sphe'rus 
Sphinx 
Spi'o 

Spho' dri-as 
Sphra-gid' i-um 
Spi-cil' lus 
Spin' tha-rus 
Spin' ther 
Spi-tam'e-ries 
Spi-thob' a-tes 
Spith-ri-da' tes 
Spo-le'ti-uifi (10) 
f Spor'a-des (20) 
Spu-ri'na 
Spu' ri-us 
Sta-be'ri*-us 
Sta' bi-ae 
Sta-gi'ra(l) ' 
Sta' i-us 
Staph'y-lus- 
Sta-san'der 
Sta-sil'e-us (29) 
Sta-til'i-a 
Sta-til'i-us 
Stat'i-nae 
Sta-^ti'ra 
! Sta'ti-us (10) 



* SophronicuB — I find this word in no prosodist but Labbe ; and he places the 
aceenton the penultimate syllable, like most other words of this termination ; 
imlessy says he, ^y one thinks it more likely to be derived from Sophron, than 
from victory; that is, by uniting a general, termination to the root of the word, 
tiian combining it mth another word significant of itself; but as there is a 
Creek adjective loa^^ovutoi, signifying ordained by nature fo Ufnpenmoe^ it is 
]nn«^ more probable that Sophrcnicu» is this adjective used substantively, than 
that it should be compoHuded of z«<}>fwy and vtxo?, eonqii^rmg temperance ; and 
tiierefore the antepenultimate accent seems preferable. 

t ^jporodes— This word has the accent placed on the first syllable by all our 
prosodists ; but a mere English ear is not only indined to place the accent on the 
■econd syllable^ but to pronounce the word as if it were a dissyllable, Spo^ada^^ 
Ibnt this is to gross an errour^ that it c^umot be too carefully avoided, 



ST 



SU 



6Y 



OS^ 



Sta-sic'ra-tes 

Sta' tor 

SteUa' tea 

Stel'U-o 

Ste' na 

Sten-o-boe'a 

§te-noc' ra-tes 

Sten' tor 

Steph' a-na 

Steph' a-nus 

Ster' o-pe 

Stet^ o-pes 

Ste-sich'o-rus 

Ster-tin'i-us 

Ste-sag'o-ras 

Stes-i-cle'a . 

Ste-sim' bro-tus 

Sthen'e-le 

Sthen'e-lus 

Sthe' nis 

Sthe'no 

Sthen-o-boe'a 

Stil'be, or StiVbi-a 

Stil'i-cho 

Stil'po 

Stim'i-con 

Stiph'i-lus 

Sto-bae' us 

Stoech'a-des 

Sto'i-ci 

StoHc^,(Eng.) 



Stra'bo 

Stra-tar'chas 

Stra'to, or Stra'ton 

Strat'o-clei 

Strat-o-ni'ce 

Stra-to-ni'cus (30) 

Stroh' gy-le 

Stroph'a-des 

Stro' phi-US 

Stru-thoph'a-gi 

Stru'thus 

Stry'ma 

Strym'ao 

S try' moil 

Styin-pha''li-a, or 

Styin-pha'lis 
Stym-pha'lus 
Styg'ne 
St/ra 
Sty'rus 
Styx 

Su-ar-do'nes 
Su-ba'tri-i ,3) (4) 
Sub-lie' i-us (24) 
Sub'o-ta 
Sub-ur'ra 
Su'cro 
Sues'sa 
Sues'so-nes 
Sue-to' ni- us 
ISue'vi 



Sue'vi-us 
Suf-fe'nus 
Suf-fe' ti-us, or 

Fu-fe'ti-us 
*Sui' das 
Suil'i-us 
Sui'o-nes 
Sul'chi 
Sul'ci-U8 
Sul'mo, or 

Sul'mo-na 
Sul-pit' i-a 
Sul-pil' i-us, or 

Sul-pic'i-us (24) 
Sum-ma' nus 
Su'ni-ci 
Su'ni-des 
Su'ni-um 
Su-Orvet-au-riF i-a 
Su'pe-rum ma' re 
Su'ra JE-myl'i-iif 
Su-re' na 
Sur-ren'tum. 
Su'rus 
Su'sa 
Su'sa-na 

Su-si-a'na, orSu'sis. 
Su-sa' ri-on 
Su'tri-um 
Sy-ag' rus 
Syb'a-ris 



* Suidas, — ^This word is generally heard, even among the learned, in two aylhk- 
bles, as if written SuUdas. Labbe, however, makes it three syllables, and accenti 
the first; although, says he, by what right I know not, it is generally pronouncei| 
with the accent on the penultunate. It may he observed, that iJT we place th^ 
accent on the first syll4ble, the t in the second mtist be pronoimced like e; and 
that the general pronunciation which Labbe complains of, that of placing the 
accent on the second syllable, most, in our English pronunciation of Greek or 
liatin words, preserve the i in its long open sound, as in me: if, therefore^ we 
pronounce the i in this manner, it is a sufficient proof that we place the aceeat 
on the pennltimatc syllabic } which, though conunooi is^ as Labbe obsenrei, 
without good authority. 



#4 



SY 



SY 



SY 



Syb-a-ri' la 

SifV a-rite, (Eng.) 

Syb'a-tas 

Sy-cin'ira» 

S/e-dra 

S/e-ne (8) 

Sy-e-ne'si-as (10) 

Sy-en-i'tes 

Syg'a-ros 

Sy-le'a 

Syl'e-us 

Syria 

Syl'lis 

Syl'o-es 

Syl'o-son 

Syl-va'nu8 



Syl'vi-a 
Syl'vi-us 
Sy'ma, or S/m^ 
Sym' bo-lum 
Sym'ma-chtis 
Sym-pl^ a*des 
Sy' mus 
Syn-cel' Ins 
Sy-ne'si-tts(lO) 
Syn'geJtts 
Syn' nas 
Syn-na-lax'is 
Syii'nis 
Sy-no'pe 
Syn' ty-che 
Sy' phax 



Sy-phas'un. 

Syr'a-ces 

Syr-a-co'ai-a (10) 

Syr-a-cu'sae(8) 

Sy/a-cuse, (£^.) 

Syr'i.a 

Sy' riiw 

Syr-o-phoe'mx 

Sy r-o-ph(EHM' ces 

S/ros 

Syr'tes 

S/rus 

Sys-i-gam'bw 

Sy-sim'e-threal 

Sys'i-nas 

Sy'thas ■ 



TA 



TA 



TA 



Ta-au'tes 

Tab'ra-ca 

Ta-bur'nu8 

Tac-fe-ri'nas 

Ta^<Jiamp' so 

Ta'chos, orTa'chus 

Tac'i-ta (24) 

Tac'i-tus (^4) 

TiB'di-a 

TaMi'a»rus 

Ta'ni-as 

Ta'ges 

Ta-go'ni-u8 

Ta'gus 

Ta-la' si-us (10) 

TdVus 

Ta-la'y-ra (6) 

Tal'e-tum 

Ttmbyb'i.u8 



Ta' lus 


Ta-phi-as'stis 


Tam'a-fus 


Tap-rob' a-ue 


Ta'mos 
'I'a-ma' se-a 
Tam' pi-US 


Tap'sus 

Tap'y-n(S) 

Tar'a-nis 


Tam'y-ras 


Ta'ras 


'I'am'y-ris 
Tan'a-gra 
Tan'a-grus, or 


Tar-ax-ip' pus 
Tar-bel'li(3) 
Tar-che'ti-us(lO) 


'I'an'a-ger 


'1 ar' chon 


Tan'a-is 


Ta-ren'tum, or 


I'an'a-quil 


Ta-ren' tus 


Tan-tari-des . 


Tar'nae 


Tan'taJus 
Ta-nu'si-us Ger' 


Tar' pa 
Tar-pei'a (5) 


mx-iius(lO) 
Ta'phi-a 
Ta'phiHM 


Tan-pei'us(5) • 
Tar-quin'i-i (3) 
lar-quin^i-a 


Tft'pbi^us, or 


Tar-quie'i-uf 



TA 



TE 



TE 



9* 



Tar.quit' i-us (27) 

Tar'qui-tus 

Tar-ra-ci'na 

Tar'ra-co 

iTar-ru' ti-iM (10) 

Tar'sa 

Tar' si-US (10) 

Tar'sus, orTar'sos 

Tar'ta-rus* 

Tar-tes'sus 

Tar-un'iti-us 

Tas-ge' ti-us 

Ta'ti-an . 

Ta-ti-en'ses 

Ta' ti-us (10) 

Tafta 

Tau-lan' ti-i (3) 

Tau'nus 

Tau-ra'ni-a 

Tau-ran' tes 

Tau'n(3) 

Tau'ri-ca Cher-so- 

ne'sus 
Tau'ri-ca(7) 
Tau.ri'ni(3) 
Tau-ris'ci (3) 
Tau' ri-um 
Tau-ro-min'i-um 
Tau' rus . 
Tax'i-la 
Tax'i-lus, or 

Tax'i-les 
Tax-i-maq'ui-lus 
Ta-yg' e-te, or 



Ta-y-ge' te 
*Ta-yg' e-tus, or 

Ta-yg' e-ta 
Te-a' num 
Te' a-rus 
Te-a' te-a, Te'a-te, or 

Te-ge' a-te 
Tech-me&'sa 
Tech'na-tis 
Tec'ta-mus 
Tec-tos' a-ges, or 

Tec-tos'a-gae 
Te'ge-a, orTe-gae'a 
Teg'u-la 
Teg'y-ra (?) 
Te'j-us (5) 
Te'i-um, or Te'os 
Tel'a-mon 
Tel-a-mo-jil'a-des 
Tel-chi' nes 
Tel-chin' i-a 
Tel-chin' i-us 
Tel' chis 

Te'ie-a(7)(19) 
Te-leb' o-as 

Te-leb'o-ae^ or 

Te-leb' o-es 
Telne-bo'i-des 
Te-lec'les, or 

Te-lec'lus 
Tel-e-cli' des 
Te-leg' o-nus 
Te-lem' a-chus 
Tel' e-mus 



Tel-e-phas('sa 

Tel' e-phus 

Te-le'si-a (10) 

Te-les'i-cla» 

Tel-e-sil'la 

Tel-e-sin' i-cus 

Tel-e*si'nus 

Tel*e-sip'pus 

Te-les'pho-rus 

Tel-e-stag' o-ras 

Te-les'tas 

Te-Wtes 

Te-les'to 

Tel'e-thus 

Tel-e-thu'sa 

Te-leu'ri-as 

Te-leu' ti-an 

Tel-la' ne 

Tel'li-a« 

Tel'lis 

Tel'lus 

Tel-mes'sus, or 

, Tel-mis' siis 

Te'lon 

Tel-thu' sa 

Te'lys(26) 

Te-ma'the-a 

Te-me' ni-uin 

Tem-e-ni' tea 

Tem' e-nus 

Tem-e-rin'da 

Tem' e-sa 

Tem' e-se 

Tem' nes 



* Tuygetuaaad Taygtte. — All oar prosodisU but LeiApriere accent tiiese word* 

on the afitcpenuitiniate syllable, as if divided into Ta-yg^ e-tiis smd Ta-yg' e-it, 

I am, therefore, rather inclined to suppose the quantity marked in his dictionaiy 

an erronr of the press. The lines in Lily's Qua Genus will easily call to tiie 

recollection of every scholar how early he adopted the aatepeuiiltimate proniift* 

ciatioA* 

Tartara, Taygetus, sic Tsnera, Ma&sica, et altns 

Oargarus,'— — " 



96 



TE 



Tem'nos 
Tem'pe 
Ten' e-dos 
Te'nes<2()) 
Ten'e-sis 
Te'nos (26) 
T«i'tj-ra, Egypt 
Ten-^ra, 'I'hrace 
Te'os, orTe'i-os 
Te-re'don 
Te-reu'ti-a 
Te-ren-ti-a' mis 
Te-ren'tus 
•Te' re-US 
Ter-ge:^ te, and 
Ter-^es' turn 
TeVUus (19) 
Ter-i-ba'2ii3 
Te-rid'a-e(19) 
Ter-i-da'tes 
Tei'i^uiB 
Ter-ni£n'ti-a (10) 
Te/me-nw (27) 
Ter-me'siis (27) 
Ter-mi-na' li-a 
Ter-mi-iia' lis 
Tei' mi-nu9 
Ter^mi-sus, or 
Ter-mea'sus 
Ter-pan' der 
Terp-sich' 0-re (8) 
Terp-sic' ra-le 
Tw-ra-ci'na 
Ter-ra-sid'i-ua 
Ter'ti-a(lO) 
Ter'd-us (10) 
Ter-tut-li-a'niis 
Te'tbjs(26) 



TH 

Tc-trap'o-lis 



Teii'cri (3) 
Teu' cri-a 
Teuc'te-ri (3) 
Teu-mes'sus 
T-u'ta 

Teu' ta- mis 

Tuu'la-s or 

T eu-tu' tes 
Teu'thras 
Teu-lom'a-lus 
Teu'to-iii, and 

Teu'lo-nes 
Tlia-btD'Da 
Hia'is 
IWIa 
Thal'a-me 
llia-las'si-iis 
ilia' les 
I lia-lea'trl-a, or 

Tha-lts'tris 
Tha-lo'tes (27) 
JTia-li' a (."iO) 
Thai' pi-US 
Thani'y-1^3 
Thain' y-ria 
'ITiar-gc'li-a 
Tlia-ri' a-dcs 
Tini'rops{2t;) 
Thap'sa-eus 
Hia' si-US, or 

■Dua' si-US (10) 
Tha'sos(C(i) 
riia' sus 



TH 

Tiiau-man' ti-aa, and- 
'riiau-man'tis 
Tau' mas 
ITiau-iiia' si-U9 
The'a 

nie-ag'e-nM 
Tlie-a' gea 
'riie-a'no 
Tbe-a' num 
The-ar'i-das 
The-ar'nus 
The-a-te' tes 
Tiie' bee (.8) 
+ Tliebet,, (Eng.) 
'Hieb'a-is 
Tlie' be, or TlieT)* 
The'i-a 
The'i-aa(5) 
Thel-e-phas'sa 
Tliel-pu'sa 
Thelx-i'on(29) 
Tlielx-i'o-pe 
The-me'Bi-ou(ll) 
The' mis 
The-mia'cy-ra 
Them' e-ii 113 
Them' i-stui 
The-iiiis' ta 
The-uiis'ti-us 
The-mis'lo-clea 
l1itm-i-stog'e-a« 
Tlie-o-cle'a 
The'o-clea 
The'o-clus 
The-o-c!ym'e-nu» 
Tiie-oc'ri-tus 
The-od' a-mas, Of 
Thi-od' a-ina> 



• Terms. — For words of thii tcrmiiiation, »ee Uoaeuaa. 
i Fhtba. — Hiebes iu Egypt was called Htcatonipylia, frora IwTfiig a trandicd 
p,1x»; and Tbebts in Gree«s Btftafjlas, fiow iU »ereu gates. 



TH 

IHie-o-dec' tea 
The-od-o-re'tu^ 
The-od' o-ret, {Eog.} 
. The-orf-o-ii'tus 
*rhe-o-do' ra 
The-o-do'rus 
TTie-o-do' si-US (10) 
The-od' o-ta 
The-o-do' ti-on (1 1) 
The-od' o-tiis 
The-og-ne'tes 

The-oni-ues' tus 
The' on 
'ITie-on'o-e(8) 

The-oph' a-ne 
The-oph'a-nes 
The-o-pha'ni-a 
The-oph' i-lus 
The-o-phras' tus 
Tlie-o-pol' e-mu8 
The-o-pom'pus 
Tlie-o-phy-lac' tus 
Tk e-opk i-lact (Eng. 
The-o' ri-ua 
The-o-ti' mus 
The-ox'e-na 
The-ox-e'ni-a 
TTieHJs-e' ni-tis 
The'ra 
The-ram' bus 
The-ram'e-nes 
The-rap'ne, or 

Te-rap'ne 
Tlie'ras 
The-rip' pi'das 



TH 

Thei'i-tas 
Ther'ma 
Ther-mo'doii . 
Ther-mop' y-lie 
Ther'mus 
The-rod'a-taas 
TTie'ron 
Ther-pan'der 
Ther-san' der 
Ther-sil'o-chus 
Tlier-aip' pus 
Tlier.si'tes(]) 
Thes-bi'tes 
The-se' i-de 
The-se' is ' 
The' se-U9 
The-si' dae 
Th&^si' des 
Thes-moph-6' ri-a 
Tbee-moth'e-t* ' 
Thes-pi' a 
Thes-pi' z^dx 
TTies-pi'a-dei 
Thes' pi-se 
Theg'pis 
Tiles' pi-US, or 

Thea'ti-us 
The8-pro'tia(10) 
Thes-pro' tus 
Thes-sa'li-a 
Thes-sa-'li-oi 
Thes-sa-li' o-l 
*The.s.sa-lo-i 

(30) 
Thes' sa-lus 
Thes'te 
Thes'ti-a 



(29) 



TH . 9 

11ies-d' a-de, and 
Thes-ti'a-deS 
Thes'ti-as 
Thes'ti-us 
Thes' tor 
Thes'^-lis 
TTie'tis 
Theu* tia, or 
Teu'thi* 
Thi'a 
TTii'as 
Tlum'bron 
Thi-od'a-mas 
TTus'bc 
This'i-as(lO) 
This'o-a 

ITio-an'ti-ura (10) 
Tho'as 
Tho'e (8) 
Thorn' y-ris (19) 
Tho'ius 

tUlOD 

Tho'ois 

Tho'on 

Tho'o-sa 

Tho-o'tes 

TTio-ra' ni-Us 

Tho'rax 

TTio'ri-a 

Thor'nax 

Thor'aus 

Tho'ua 

Thra'ce 

ThiVces 

TTira'ci-a , 

Thrace, (Eng.) 

Thrac'i-da!(l<)) 



" TAawofanica.— Thia word, like every otherof aaimilarteriiiinfttion, issiiw 
id be prraioonced by a -mere EoglisU scholar with (Lc accent on Hie tlurd^l- 
MAe ; bnt tbia mnsl be avoirlnd on paiu o( Uteraiy 

t Tliim, a phyiicmn of Fgyp!.— Hilton ipella 



H 



this word with the fioaP ij 



9« 



TH 



TI 



Tl 



Thra' ci» 
Thra'se^(ll) 
Thra-sid'e-us 
Thra' si-US (10) 
Thra' so 
Thras-y-bu' lus 
Thr^^-y-dse' us 
Thra-syl' lus 
. Thra-sym' a-cfaus 
Thras-y-me' des 
Thras-y-me'nus 
Thre-ic' i-us (^4) 
Thre-is'sa 
Threp-sip' pas 
Thri-am' bus 
Thro'ni-um. 
Thry' on 
Thr/ us 
Thu-cyd'i-dcs 
Thu-is'to 
Thu' le (8) 
Thu'ri-ae, or 
Thu'ri-um 
Thu' ri-nu9 
Thus'ci-a(10> 
Thy' a 
Thy' a-des^ 
Th/a-mis 
Thy'a-na 
Thy-a-ti'ra 
Thy-bar' ni 
Thy-es'ta 
Thy-es'tes 
Thym'bra 
Thyni-brae'us 
Tliym' bris 



Thym' bron 
Thym'e-le 
Thy-mi' a-this 
Thy-moch'a-res 
Thy-moe' tes 
Thy-od'a-mas 
Thy-o' ne 
Thy-o' ne-u» 
Thy' o-tes 
^rhy' re 
Thyr'e-a 
Tliyr' e-us 
Thyr' i-on (29) 
Thyr-sag'e-tae 
Thys' SOS 
Tliy'us 
Ti'a-sa(l> 
Tib-a-re' ni 
Ti-be' ri-as 
Tib-e-ri' nu» 
Tib'e-ris 
Ti-be' ri-us 
Ti-be' sis 
Ti-bul'lus 
Ti'bur 

Ti-bur'ti-us(lO) 
Ti-bur' tus 
Tich'i-us(12) 
Tic'i-da 
1-ci nus 
Tid' i-us 
Ti-es' sa 
Tif'a-ta 
Ti-fer'num 
Tig' a-sis 
Tig-el-li' nus (24) 



Ti-gel'li-us 
Ti-gra' nes 
Tig-ran-o-cer^ ta 
Ti' gres 
Ti' gris 

Tig-u-ri'ni (3) 
Til-a-tae' i (4) 
T 
T 



T 
T 
T 
T 
T 
T 
T 
T 
T 
T 
T 
T 
T 
T 
T 
T 
T 
T 
T 
T 
T 
T 
T 
T 
T 
T 



mae a 

mae'us 

•mag' e-neji 

•mag' o-ra5 

■man' dra 

man' drives 

•man' thes 

•mar' chus (12) 
m-a-re' ta 

ma'si-on (11) 
im-a-sith' e-us 

•ma' vus 

•me' si-US (11) 

moch'a-ris (12) 
im-o-cle' a 

■moc' ra-tes 

■mo' cre-on 
m-o-de' mu» 
m-o-la' US 
i-mo' le-on 

mo' lus (13) 
-mom' a-chu& 

mon 

moph' a-nes 

mo' the-us 
-mox' e-nus 



n' gis 
pha 
phys 



making it one syllal^le only, and consequently pronouncing it so as to liiyai* 
Witli t9ne: 

Not that Nepenthe, which the wife of Thone^ 

In Egypt, gave to Jove-bom Helena, 

]b •f Mcb pow*! to stir up joy as this 

CtmiM. 



TI 



TR 



TR 



^ 



Tiph' y-sa 

Ti-re'si-as(lO) 

Tir-i-ba'ses 

Tir-i-da'tes 

Ti'ris (18) 

Tj'ro 

Ti-ryn'thi-a 

Ti-ryn'thus 

Ti-sae'um 

Ti-sag'o-ras 

Ti-sam' e-nes 

Ti-san'drus 

Ti-sar'chusCl^) 

Ti-si'a-nis 

Tis'i-as(iO) 

Ti-siph'o-ne 

Ti-siph'o-nus 

Tis-sam'e-nus 

Tis-sa-pher'nes 

Ti-te'a 

Ti'tan Ti-ta' niis 

Tit'a-na 

Ti-ta'nes 

Ti'tans, (Eng.) 

Ti-ta^ni.a 

Ti-tan'i-des 

Ti-ta' nus, (a giant) 

Tit' a-nusy (a river) 

Tit-a-re' si-US (10) 

Tife-nus 

Tith-e-nid'i-a 

Ti-tho'nus 

Tit^i-a(19) 
Tit-i-a'na (21) 
Tit-i-a'nus 

Wi-i(3)(19) 
Ti-thraus' tes 
Ti-tin'i-us 
Tit'i-us (10) (19) 
Ti-tor'mus 
Ti-tu'ri-us 
Ti'tus 
Tify-nif 



Tit'y-us (19) 
Tle-pol'e-miis(l6) 
Tma'rus 
Trao'lus(13) 
Troch' a-ri 
To-ga'ta 
Tol'mi-des 
To-lo'sa 
To-lum' Dus 
To' lus 
To-mae'um 
Tom'a-rus (19) 
Tom'i-sa 

To'mos, or To' mis 
Tom'y-ris (19) 
To' ue-a 
Ton-gil'li 
To-pa' Z08 
Top'i-ris, or 

Top'rus 
Tor'i-ni(3) 
To-ro'ne 
Tor-qua' ta 
Tor-qua'tus 
Tor^tor 
To'rus 
Tor'y-ne 
Tox-a-rid'i-a (19) 
Tox'e-us 
Tex-ic'ra-te 
Tra'be-a 
Trach'a-lus (1£) 
Tra'chas 
Tra-chin'i-a 
Trach-o-ni'tis 
Tra' gus 
Traj-a-nop'o-lis 
Ira-ja nus 
Trafjan, (Eng.) 
Trarles 

Trans-tib-er-i'na 
Tra-pe' zus 

Tra-sul'lus 



Tre-ba'ti-us (10) 

Tre-bel-li-a'nus 

Tre-bel-li-e'nui- 

Tre-bel'li-us 

Tre' bi-a 

Trc' bi-us 

Tre-bo'ni-a 

Tre-bo'ni-us 

Treb'^u-la(19) 

Tre'rus 

Trev/e-ri (3) 

Tri-a'ri-a 

Tri-a'ri-us 

Tri-bal'li(3) 

Trib'o-ci 

Tri-bu'ni 

Tric-as-ti'ni (3) 

Tric'cae 

Trichfse 

Tri-cla'ri-a 

Tri-cre' na 

Tri-e-ter'i-ca' 

Trif-o-li'nus 

Tri-na' cri-a, o^ 

Trin'a-cris 

Tri-no-ban'tes 

Tri-oc'a-la, or 

Tri'o-cla 
Tri'o-pas, or 

Tri' ops 
Tri-phyl'i-a 
Tri-phil'lis(l) 
Tri-phi'lus 
Trip'o-lis (19) 
Trip-tol'e-mu3 
Triq' ue-tra 
Tris-me^gb'tus 
Trit'i-a (10) 
Trit-o-ge-ni'a (30) 
Tri' ton 
Tri-to'nis 
Tri-ven'tuia 
Triv'i-J4 



100 



TR 



TU 



TY 



Triv'i-ae an'trum 
Triv'i-aelu'cus 
Tri-vi'cuni 
Tri-um'vi-ri (4) 
Tro'a-des 
Tro' as 

Troch'o-is (12) 
Trce-ze'ne 
Trog'i-lus (24) 
Trog-lod'y-tae 
Tro'gus Pom-pe'i- 

us 
Tro'ja 
Troy, (Eng.) 
*Tro'i-lus 
Trom-en-ti'na 
Troph'i-mus 
Tro-pho' ni-us ' 
Tros 

Tros' su-lum 
Trot'i-lum 
Tru-en'tum, or 

Tru-en-ti' num 
Tryph' e-rus 
Tryph-i-o-do' rus 



Try'phon 
Try-pho'sa 

Tu'be-ro(19) 
Tuc'ci-a (10) 
Tuk she^a 
Tu'ci-a(TO) 
Tu'der, or 

Tu-der'ti-a(lO) 
Tu'dri(3) 
Tu-gi'ni, or 

Tu-ge' ni 
Tu-gu-ri'nus (22) 
Tu-is' to 
Tu-lin'gi (3) 
Tul'la 
Tul'li-a 
Tul-li' o-la 
Tul'li-us 

Tu-ne'ta, or Tu'nis 
Tun'gri 
Tu-ra' ni-us 
Tur'bo 
Tur de-ta'ni 
Tu-re'sis 
Tu' ri-us 



Tur'nus 
Tu'ro-nes 
Tur' pi-o 
Tu-rul'li-us 
Tus-ca'ni-a, aiut 
Tus'ci-a (10) 
Tus' ci (3) 
Tus-cu-la'num 
Tus' curium 
Tus'cus 
Tu'ta 

Tu'ti-a (10) 
Tu' ti-cum 
TyVna 
•f-Ty-a' ne-us, or 

Ty-a-ne'u» 
Ty a-ni' tis 
Ty'bris 
Ty' bur 
T/che(l2) 
Wke 

Tych'i-us(12) 
Tych'i-cus(12) 
T/de 



• Troilus. — ^This word is almost always heard as if it were two syllables only, 
and as if written TVoy' lus. This is a corruption of the first magnitude : the 
Towels should be kept separate, as if written Tro' e-lus^ — See Zoilus, 

t Tyaneus. — ^This word is only used, as an adjective to Apollonius, the cele- 
brated Pythagorean philosopher, and is formed from the town of Tyana, where 
he was bom. The natural formation of tliis adjective would undoubtedly be 
TymieuSy with the accent on the aintepenultimate syllable. Labbe, at the word 
Tyana^ says, '^ et inde dcdnctum Tyaneus; quidquid sciam reclamare nonnuUos 
sed immerito, nt satis norunt eruditi.'' 

The numberless authcrities which might be brought for pronouncing this 
word either way, sufficiently show how equivocal is its accent, and of how little 
impoitance it is to which we giv« the preference. My private opinion coin- 
cides with Labbe ; but as we generally fin^ it written with the diphthong, we 
may presume the penultimate accent has prevailed, and that it is tlie safest Xq 
follow. 

% Tydeiw.— This word, like several otlicrs of the same termination, vwis pro- 
Bounced by the Greeks sometimes in three, and sometimes in two syllables^ th9 



TY 



TY 



TY 



101 



Ty-di'des. 
Ty-e' nis 
Tym' ber 
Ty-mo' lus 
Tym-pa'ni-a 
Tym-phae' i (3) 
Tyu-dar' i-des 
TynMa-ris 
Tyn'd^-rus 
Tyn' ni-chiis 
Ty-phoe'us, or 
Ty-phoe'os, sub. 



Ty^pho'e-u5, adj, 
Ty'phqn 
Ty-ran-ni'on 
Ty-ran' nus 
T/ ras, or Tf ra 
Ty' res 
Tyr-i-da'tes 
Tyr'i-i (4) 

Ty-ri'o-tes 
Ty^ro 

Ty-rog' ly-phus 
Ty'ros ^ 



Tyr-rhe'i-dae 

Tyr-rhe'i-des 

Tyr-rhe' ni 

Tyr-rhe' num 

Tyr-rhe'nus 

Tyr'rlie-us 

Tyr-rhi' dae 

Tyr' sis 

Tyr-tae'us 

Ty' rus, or T/ ros 

Ti/re, (Eng.) 

Tys'i-as(lO) 



VA 

V ac-cje'I (3) 
Va-cu' na 
Va'ga 

Vag-e-dru'sa 
Va-gel' li-us 
Va-ge' ni (3) 
Va'la 



VA 

Va' lens 

Va-len'tl-a(lO) 
Val- en -tin-i-a' nus 
Fal-en-tin^ i-an, 

(Eng.) 
Va-le' f i-a 
Va-le-ri-a'nus' 



VA • 

Va-^lef ri-an, (Eng.) 
Va le'ri-us 
Val'e-rus 
VaFgi-us 

Van-daMi-i (3) (4) 
Van-gi' o-nes 
Van' ni-us 



eii considered as a diphthong. When it was pronouncednn three syllables, th« 
penultimate syllable was long^ and the s^cpent wa$ on it as '^e find it in a yerst 
of Wilkie's Epigomad: 

Venns, still partial to t^e Theban arms, 
Tydeu^ son sednc'd by female charms. 

But the most prevailing pronimciation was that with the antepenultims^te ac<« 
cent, as we generally find it in Pope's Homer : 

Next came Idomeneus and Tydeua^ son, 

Ajax the less, and Ajax Telamon. 

Pope's Horn, b. ii. v. 50^ 
ftee liofneneuM. 

H3 



lOfi 



VE 



VE 



VE 



Va-ra'nes 

Var-dae'i 

Va'ri-a 

Va-ri'iii(3) 

Va-ris'ti 

Va' ri-us 

Var'ro 

Va'rus 

Vas-co'nes 

Vat-i-ca' hus 

Va-tin' i-us 

Vat-i-e' nus 

U'bi-i (4) 

U-cal' e-gon 

U'cu-bis 

Vec'ti-us(lO) 

Ve'di-usPol'li-o 

Ve-ge'ti-us^lO) 

Ve'i-a 

Ve-i-a'nus 

Ve-i-en' tes 

Ve-i-en'to 

Ve'i-i(5) 

Vej'o-vis 

Ve-la'brum 

Ve-la' ni-us 

VeMi-a 

Veri-ca 

Ve-li'na 

Ve-li' num 

Ve-li-o-cas'si (3) 

Vel-i-ter' na 

Ve-li' traB 

Vel'la-ri (3) 

Venecia 



Vel-le' i-us 
* Ve-na' frurn 
Ven'e-di 
Ven'e-li 
Ven' e-ti (3) 
Ve-ne'ti-a (10) 
Ven'ice^ (Eng-) 
Ven' e-tus 
Ve-nir i-a 
Ve-no' ni-us 
Ven-tid'i-us 
Ven' ti (3) 
Ven-u-le'i-us 
Ven' u-lus 
Ve' nus 
Ve-nu'si-a, or 

Ve-m/si-um(10) 
Ve-ra' gri 
Ve-ra'ni-a 
Ve-ra' ni-us 
Ver-big'e-nus 
Ver-cel'lae 
Ver-cin-get'o-rix 
Ver e' na 
Ver-giri-a 
Ver-gas-il-lau'nus 
Ver-gel'lus 
Ver-gil' i-ae 
Ver-gin'i-us 
Ver'gi-um 
Ver-go-bre'tus 
Ver' i-tas 

Ver-o-doc' ti-us (10) 
Ver-o-man' du-i 
Ve-ro*na 



Ve-ro'nes 
Ver-o-ni' ca (30) 
Ver-re-gi'num 
Ver' res, C. 
Ver' ri-tus 
Ver' ri-us 
fVer-ru'go 
Vei^ ti-co 

Ver-ti-cor'di-a 
Ver-tis' cus 

Ver-tum'nus 
Ver-u-la'nus. 
Ve' rus 
Ves' bi-us, or 
Ve-su' bi-us 
Ves-ci-a'num 
Ves-pa-si-a'nus 
Ves-pa! si-an, (Eng-) 
Ves-cu-la'ri-us 
Ves'e-ris 
Ve se'vi-us; and 
Ve-se' vus 
Ves'ta 
Ves-ta'les 
Ves-ta'li-a 
Ves-tic'i-us (24) 
Ves' til' i-us 
Ves-tiria 
Ves-ti'ni (3) 
Ves-ti' nus 
Ves' u-lus 
Ve-su'vi-us , 
Vet' ti-us 
Vet-to' nes 
Vet-u-lo' ni-a 



• Vena/rum. — Though the accent may be placed either on the antepenultU 
mate or the penultimate syllable of this word, the latter is by far the prefer* 
able, as it is adopted by Lempriere, Habbe, Gouldman, and other good autho* 
rities, 

t Verrugo. — ^I have givea this word the penultimate accent with Lempnere, 
'm opposition to Aiosworth, who adopts the imtepenultimnte. 



vt 



vo 



vu 



lOS 



V«-tu' ri-a 

Ve-tu' ri-us 

Ve'tus 

U'fens 
Uf-en-ti'na 
Vi-bid'i-a 
Vi-bid' i-us 
Vib'i-us 
Vi'bo 

Vib-u-le'nus 
Vi-bul' li-iis 
Vj'ca Po'ta 
Vi-cen'ta, or 

Vi-ce^ti-a (10) 
Vi-cel' li-us 
Vic' tor 
Vic-to'ri-a 
Vic-to' ri-us 
Vic-to-ri' na 
Vic-to-ri' nus 
Vic-tum' vi^ae 
Vi-en'na 
Vir Ji-a 
Virii-us 
Vim-i-na' lis 
Vin-cei/ti-us(10) 
Vin'ci-us 
Vin-da' li-us 
Vin-der i-ci (4) 
Vin-de-mi-a'tor 
VinMex Ju' li-us 
Vin-dic'i-us (10) 
Vin-do-nis'sa 
Vi-nic'i-us (10) 
Vi-nid'i-us 
Vin' i-us 
Viu' ni-us 
Vip-sa' ni-a 
Vir'bi-us 
Vir-gil'i-us 
FeVgi/, (Eng.) 

u--gm: i-a 



Vir-gin' i-us 

Vir-i-a' thus 

Vir-i-dom' a-rus 

Vi-ripMa-ca 

Vir'ro 

Vir'tus 

Vi-serii-us 

Vi-seF lus 

Vi-terii-a 

Vi-terii-us 

Vit'i.a(10) 

Vit' ri-cus 

Vi-tru' vi-us 

Vit'u-la 

Ul-pi-a' nus 

Ul^pi-an, (Eng.) 

UMu-br». 

•U-lys' ses 

Um' ber 

Um' bra 

Um'bri-a 

Um-brig' i-us (€4) 

Um' bro 

Un'ca 

Un' chae 

Un-de-cem'v4-ri (3) 

U-neni(5) 

Unx' i-a 

Vo-co'ni-a 

Vo-co' ni-us 

Vo-con'ti-a(lO) 

Vog' e-sus 

Vol-a-gin' i-us 

Vo-la'na 

Vo-lan' dum 

Vol-a-ter'ra 

Vol'cae, or 

Vol'gae 
Vo-log' e-sea 
Vo-log' e-sus 
Vol' scens 
Vol'sci, or Vol'ci 
H 4 



Vol-«in'i-um 
Vol-tiu'i-a 
Vo-lum'nae Fa'num 
Vo-lum'ni-a 
Vo-luni'nu« 
Vo-lum' ni-us 
Vo-lup'tas, and 
Vo-lu'pi-a 
Vol-u-^se'nus 
Vo-lu-si-a'nus 
Vo-lu' si-US (10) 
Vol'u-sus 
VoMux 
Vo-ma'nus 
Vo-no'nes 
Vo-pis'cus 
Vo-ra' nus 
Vo-ti-e' nus (22) 
U-ra'ni-a 

U-ra'ni-i, or U*ri-i 
U'ra-nus 
Ur-bic' u-^ 
Ur' bi-cus 
U'ri-a 
U' ri-tes 
Ur-sid' i-us 
Us-ca'na 
U-sip'e-tes, or 
U-sip'i-ci (3) 
Us-ti' ca 
U'ti-ca 

Vul-ca-na'lira 
Vul-ca' ni 

Vul-ca' ni-us 

Vul-ca'nus 

Vu^cauy (Eng.) 

Vul-ca'ti-us (10) 

Vttl'so 

Vul'tu-ra 

Vul-tu-re'i-i^ 

Vul.tu'ri-us 

Vul-tur'nuiil 



104 



vu 



ux 



uz 



Vul-tur' niMi 
Vul-si'num 



Ux-el-lo-du' num 
Ux'w (3) 



Ux-is' a-ma 
U' zi-ta 



i^mimmim^i^mm 



XE 

Xan'th? (17) 
Xan'Ai " 
Xan' thi^ 
Xan' thi-ca 
Xan-thip^pe 
Xan*thip' pus 
X^n' tho 
Xan-tho-pu' lus 
Xan^ thus 
'^an^ti-cle^ 
Xau-tip'pe 
Xan-tip^pus 
Xe-nag' o-ras 



XE 

Xe-nar'chus 

Xen' a-res 

Xen'e-tus 

Xe'ne-us 

X^ni'a-degi 

Xe'ni-us 

Xen-o-cle'^ 

Xen' o-cles 

Jfen-ocli'd^s 

Xe-noc'ra-tes 

Xe-nod' a-mus 

Xe-nod'i-ce 

Xe-nod' o-chus 



XY 

Xen-o-do' rus 
Xe-nod' o-tus 
Xe-noph' a-nes 
Xe-noph' i-lus 
Xen' o-phon 
' I Xen'o-phon-ti'ui, 
Xen-o-pi-thi'a 

Xerx'es(17) 
Xeu'xes 
Xu' thus 
X/ chus 
Xyii' i-as 
Xyn-o-ich'i-a 



wm 



ZA 

Zab'a-tus (19) 

(27) 
Zab-di-ce^ne 
Za^bh/ na 
Zal>^u-lus 
Za-cyn' thus 
Za-grae^us 
Za'grus 
Zal'a-tes(19) 
Za-leu^cus 



ZA 

Zoi^mz, or Zag^ma 
Za' me-is 
Za-moFxis 
Zan' cle 
Zan^ the-nes 
Zan'thi-cles 
2^^ rax 
Zar-bi-e' nus 
Zar«iWpes 
Za'thes 



ZE 

Ze-bi' na 

Ze' la, or Ze'li-a 

Ze' les 

Ze-lot'y-p^ 

ZeMus 

Ze'no 

Ze-po'bi-a 
Zen' o-cles 
Zen-o-cli'des 
Zen-o-do' rus 



ZE 



ZO 



ZY 



lOS 



;Zen.o-do'ti.a 
*Ze-uod' o-tus 
Ze-noth'e-mis 
Zt3-r..ph'a-nes 
Zerphyr' i-um 
Zeph'y-rus 
Zeph'y-rum 
Ze-rjii' thus 
Ze'thes, or Ze'tus 
Zeu-gi-ta' na 
Zeug' ma 
Ze'ua 

Zeux-id' a-mus 
Zeux' i-das 



Zeu-xip' pe 

Zeu'xis 

Zeu' xo 

Zi-gi'ra 

Zii' i-a, or Ze' lig 

Zi-pae' tes 
Zi-ob' e-ris 
Zmira-ces (16) 
fZo' i-lus (29) 
Zo-ip' pus 
Zo'na 
Zon' a-ras 
Zoph' o-rus 



Zo-pyr' iro 
Zo-pyr'i-on 
Zop'y-rus (19) 
Zor-p-as' ter 
Zos' i-mus 
Zos' i-ne 
2A)S-te' ri-a 
Zo-thraus' tes 
Zy-gan' tes 
Zyg' e-na 
ZyV i-a 
Zy-gom' a-la 
Zy-gop' o-lis 
Zy-gri' t^ 



* Zenodotus, — ^All onr prosodists but Lempriere p\t this word the s^tfpemil- 
timate accent ; and till a good reason is given wh> it should differ from Herod' 
otu8, I must beg leave to follow the majority. 

t Zoilus, — ^The two vowels in this word are always separated in the Greek . 
and Latin, but in tiie English pronunciation of it they are frequently blended 
|nto a diphthong, as in the words oil, boil, &c. This, however, is an illiterate \ 
pronunciation, and should be avoided. The word should have three syllables, 
9nd be pronounced as if written Zo' e-hu. 



By inspecting the foregoing Vocabulary, we see that, notwith-r 
standing all the barriers with which the learned havje guarded the 
{iccentuation of the d^ad languages, still some words there are 
>vhicb despise their laws, and byldly adopt the analogy of Engli^ 
pronunciation. It is true the catalogue of tliese is not very nii- 
merous ; for, as an error of this kind incurs the penally of being 
thought illiterate and vulgar, it is no wonder that a pedantic ad- 
herence to Gre^k and Latin should, in doubtful cases, be gene- 
rally preferred. 

But as the letters of the dead languages have insensibly 
changed their sound by passing into the living ones, so it is. 



( 108 ) 

impossible to preserve the accent from sliding sometimes into the 
analogies of our own tongue; and when once words of this kind 
are fixed in the public ear^ it is not only a useless^ but a pemi- 
cious^ pedantry to disturb them. Who could hear without pity 
of Alexander's passing the river Grani'cus, or of his marrying 
the sister of Parysfatis? These words, and several others, 
must be looked upon as planets shot from their original spheres^ 
and moving round another centre. 

After all the care, therefore, that has been taken to accent 
words according to the best authorities, some have been found 
«o differently marked by different prosodists, as to make it no 
easy matter to know to which we shall give the preference. In 
this case I have ventured to give my opinion wdthout presuming 
to decide, and merely as an 'HywTJxoy, or Interim, till the learned 
faave pronounced the final sentence. 



PREFACE 



TO THE 



TERMINATIONAL VOCABULARY. 



1 A KING a retrospective view of language^ or surveying it in 
its terminations^ affords not only a new but an advantageous 
view of all languages. The necessity of this view induced me, 
several years ago, to arrange the whole English language ac- 
cording to its terminations ; and this arrangement I found of in- 
finite use to me in cotlsulting the analogies of our tongue. A 
conviction of its utility made me desirous of arranging the 
Greek and Latin proper names in the same manner, and more 
particularly as the pronunciation of these languages depends 
more on the termination of words than any other we are ac- 
quainted with. Of such utility is this arrangement supposed 
to be in the Greek language, that the son of the famous, 
Hoogeven, who wrote on the Greek particles, has actuallj 
printed such a dictionary, which only waits for a preface to 
be published. The labour of such a selection and arrange- 
ment must have been prodigious'; nor is the task I have under- 
taken in the present work a slight one ; but the idea of render- 
ing the classical pronunciation of proper names still more easy 
encouraged me to persevere in the labour, however dry and fa- 
tiguing. 

. I flattered myself I had already promoted this end, by di- 
viding the proper names into syllables upon analogical princi- 
ples ; but hoped I could still add to the facility of recollecting 
their pronunciation by the arrangement here adopted; whi9.fa^ 



( .108 ) 

in the first place^ exhibits the accent and quantity of every wcffd 
by its termination. 

In the next place, it shows the extent of this accentuation, by 
producmg, at one view, all the words differently accented, by 
which means may be formed the rule and the exception. 

Tfhirdly, when the exceptions are hut few, and less apt to he 
regarded, — by seeing them contrasted with the ^ule, they are im- 
printed more strongly on the memory, and are the more easily 
recollected. Thus, by seeing that Sperchius, XenophoHtiuSy and 
Darius^ are the only words of that very numerous termination 
which have the accent on the penultimate ; we are at perfect ease 
about all the r«st. 

• Foui^tyy> by seeing that all words endii^ in enes have uni- 
versally the antepenultinxate accent, we easily recollect that the 
pronunciation of Eummes with the accent on the penultimate is 
radically wrong, and is only tolerated because adopted by some 
respectable writers. Thus, too, the numerous termination in 
ades is seen to be perfectly antepenultimate ; and the ambiguous 
termination in ides is freed in some measure from its intricacy, 
by seeing the extent of both foi^ms contrasted. *This contrast, 
without being obliged to go to Greel^ etymologies, shows at oite 
view when this termination has the accent to the penultimate i, 
as in Tydides ; and when it transfers the accent to the antepe- 
nultimate, as in Thucydides; which depends entirely on the 
quantity of the original word from which these patronymics *re 

formed. 

And, lastly, when the number of words pronounced with a difr 
ferent accent are nearly equal, we can at least find some way of 
recollecting their several accentuations better than if they were 
promiscuously mingled with all the rest of the words in die laiir 
guage. By frequently repe^tigg them as they stand together, 
the ear will gain a habit of placing, the accent properly, without 
knowing why it does so. in short, if Labbe^s Catholici Indicts j 
which is in the hands of all the learned, b^ useful for readily 
finding the accent and quantity of proper names, the present 
Judex cannot fail to be much more so, as it not only associates. 



( 109 ) 

them by their accent and quantity, but according to their termi- 
nation also ; and by this additions^l association it must necessa-^ 
rily render any' diversity of accent more easily perceived and re-^ 
membered. 

To all M^hich advantages it may be added, that this arrange- 
ment has enabled me to point oiit the true sound of every ter- 
mination; by which means those who are totally unacquainted 
with the learned languages will find themselves instructed in the 
true pronunciiation of the final letters of every word, as well as 
its accent and quantity. 

It need scarcely be observed, that in the following Index al- 
most all words of two syllables are omitted : for, as dissyllables 
in the Greek and Latin languages are always pronounced with 
the accent on the first, it was needless to insert them. The same 
may be observed of such words as have the vowel in the penult 
timate syllable followed by two consonants: for in this case, 
unless Ae former of these consonants was a mute, and die 
latter a liquid, the penultimate vowel was always long, and 
consequently always had the accAit. This analogy takes place 
in our pronunciation of words from the Hebrew ; which, with 
the exceptions of some few that have been anglicised, such as 
Bethleheniitey Nazar4!ne, Sec, have die accent, like die Greek 
and Latin words, either on the penuldmate or antepenultimate 
syllable. 

It might have been expected that I should have confined my- 
self to the insertion of proper names alone, without bringing in 
the gentile adjectives, as they are called, which are derived from 
them. This omission \^ould, undoubtedly, have saved me im- 
mense trouble; but these adjectives, being sometimes used as 
substantives, made it difficult to draw the line ; and as the ana- 
logy of accentuation was, in some measure, connected with these 
adjectives, I hoped the trouble of coHectiug and arranging them 
would not be entirely thrown away. 



TERMINATIONAL VOCABULARY 



OB 



CREEK and LATW PROPER J^AMES, 



A A 

Accent the Antepenultimatt. 

A.BAA*, Nausicaa. 

B A 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Ababa, D^sudaba, Alaba, AUaba, Aballaba, Cillaba, Adeba, 
Abnoba, Onoba, Arnoba, Ausoba, Hecuba, Gelduba, Corduba^ 
Voluba, Rutuba. 

ACA EGA tic A OCA UCA YCA 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Cleomca, Thessalonica, Veronica^ Noctiluca, Donaca, 

Accent the Antepevtaltimate. 

Itt^ca^ Andjiaca, Mialaca, Tabraca, Mazaca, Seneca, C^rre.- 
naica, Belgica, Georgica, Cabalica, Italica, Maltilica, Bellica, 
Laconica, Leonica/Marica, Marmarica, Conimbrica, Merobric^, 
Mirobrica, Cetobrica, Anderica, America, Africa, Arborica, 
Aremorica, Armorica, Norica, Tetrica, Asturica, Illyrica, Nasi- 

* As the accent is never on the last syllable of Greek or Latin proper names, 
the final a must be pronounced as in English words of this termination ; tiiat is, 
nearly as the interjection oh! — See Rule 7 prefixed to the Initial Vocabulary* 

t Of all the words ending in ieoy Cleonica, Vercnicuy and Thessahnica are the 
«nly three which have the penultimate accent — See Rule the 29th prefixed tt 
ihtt Initu^ fooalMaFyf avd ths worda jMimfmfw uid^hf^Mau. 



( lis ) 

ca, Esica, Corsica, i^thatica, Boetica, Ceretica, Anaitica^ Celti-i- 
ca, Salmantica, Cyrrhestica^ Ustica, Utica^ £i^[ravic»> Oboca^ 
Amadoca^ Aesyca, Miityca. 

DA 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Abdeda^ Itecameda, Diomeda^ Aihida^ Actrida^ 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Aada, Adada^ Symada, Bagrada, Suada, Idubeda, Andromeda^ 
Ceneda^ Agneda, Voneda^ Candida^ Egida, Anderida^ Florida"*^, 
Pisid^. 

-as A 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Dicsea^ Nicxa^ and all words of this tenninadon* 

E A 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Laodicea^ Stratonicea, Cymodocea, Medea, Ligea^ Argen^ 
Amathea^ Alphea, Erythea, Ethalea, Malea, Heraclea, Amphi- 
clea, Theoclea, Agathoclea, Androclea, Euryclea, Penthesileiiy 
Aclullea, Asbamea, Alcidamea, Cadmea, Elimea, Mneety Man- 
tinea, Mardnea, Cbaeronea, iEpea, Barea, Caesarea, Neocaesarea, 
Cytherea, Ipsea, Hypsea, Galatea, Platea, Myrtea (a city). 

Accent the AntepeniiHimate. 

Phamacea, Ardea, Tegea, ^thea, Dexithea, Leucothea, Alea^ 
Doclea, Dioclea, Elea, Marcellea, Demea, Castanea, Aminea, 
Ficulnea, Albunea, Boea, Clupea or Clypea, Abarbarea, Cha^ 
rea, Verrea, Laurea, Thyrea, Rosea, Odyssea, Etea, Tritea, 
Myrtea (a name of Venus), Butea> Abazea* 

CE A 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Meleboea, Eubcea, and all words of this termination. 



* Labl)e tells us that some of the most learned men prouovnce tbif part ^ 
Aneika with the accent on the penultimate syNable. 



( 113 > 

■G A ■ . . •> 

' ,- ' Accettt the Antepenmhimate. 

Abaga, Bibaga, Amp^ga, Aganzag^', Nbega, Aitibriga, ho» 
bfiga, Segobr^, Ct^liobriga, Ravidbriga. 

' .H A ''• , ■•• 
Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Malacha, Pyrrhicai^ Adatha, , Agatha^ Badenatha^ Abaratha, 

Monumetha. ' 

• ..... 

• ■ Ai A ; 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Achaia,* Panbhaia, Aglaia, Maia> 

•■'.' ■. B.t A ■■■ . 

Accent the Antepenultimate i 

Arabia^ Trebia, Coflt^ebia, Albia, Balbia> Olbia, Corymbix^ 
Zenobia, Cornubia, 

CiAf 

Accent the. Antepenultimate. 

Nicacia, Dacia, Salacia^ Wormacia, Tliaiiniacia, Connacia, 
Ambraciay Thracia, Samothrajciay Artacia/ Accia, Gallacia^ 
Graecia, Voadicia, VindeKcia, Ciii<;ia^ Libyphoenic^a, Aricia^ 
Chalcia, Frahcia, Provincis^, Cappadocia^ Porcia, Muscia, Ascia, 
Iscia, Thuscia, Boruscia^ S^leucia,J Tucia, Lycia, 

t) I A 

Accmt the Penultimate* 
Iphimedia^l Laomedia, jBrotomedia. 



,\ 



* tht voweli in this termUisitioii dd not form ft cbphdiong. The accetit i» 
upon the first a, the t pr6iioilnced is like y consobant in y^dr, and the filial a 
ttesuiy like the a ih father, or the interjectioi^ ah /--See Rule 7. 

t Words of this termination have the da pronomiced as if writteri $he-a^*S%% 
Role 10, prefaced to the Jmiial VocabuUay. 

' t See' Role 30, and thfe word in the Initiia VocobuUtryi 

$ See Ipihigenia in the Initiat Voiubulary* 

•'•: I 



( 114 ) 

Accent the Antepentdtifnate. 

Badia, Arcadia, Leuctdia, Media, Iphimedia, Nicomedia, 
Polymedia, Eporedia, Corsedia, Suedia, Fordicidis^, Numidia, 
Canidia, Japidia, Pisidia, Gallovidia, Scandia, India, Burgundk^, 
Ebodia, Clodia, ^rodia, Loi^obardia, Cardia, Verticordia, 
Concordia^ Discordia, Herephordia, Claudia, Lydia. 

E I A 

Accent the Penultimate. , ' 

El^eia,* Hygeia, Antheia, Cartheia, Aquileiay Pompeia, 
Deiopeia, Tarpeia, Carteia. 

GIA 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Sphagia, liagia, Athana^a, Norvigia, Cantabrigla, Ortigia, 
Langia, Eningia, Finningia, Lotharii^ia, Turingia, Sergia, Or- 
gia, Pelasgi^, Fi^a, Rugia, Ogygia, Jopygia, Pbrygia, Zygia. 

H I A 

Accent the Penultimate., 
Sophifii Authia, Erythia, Xenopithia. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Valachia, Lysimachia^ Centauromachia, Inachia, Xynsichia, 
Antiochia, Amphilochia, Munychia, Philadeli^ua, Apostrophisi, 



* The ancienta sometimes separated the Yoweli «t in this terminalioD, nsA 
sometimes pronounced them as a diphthon^» Hie general mode of pronounc- 
ing them with us is to consider them as a diphthong, and to pronounce it as long 
or double e; which from its squeezed somid, iq[>proaches to tlie initiad y, and 
makes these words pronounced as if written EUe-j&yahy Hv-j&yahy &c. This Is 
the pronunciation which ou^it to be adopted ; but scholars who are fond oT 
displaying their knowled^ of Greek will be sure to pronounce Ekseia^ Htflt^«h 
or rati^er Hypeia, AiUheia, and DeiopHa, iHth the mphihong likettie Qoun effc : 
while Car^A^za, or Carteioj Aquileimf Pompeioj and Tarpeia, of Latin originilt 
are permitted to have their dipbtiiongs sounded like double e, or, whidi is 
nearly the sanie tiling if the Yowels are separated, to sound the f leagas in 
equalj and the t as y consonant, ardcnlating tiie fimd a.--See note oa Adutku 

For a more complete idea of the sound of this diphthong, sae the word 
Pleiades in the Initial Vocabulary. To. inrhich obaenrations we may add, that 
when this diphthong in Greek is reduced to the single long i in Ijitlo, as in 
fyhiffenioy EkgiOf &c. it is pronounced like single t, that is, Uke liie noun eye. 



( 115 ) 

Scarphia, Acryphia, Eniathia^ MmsAhiaL, Alethia, Hyacinthiay 
.Cariiitiua> Tynniim, Cynthia^ Tyrynthia, Parthia^ Scythia^ 
INtiiia. 

LI A 

Accent the Penultimate!^ 

Thalia, Aristoclia, Basilia. 

Accent the Antepenultimate i 

CEbalia, Fornicalia, Lupercsdia, Acidalia, Vaiidalia^ F^odalia, 
Megalia, Robigalia, Fi^alia, CEchalia^ Westphalia, '^thalia, 
AlaUa, Vidcanalia, Paganalia, Bacchanalia, Terminalia, Fonti- 
naUa, VertumDalia, Portumnalia, Agonalia, Angeronalia, Satur- 
nalia, Faunalia, Portunalia^ Opalia, Liberalia, Feralia, Floralia, 
Lemuralia, Salia, Pharsalia, Tliessalia, Italia, Italia, Compita- 
lia, Carmontalia, Laurentulia, Castalia, Attalia, Psytalia, Mam- 
blia, £Iia, Coelia, Belia, Celia, Decelia, Agelia, Helia, Corne- 
lia, Cloelia, Aspelia, Cerelia, Aurelia, Velia, Anglia, CsBcilia, 
Sicilia, ^gilia, Cingilia, Palilia, iEmilia, ^iiilia, Venih'a, Pa- 
rilia, Basilia, Absilia, Hcrsilia, Massilia, Atilia, Anatilia, Petilia, 
Antilia, Quintllia, Hostilia, Cutilia, Aquilia, Servilia, Elapho- 
bolia, Ascolia, Padolia, ^olia, Folia, Natolia, Anatolia, ^tolia 
Nauplia, Daulia, Figulia, Julia, Apulia, Gaetiilia, Getutia,, 
Triphylia, Pamphylia. 

M t A 

Accent the Penultimate, 

* Deidamia, Laodamia, Hippodamia, Astydamia, Apamia, 
Hydramia. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Lamia, Mesopotamia, Cadmia, Acadcmia, Arcfaidemia, Eu- 
dcmia, Isthmia, Holmia, Posdiumia. 

N 1 A 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Amphigenia, Iphigenia,f Tritogenia, Lasthenia. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Albania, Sicania, Hyrcania, Arcania, Lucania, Dania, Co- 
dania, Dardania, Epiphania, Alania, Mania, Carmania^ Gcr- 

* See Role 30. t See this word in the IJt}<ia^|^0«aMary, 

• I 2 



( 116 ) 

maiiiay Normania^ Cinnania, Acasniuiiay Campa^, Hispania, 
Pomeraniay Afrania, Uraaia, Bassania^ Actania, Edetania^ Lale- 
taiiia, Occitania, Ossigitaiiia, Mauritauia, Lusitaoia, Tittmia, 
Sexitaoia, Alentaniay Contestania, Mevania, Lithuania, Trail- 
silvania, Azania, iEnia, Actaenia, Aberdenia, Ischenia, Tyrrhe- 
nian Parthenia, Diogenia, Menia, Achaemeniay Armenia, Nenia,. 
Noenia, Poenia, Cebrenia, Senia, Amagnia, Signia, Albinia, 
Lacinia, Dinia, Sardinia, Fulginia, Virginia, Bechinia, M ach- 
linia, Ciminia, Rleusinia, Tinia, Lavinia, Mervinia, Lamnia^ 
Lycenmia, Polyhymnia, Alemannia, Britannia, Fescennia, Aonia, 
Lycamia, Chamia, Catalonia, Laconia, Glasconia, Adonia^ 
Macedonia, Marcedonia, Caledonia, Mygdonia, Aidonia, Asi- 
donia, Posidonia, Abbendonia, Herdonia, Laudonia, Cydonia^ 
Masonia, Paeonia, Pelagonia, Paphlagonia, Ar^onia, Anti- 
gonia, Sitjbonia, Ionia, Agrionia, Avalonia, Aquilonia, Apollo-* 
Ilia, Colonia, Polorria, Populonia, Vetulonia, Babylonia, Ac« 
hionia, iEmonia, Haemonia, Tremonia, Ammonia, Harmonia, 
Codaiionia, Sinonia, Pannonia, Bononia, Lampouia, Pompo- 
nia, Cronia, Feronia, Sbphronia, Petronia, Antrouia, Duronia, 
Turonia, Csesonia, Ausonia, Latonia, Tritonia, Boltonia, Ulto- 
hia, Hantonia, Vintonia, Wintonia, Bistonia, Plutonia, Favonia, 
Sclavonia, Livonia, Arvonia, Saxonia, Exonia, Sicyonia, Nar- 
iiia, Samia, Dorebemia, Hibemia, Clitemia, lindisfornia, Vi- 
gomia, Wigomia, Libumia, Calphurnia, Satumia, Pomia, ]3au- 
nia, Ceraunia, Acroceraunia, Junisi, Clunia, Neptunia, Ercynia, 
Bithynia, Macrynia. ' 
< O I A 

Accent the Antepenultimate 
Latiila. 

PI A 

Accent ^the Antepenultimate. 

Apia, Salopia, M anapia, Messapia, Asdipia, X<ampia, Olym* 
pia, Ellopia, Dolopia, CEnopia, Cecropia, Moptoopia, Appia, 
Lappia, Oppia> Luppia, Antuerpia. 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Daria. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Aria, Baria, Fabaria, Columbaria, Barbaria, Caria^ Ficaria, 



( 117 ) 

Calcaria^ Sagaria^ M^ria, Hungarian Pharia, Salaria, Hilarja, 
Allaria, Mallaria, Sigillaria, Angiiillaria, Samaria,* Palmaria, 
Flanaria, l^Daria, Maenaria, Gallinaria, Aainaria, Carbonaria, 
Chaunaria, ColutM^ria, Agraria, Diocaesaria, Pandataria, Cota- 
ria, Nivaria, Antiquaria, Cervaria, Petuaria, Argentuaria, Cala* 
bria, Cantabria, Cambria, Sicambria, Fimbria, Mesembria, 
Umbria, Cumbria, Selymbria,. Abobria, Amagetobria, Trina- 
cria, Teucria, Molycria, Adria, Hadria, Geldria, Andria, Sca- 
mandria, Aaandria, Cassandna, Alexandria, ^ria, Egeria, Ae- 
ria, Faberia, Iberia, Celtiberia, Luceria, Nuceria, ^geri^, 
iEtheria, Elutheria, Pieria, Aleria, Valeria, Amelia, iNumeria, 
Neria, Casperia, Cesperia, Hesperia, Hyperia, Seria, Fabrateria, 
Compulteria, Asteria, Anthesteria, Faveria, Lhoegria, Iria, 
Liria, Equiria, Oschoforia,. Daphnephoria, Themophria, An- 
thesphoria, Chilmoria, Westmoria, Eupatoria, Anactoria, Vic- 
toria, Praetoria, Ania, Atria, Eretria, Feltria, Conventria, Bodo- 
tria,'CEnotria, C^stria, Cicestria, Circestria, Thalestria, Istria, 
Austria, Industria, Tublusbia, Uria, Calaufia, Isauria, Curia, 
Duria, Manduria, Furia, /Liguria, Remuria, Erruria, Hetruria, 
Turia, Apaturia, Boeturia, Beturia, Asturia, Syria, Coelesyria, 
Coelosyria, Leucosyria, Assyria. 

SI. At 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Asia, Chadasia, Lasia, Seplasia, Amasia, Aspasia, Therasia, 
Agirasia, Austrasia, Anastasia, Arbsia, ^sia, Caesia, Maesia, 
^desia, Artemesia, Magnesia, Moesia, Metpesia, Ocresia, Eu- 
pbratesia, Artesia, Suesia, Bisia, Calisia, Provisia, Hortensia, 
Chenobosia, Leucosia, Pandosia, Tlieodosia, Arachosia, Ortho- 
«ia, Rosia, Tliesprosia, Sosia, Lipsia, Nupsia, Persia, Nursia, 
Tolassia, Cephissia, Russia, Blandusia, Clusia, Ampelusia, An- 
themusia^ Acherusia, Perusia, Bysia, Sicysia, Mysia, Dionysia. 

T I A 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Sabatia, Ambatia, Latia, Calatia, Galatia, Collatia, Dalmatm, 

* For the accent of this word and Alexandria, see Rule 30 prefixed to the 
Initial Vocabulaty, 

t The 8 in this termination, when preceded by a vowel, ought always to be 
sounded like zA, as if written Amazhia, Aspazhiaf &c. Asia, Theodoaia, and 
So^ seem to be the only exceptions.— See Principles of English Pronuncia- 
tion, No. 453, prefixed to the Cri^tcoZ Premuncing DictUmtpy of Ike English 
Language, 



( 118 ) 

Sarmatia^ Egnatia, Aratia, Altatia, Actb, Coetii, Rhaetiay 
Anaetia, Vicetia, Peucetia^ Pometiay Anetia; Clampetiay Lu- 
cretia, Cyretia, Setia, Lutetia, Helvetia, Uzetia, Hiiditia,. An* 
gitia, Androlitiay Sulpitiay Naritia> Delgovitia^ Baltia, Bantia, 
Brigantia, Murgantia, Aira^ntia^ Numantia, Apenmtia, Con- 
stantia/' Placentiay Pkentia, Jjucentia, Fidentia^ Digentia^ Mor* 
gentia, Valentia, ' Pollentiay Pqlentia, Terentia, Florentia, Laifr- 
rentia, Consentia^ Potentia^ Faventia, Confluentia^ liquentia, 
Druentia, Quintiay Pootia, Achrerontia, Alisontia, Moguntia, 
Scotia, Boestia, Scaptia, Martin, Tertia; Sebastia, Bubastia, 
Adrastia, Bestia, Modestia, Segestia, Orestia, Cbaristia, Ostia, 
Brattia^ Aciutia, Minutia^ Cossutia, Tutia^ C^pl^^ Naiytb* 

VIA. 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 

Candavia, Blavia, Flavin, Menavia^ Scandinavia^ Asjpm^ 
Moravia, Warsavia, Ocjtavia, Juvavia, £via, Cendevia, Menevia^ 
Suevia, Livia, Trivia, Urbesaivia^ Salvia, Moscpvia^ S^Qil?^ 
Giergovia, Nassovia, CWia* 

X I A 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 
Briikia, Cinxia. 

Y I A 

Accent the Penultimate^ 
Ililhyia,* Orithyia. 

Z I A 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 

3abazia, Alyzia. 

ALA 

Accent the Penultimate, 
Ahaia^ Mjessala. 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 

Abala, Gabala, Castabala, Onobala, Triocala, Crocala, Ab- 
dala, Daedala, ^upephal]^, Abliala, Mioenala, As^hala, Avala. 



* The vowels ia in tbes« words most be prouoDnced distinctly in two 8yllables« 
as if MTitten, lUithre-f ah^ O-^Hth-e^'ah ; the penultiniate syllaUe pronounced a» 
iUie noun eye. 



( M9 ) 

CLA 

Accent other the Penultitnate or JtOepenultimate Syllable. 
Amid*; 

ELA • 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Arbela, (m Persia) Aceh, Adela^ Suadela, Mtmdela^ Phi- 
lomela. Amstda. 

ELA 

Accent the Antepemdtimate. 
Arbela. (in Sicily) 

OLA 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 

Publicola^ Anionicolay Jimonicola^ Neptunicola^ Agricola, 
Baticola^ Leucola, Mo\slj Abrostola^ Scasvola. 

ULA 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 

Abida, Trebula^ Albula^ Carbula^ Callicnby Saticula, Adula, 
Acidula^ iEgida^ Caligula^ Artigula, Longuk^ Ortopula, Me^ 
rula, Caspenilay Asula, iQsuk^ Foesula; Sc^tesaU^rSoepteilsiilfty 
Insula^ Vitula, Vistula. 

YLA 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Idyla, Mas^yla. 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 
Abyla. 

AMA EMA IMA OMA UMA YMA 
Accent the Penultimate, 
Cyuossema^ Arbma^ Narracustoma. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Pandama, Abderama^ Asama^ Uxama, Acema, Obrima, Per- 
rima, Certima, Boreostoixu^ Decuma, Di^fxna, Hyerosolyma, 
iEsyma. . * 



( lao ) 

ANA 
jiccent: the Penultimate. 

Albana^Pajodapa^Trajaiiay Marciana^ Diana, Sagdiaoa, DraiK* 
giana, Margiana, Apooiauay Pomponiaoay Trojana, Copiana, 
Mariana, Drusiana, Susiana, Statiana, Glottiana, Viana, Alana, 
Crococatana, Eblana^ ^lana^) Amboglana, Vindolana, Quercu- 
lana^ Querquetulana, Amana, Almana, Coipana, Miunaoay Bar- 
pana, Olarana, Adranay Messana/ Catana, Accitaiiaj Astigitana^ . 
Zeugitana^ Meduana, Malvana, Cluana, Novana; Equana. 

ANA 
Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Abana, Fricana, Concana, Adana, Cispadana, Sagana, Acha^ 
na, Leuphana, Hygiana, Drepana, B^pana, flcbatana; Catana, 
Sequana, Cyana, Tyana. 

. ' ■ ' JENA 

Accent the Penultimate, 

Labena, Characena, Medena, Fidena, Aufidena, Ageena, 
Comagena, Dolomena, Capepa, Caesena, Messena, Artena. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Phoebigena, Graphigepa, Aciligena, Ignigena, Jimonigena, 
Opigena, Nysigena, Bootigena, Trojugena, ^gosthen^, Alena^ 
Hele^; Pelle^ Pprsejpa, Atena^ Polyxen^, Theoxena. 

*INA 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Arabina, Acina, Cloacinay Tarracina^ Cluacina, Coecina, 
Ricina, Runcina, Cercina, Lucina, Erycina, Acradin^, Achra-i 
jdina, ^gina, Bacbina, Acanthina, Messalina, Catalina, Fascelina, 
Mechiiiia, Tellina, Callina, MeduUina, Cleobulina, Tutulina, 
Caenina, Cenina, Anton^na, Heroina, Apina, Cisalpina, Trans- 
alpina, Agrippina, Abarina, Carina, Larina, Camarina, Sabrina, 
Phalacrina, Acerina. Lerina, Camerina, Terma, Jamphorina, 
Caprina, Myrina, Casina, Felsina, Abusina, Elusina, Atina, 
Catina, M^tba, libitina, M^ritin^, libentina, Adnimentina, 



* Every word of this tennination with the accent on the penultimate syUable 
has the t pronounced as the noun €yf ,— See lciv\t% 1; S; aad 4, prefixed tp tiift 
fnitial Vocabulary, 



( 121 ) 

Ferentlna^ Aventma^ Aruntina, Potina^ Palaestina, Mutinai Fh* 
vina, Levina. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Adna^ Fascellina, Proserpioa^ Asina^ Sarsina. 

ON A 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Abona, Uxacona^ libisoconay Usocona, Saucona, Dadona^ 
Scardona, Adeona, Aufona, Salona, Bellona, Duellonay jSlmo- 
na, Cremona^ Artemona, Salmona, Homona^ Pomona, Flanona, 
^nona, Hippona, Narona, Aserona, Angerona, Verona, Ma- 
trona, JEsona, Latona| Antona, Dertona, Ortona, Cortona, Al-^ 
vona, Axona. , 

UNA ■ • 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 



Ituna. 



Aloa. 



Anchoa. 



OA 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 



IPA OPA UPA. 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Argyripa, Europa, Catadupa. 

ARA 

Accent the Penultimate, 
Abdara. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Abara, Acara, Imacara, Accara, Cadara, Gadara, Abdara, 
Megara, Machara, Imachara, Phalara, Cinara, Cynara, lipara, 
Jjupara, Isara, Patara, Mazara. 

CRA DRA 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
JLepteacra, Cbarddr^, Clepsydra. 



(142) 

ERA 

Accent the Antepenuhimate. 
Abdera, Andera, Cythera, (the island Cerigo, near Crete.) 

Accent the Antepenultimate^ 

libera, Glycera, Acadera, Jadera, Abdera, Andeni; Aliphe-* 
niy Cythera^ (the city of Cyprus) Hiera, Cremera, Cassera. 

G R A 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
' Tam^ray Beregra. » 

HRA 

Accent the Penultimate. 
X^bethra. 

IRA 
Accent the Penultimate. 

Daira^ Thelaira, Stagira, JSgira^ Deianira, Metanira^ Tfa^* 
atira. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Cybira. 

ORA 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Pandora^ Aberdora, Aurora, Vendesora, Windesonu 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Ebora. 

TRA 
Accent the Penultimate. 
Qeopatra. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Excetra, Leucopetra, Triquetra. 

URA ' 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Cabura, Ebura, j^bura, Balbura, Subura, Pandura^ Baniura, 
Asura, Lesura, Isura, Cynosiira, Lactura, Astura, 



( 123 ) 

YRA 

Accent the Penultimafe. 

Ancyra, Cercyra, Corcym, Lagyra, Palmyra,* Ccwyra, 
Xcntynu 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Laphyra, Glaphyra, Philyra, Cebyra, Anticyra. 

ASA 
Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Abasa, Banasa, Dianasa, Harpasa. 

ESA ISA OS A 

. Accent the Penultimate. 

Ortogesa, Aksa, Halesa, Nain^sa, Alpesa, Berresa, Mentesa, 
Ampbisa, Elisa, Tolosa, iElrosa, Dertosa, Cortuosa. 

USA YSA 

Acjcent the Penultimate. 

Phannacusa, Pufaecusa, Nartecusa, Phoenicnsa, Celadusa, 
Padusa, Lopadusa, Medusa, Eleusa, Creusa, Lagusa, Elapfausa, 
Agathusa, Marathusa, ^tbusa, Phoethusa, Arethusa, Ophiusa, 
Elusa, Cordilusa, Drymusa^ Eranusa; Ichnusa, Colpusa, Apni- 
jsa^ Cissusa^ Scotusa^ Dryusa, Donysa. 

ATA 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Braccata, Adadata, Khadata, Tifata, Tipfaata, Crotonionata, 
Alata, Amata, Acmata, Coinata, Sarmata, Napata/ Demarata, 
Quadrata, Orata, Samosata, Armosata, Congavata, Artaxata. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Charestrata.. 

F.TA ITA OTA UTA 

Accent the Penultimate. 

iEta,' Caieta^ Moneta, Demaieta, Myrteta, Herbita, Areopa- 
gita, Meiita, Abderita, Artemita, Stagirita, Uzita, Phthiota, 
Epirota, Contributa, Cicuta, Aluta, Matuta. 



* Pcffnyrtr.— Sec this word in the ItiUUl Vocabukary. 



( 124 ) 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Damocrlta^ Emerita. 

• ''-■' •' AVA EVA IVA 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Clepidava^ Abragava, Calleva, Geneva, Areva, Atteva, La-* 
teva, Galliva. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Batava. 

UA . . 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Accua, Addua, Hedua, Heggua, Armua, Capua, Febraa^ 
Achrua, Palatua, Flatua, Mantua, Agamzua. 

YA 

Accent (he AnlepenulHmtite. 

libya, Zerolibya, ^thya, Carya, Marsya. 

AZA EZA OZA 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Abaraza, Mieza, Baragoza. 

AE 

Accent the Antepenultim^ate. 
|>]^ausecae, Pasiphae. 

BjnE CIEa 
Accent ihe Penultimate. 
Maries. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Colubae, Vaginiaeae, Carmocse, Oxydracse, Gallicae, Hieroni- 
cae, Coricae, Anticae, Odrycae. 

ADiE 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
iEneadae, Bacchiadae, Scepiadae, Battiadae, Thestiadae. 

AD^ UDJE 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Proclidae, Basilidas, Orestidas, j£budas, Ebudae. 



( 125 ) 

jiccent the Ardepenidtimatt. 

Labdacidae, Seleucidae, Adrymachidse, Branchidae, Pyrrhy- 

daB, Basilida^y Romulidas^ Numidae, Pardanidiey Borysthenidae, 

Ausonidae. C^ecropidae, Gaingiaindae. Mari^aridae, Tyndaridas^ 
Druid®. .... .'.^Tp 

ZP ZC 17 IP 17 717 fl 317 U ZP 
JtUlEA jCaImIa rJtU VJiEi JtlxEi 

. . Accent the Pentdtimatel: . 
Achaeas; Plataeae, Napajae, AUifae. u. ' r • \ ^ 

Accent tl^ Antep^tjltimate,, :, ;-, ;» 

Diomedeae^ Cyaneae, Cenchr^a^^ Capreas^ Plateae, Callifae^ 
Latobrigae, Lapithae. 

Accent the Afitepenultimate. 

Baiae, Graiae, Stabias^ Ciliciaey Cerciae, Besidia?,. Rudiae^ 
Taphiae, Versaliae, Ficeliae^ Encheliae, Cloeliae, Cutilia^^ Esqui- 
liae, Exquiliae^ Formiae^ Volcaniae^ Araniae, Annenias, Britan- 
niae, Boconiae, Chelidpniaey Pioniae, Gemoniae, Xyniae, EUopiae, 
HerpiaB, Caspiae^ Cunicularias, Canariae, Purpurariae, Chabriae, 
Feriae, Laboriae, Emporiae, Caucasian, VcspasiaB,-CorasiaB, Pra- 
^iae, Ithacesiae, Gymnesia^^ Etesiae, Gratiae^ Venetiae^ Piguntlae, 
Selinuntiaey Sestiae, Cottiae, Juandaviae^ Harpyiae. 

• LIE MJE 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Piala?, Agagamalae^ Apsilae, Apenninicolae^ ^quicolas, Api- 
olae, Epipolae, Bolbulae, Anculae, Fulfulaey Fesulae, Carsulae, La- 
tulae, Thermopylae^ Acrocomae, Achomae, Solymae. 

ANiE EN^ 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Africanae, Clodianae^ Valentinianae, Marianae, Valentiana, 
Sextianae, Cumanae, Adiabenas^ Mycenae, Fregenae, Sophense, 
Athenae, Hermathenae, Mitylenae, Achmenae^ Acesemen«, Clas- 
someoae, Camoenae, Convenae. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Fauoigenae, Ophiogenae, Apenninigenae. 



* See Ride 4 of the Initial Voeabulary. 



( 126 ) 

INJE ONiE UNiE ZO^ 

Accent the Penultimate* 

Salinae, Calamhiae, Agrippinae^ CariDae, TaurinaSy Philidtiiia&/ 
CteonaP; Vemioiiae^ Oonas, Vacunas^ Androgunae, Abzoae. 

IPiE UPiE 
Accent the Antepenultimate. 
CenturipaBy Rutupae. 

AR^ ERE UBRiE YTHRiE OR^ ATR^ ITR^ 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Adiabarae, Andarse^ Ulubrae, Budoras, Alachorae^ Coatrae, 
Velitrae. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Eleutherae^ Bliterae^ Erythrae, Pylagorae. 

ASiE ESiE US^ 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Sjracusae, Pitheciisae, Pityusae. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Pagasffi, Acesae. 

AT^ ET^ 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Maeatae, Abrincatae, Lubeatae, Docleatae, Pheiieatae, Aca- 
peatae^ Magatae, Olciniatae, Galatae, Arelatae, Hylatae, Arnata?, 
laxamatae, Dalmatae, Sauromatae, Exomatas^ Abrinatae, Fortu*- 
natae, Crotoniatae, Asampatae, Cybiratae, Vasatae, Circetae, 
JBsymnetas, Agapetap, Aretae, Diaparetae. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Thyroagetae, Massagetse^ Aphetae, Deuseletae^ OBletae, D0^ 
metae. 

IT^ OTiE UTiE YTiE 

Accent the Penultimate. 

AscitSB, Abraditae, Achitae, Aboiiiteichitae, Accabacotichitae, 
Arsagalitae, Avalitae, Phaselitae, Brullitae, Hierapolitae, Antoni- 
opolitae^ Adrianapolitae, MetropolitaS; Diotysopolitas^ Adulits^, 



( 127 ) 

Elamitae^ Bomitae, Tomitae, ScenitJe, Pionitae, Agravonlta, 
Agonitae, Sybaritae, Daritae, Ophaiitas, Dassaritas^ Nigritae, 
Orita?, Aloritae, Tentyritae, Graleotas, Limniotae, Estiotae, Am- 
preutae, Alutae^ Troglodytae, or Troglod'ytae. 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Durcabrivae, Elgovae, Durobrovae, 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Mortuae, Halicyae, Phl^yae, Bithyae, Ornithyae, Milya, 
Minyae. 

O B E 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Deiphobe, Niobe. 

ACE ECE ICE OCE YCE 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Phcenice, Berenice, Aglaonice, Stralonice. — See Rule 30. 

Accent the Atiiepenultimate. 

Candace, Phylace, Canace, Mirace, Artace, Allebece, Alo- 
pece, Laodice, Agnadice, Eurydicc, Pyrrhice, Helice, Ghillice^ 
lUice, Demodice, Sarmatice, Erectice, Getice^ Cymodoce, 
Agoce, Harpalyce, Eryce. 

E D E 

Accent the Penultimate* 
Agamede, Perimede, Alcimede. 

M E 
Accent the Penultimate. 
JEaee. 

NEE AGE 
Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Cyanee^ Lalage. 



< w 



•*-*- 



« The t^raiiniition of ymf with the accent on the preceding syllable, must be 
pronoonced •• two timilar letton; timt ik fti if melt ffaHc^-ef Mm-M-t, &c.^ 
See Rule 4 of te JMkl FMofrvkry. 



( 128 ) 

ACHE ICHE YCHE 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Ischomache, Andromache^ Canache, Doliche, Eatyche. 

PHE THE 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Anaphe^ Psamathe* 

I E 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Gargaphie,* Uranie^ Meminie, Asterie, Hyrie, Parrhasie, 
Clyde. 

ALE ELE ILE OLE ULE YLE 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Neobule, Eubule, Cherduley Eriphyle. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Acale, Hecale, Mycale, Megale, Omphale^ ^thale, Noven- 
diale^ -SEgialc, Anchiale^ Ambarvale, Myrtale, Hyale, Euryale, 
Cybele, Nephele, Alele, Semele^ Perimele, Poecile, Affile, 
OSmphile, lole, Omole, Homole, Phydile, Strongyle^ Chthd- 
nophyle, Deipyle, Eurypile. 

AME IME OME YME 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Apame^ Inarime^ Ithome^ Amymome, QSnome, Amphinome, 
Laonome^ Hylonome, Eurynomey Didyme. 

A N E 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Mandane^ jEane^ Anthanei Achriane^ Anane, Drepane^ Acra* 
batane^ Eutane^ Roxane, 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Taprobane, Cyane, Pitane. 



* The t in the penoltimate syllables of &e words, not havmg the accent, taxAt 
be pronounced like e. This occasions a disagreeable hiatus between this and 
-the last syllable, and a repetition of the same sound ; but at the same time 
is strictly according to mla.— See Rule 4 of the ZiiiKal KMoMory. 



. ( 149 .) 

ENE 

Accent the Penidtimate. 

Acabene^ Bubacene, Damascene^ Chalcidene, Cisthene, 
Alcisthene, Parthiejoey Priene, Poroaelene, Pallene, Tellene, 
Cyllene^ Pylene^ * Mitylene^ ^mene, LaonomeneA I^mene, 
Dindymene, Osrhoene^ Tro'ene, Arene, Autocrene, Hippo- 
crene, Pirene, Cyrene, Pyrene, Capissene, Atropatene, Cor- 
duene, Syene. 

Accent the AntepeHultimate. 

Helene^ Depamene, Dynamene, Nyctimene^ Idomene, Mel* 
pomene^ Anadyomene, Armene. 

I N E 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Sabine, Csurcme, Trachine, Alcanthiae, Neptum^e, Larine^ 
Nerine, Irine^ Barsine^ Bolbetine.' 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Asine. 

ONE YNE 
Accent the Penultimate. 

Methone, Ithone, Dione, Porphyrioue, Acrisione, Alone, 
Halone, Corone, Torone, Thyone, Bizone, Delphyne. 

Accent the Aniepemdtimate. 

Mycone, Erigone, Persephone, Tisiphone, Deione, Pleione, 
Chione, Uione, Hennione, Herione, Commone, Menemosyne, 
Sophrosyne, Euphrosyne. 

O E (in two syllables.) 

Accent the AntepentUthnatei, 

Amphirhoe, Alcathoe, Alcithoe, Amphithoe, Nausithoe, Lao* 
thoe, Leucothoe, Cymothoe, Hippothoe, Alyxothoe, Myrioe, 
Pholoe, Soloe, Sinoe, -Enoe, Arsinoe, Lysinoe, Antinoe, Lou- 
conoe, Theonoe, Philonoe, Phaemonoe, Autonoe, Polynoe, 
Ocyroe, Beroe, Meroe, Peroe, Abzoe. 

APE OPE 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
lotape, Rhodope, Chalciope, Candiope^ ^thiop^^ Calliope, 



( 130 ) 

liriope, Cassiope, Alope, Agalope, Penelope, Partlienope^ 
Sinope, -SErope, Merope, Dryope. 

ARE IRE ORE YRE 

Accent the Penultimate, 
• Lymire. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Becare, Tamare, ^nare, Terpsichore, Zephyre, Apyre. 

E S E 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 
Melese, Temese. 

ATE ETE ITE OTE YTE TYE 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Ate, Reate, Teate, Arelate, Admete, Arete, Aphrodite, Am- 
phitrite, Atabyrite, Percote, Pactye. 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 

Hecate, Condate, Automate, Taygete, Nepete, Anaxarete, 
Hippolyte. 

AVE EVE 

Accent the Penultimate, 



Agave. 
Nineve. 



Acholai. 



Danai. 



Accent the Antepenultimate. • 

LAI* NAI (in two syllables.) 
Accent the Penultimate, 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 



B I 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Acibi, Abnobi, Attubi. 

A C I 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Segoutiaci, Mattiaci, Amaci, ^naci, Bettovaci. 



For the fiual i in tlies« words, sec Rule the 4th of the Initiia V$cai[mlanf. 



( 131 .) 

ACI ICI OCl UCI 

Accent thi Penultimate. 

Rauraci^ Albici^ Labici^ Acedici, Palici^ Marici, Medoma- 
trici, Raurici, Arevici, Triboci, Aruci. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Callaici^ Vendelici, Academici, Arecomici, Heniici, Gynici, 
Staici^ Opici, Nassici, Aduatici^ Atuatici, Peripatetici, Cettici, 
Avantici^ Xystici, Lavici, Triboci, Amadoci, Bibroci 

ODI YDI 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Borgodi, AbydL 

^ I 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Sabaei, Vaccaei, and so of all words which have a diphthong 
in the penultimate syllable. 

£ I (in two syllables.) 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Lapidei, Candei, Agandei, Amathei, Elei, Canthlei, Euganei, 
CEnei, Mandarei, Hyperborei, Carastasei, Pratei. 

G I 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Acridophagi, Agriophagi, ,Chelanophagi, Andropophagi, 
Anthropophagi, Lotophagi, Strutophagi, Ichdiyophagi, Decem- 
pagi, Novempagi, Ardgi, Alostigi. 

CHI THI 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Heniochi, ^nochi, Henochi, Ostrogothi. 

*I I 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 
Abii, Gabii^ and all words of this termination. 



• See Rule 3 and 4 of liie Iwiixil VocubtOarif. 

K2- 



( m ) 

ALI EU ILI OLI ULI YU 

Accaii the. Antepenultimate. 

. Abaliy Vandaliy Acephali, Cynocephali, Macroceplmliy At- 
tali, Alontegeceli, Garoceli, MoDOsceti, Igilgili, jEquicoli, 
Carseoli, Puteoli, Corioli, Ozoli, Atabuli, Graeculi, Pediculi, 
Siculi, Puticuli, Anculi, Barduli, Varduli, Turduli, Foruli, 
Gsetuli^ Bastuli, Rutuli, Massesyli, Dactyli. 

, AMI EMI . 

Jccent the Penultimate. 

Apbami, Charidemi. 

OMI UMI 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 

Cephalotomi^ Astomi, MedioxumL 

A N I 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Albani, Cerbani, ^caui, Sicani, Tusicani, Sec. and all words 
of this termination, except Choani and Sequani, or such as are 
derived from words terminating in amjus^ with the penultimate 
short; which see. 

E N I 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Agabeni, Adiabeni, Sarceni, Iceni, Laodiceni, Cyziceni, 
Uceni, Chaldeni, Abydeni, Comageni, Igeni, Quingeni^ Ce- 
pheni, Tyrrheni^ Rutheni, Labieni, Allieni, Cileni, Cicimeni, 
Alapeni, Hypopeni, Tibareni, Agareni, Rufreni, Caraseni^ 
Volseni, Bateni, Cordueni. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Origeni, Apardieni, Antixeni. 

INI* 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Gabini, Sabini, Dulgibini, Basterbini, Peucini, Marrucini, 



* When the accent is on the penultimate syllable, the i m the two last sylla- 
bles is pronounced exactly like the noun e\fe\ but when the accent is on the 
antepenultimate, the first % is pronounced hke e, and the last like ^yf.-^SeQ 
Rule :i and 4 of the Miioi Vocabulary. 



:•* 



( 1^ ) 

Lactttcini^ Otadini^ Bidioi, Udini, Caudini, Budhu^ BlK^ni^ 
Triocalini, Triumpilini, Magelliiii, Entellini, Caotni^ Mona- 
nini, Anagnini^ Amiternini, Satuniini^ Centuripini, Paropini, 
Irpini^ Hirpini, Tibarini, Carini, Cetarini, Citarini, Illiberini, 
Acheriniy Elorini, Assoriniy Peltrini, Sutrini, Eburini, Tigurini, 
Cacyrini, Agyrini, Halesini, Otesini, Mosini^ Abi§sini^ Mos- 
sini, Clusini, Arusini, Reatini^ Latim^ Calatini. Collatim, Ca- 
lactini, Ectini, ^getinL Ergetmi, Jetini, Aletini, Spoletini^ 
Netini, Neretini, Setiiri, Bantmi, Murgantini, Pallantini, Aman- 
tini, Numantini, Fidentiili, Salentim^ ColeBtini, Carentmi, Ve- 
rentiniy Florentani, Consentini^ PotentiQiy Faventini, Leontiniy 
Acherontini, Saguntini^ Haluntini, ^gyptmi, Maraertini, Tri- 
castini, Vestiiii^ Fausf^i^ Abrettmi, Enguiai^ Inguini^ Lanu- 
vini. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Lactucini^ Gemini, Meinini, Morim,* 'Torrini. 

ONI UNI YNL 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Edoniy Aloniy Nemaloni, Cheloni, Aqueloni, Abroni^ Gor- 
duni, Mariandjni, Magyfii, Mo^yni. 

Accent the AntepemAtimate. 
Epigoniy Theutoni. 

U P I 
Accent the Penultimate. 

Catadupi. ' / 

ARI ERI IRI OR^ URI VRI 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Babariy Chomari, Agactari^ Ibeii, Celtiberi, Doberi, Algeria 
Palemeriy Monomeri, Hermanduri^ Dioscuri^ Banceri^ Paesuri. 
Agacturi, Zimyri. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Abari, Tochari, Acestari, Cavari, Calabri^ Cantabri, Digeri, 

* Extremique hoBiiBum Morini, Rhenosque bicornifli. 

VittG. iE». vii. 727-. 
The Danes, imconqtter'd offiqprmg^ Qiaircfa bdiind; 
And Morinif the last of hunuun kind. 

; J>ItYDEN. 



( 134 ) 

I 

Drugeri, Eleutheri, Crustumeri^ Teneteri, Brueteri, Suelteri, 
Trevcri, Veragri, Treviri, Ephori, Pastophori. 

USI YSI 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Hermandusi^ Condrusi^ Nerusi, Megabysi. 

ATI ETI OTI UTI 

Accent the Pentdtimate. 

Abodati^ Capellati^ Ceroti, Thesproti^ Carnuti, 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Athanatiy Heneti, Veneti. 

AVI EVI IVI AXI UZI 

Accent the Penulti;nate. 

Andecavi, Chamavi^ Batavi^ Pictavi, Suevi, Argivi, Achivi, 
Coraxiy Abruzi. 

U I 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Abascuu ^dui^ Hedui^ Vermanduiy Bip^mui^ Inui, Cas- 
truminui^ Essui^ Abrincatui. 

IBAL UBAL NAL QUIL 
Accent the Penultimate. 
Pomonal. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Annibaly Hannibal, Asdrubal, Hasdrubal. 

AM IM UM 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Adulam, ^gipam, Aduram, Gerabum. 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 
Abarim. 

UBUM ACUM ICUM OCUM 
Accent the Penultimate. 

Coimicum, Tomacum, Baracum, Camericunij Labicum^ 



( 135 ) 

Avaricum, Antricum, Trivicum, Nordovicum, Longovicum, 
Veroviciun, 'Norvicum, Brimdsvicum. 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 

Caecubum, Abodiacum, Tolpiacum, Bedriacum, Gessoria- 
cum, Magoiitiacum, Mattiacum, Argentomachum, Olenacum^ 
Areiiacum, Bremetonacum, Eboracum, Eburacum, Lampsa- 
cuixi, Nemetacum, Bellovacum^ Agedicum, Agendicum, Gly- 
conicum, Canopicum^ Noricum, Massicum^ Adriaticum, Sa- 
benneticum^ Balticum^ Aventicum, Mareoticum, Agelocum. 

EDUM IDUM 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Manduessedum^ Algidum. 

^ U M 

f ■ 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Lilybaeum^ Lycaeum^ and all words of this termination. 

E U M 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Syllaceum^ Lyceum, Sygeum, Amatheum^ Glytheum, toidy- 
meum, Prytaneum, Palanteum. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Herculeum, Heracleum, Rataneiun, Corineum, Aquineum, 
Dictynneum^ Pantic^peum, Rhceteuni. 

AGUM IGUM OGUM 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Nivoraagum, Noviomj^m, Adrobigum, Dariorigum, AIUk • 
brogum. 

I U M 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Albium, Eugiibium^ Abrucium, and all words of this termin- 
ation. 

• ■ 

ALUM ELUM ILUM OLUM ULUM 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Anchialum, Aceliun^ Ocelum^ Corbilum, Clusiolum, Oracu- 



( 33(7 ) 

hm, Janksulum, Corniculum^ H^cultimy Uttricutuihy Ascuf? 
Avon, Tusculum^ Angulum, Cii^iim^ Apahnn, Trossuium, 
Batulum. 

MUM 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Amstelodamum^ Novocomum^ Cadomum, Amstelrodamum. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Lygdamuniy Cisamiim^ Boiemum, Antrimum, Auximum, 
Bergomum, Mentonomum. 

■ ■ A N U M 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Albanum, Halicanum, Arcanum, ^anum, Teanum, Trifa- 
num, Stabeanum, Ambianum, Pompeknum, Tullianum, For- 
mianum, Cosmianum^ Boianum, Appianum, Bovianum, Me- 
diolanum, Amanum, Aquisgranum', Trigisanum, Nuditanum, 
Usalitanimi, Ucalitanum, Acoletanum, Acharitanum^ Abzirir 
tanum, Argentanum^ Hortanum, Anxauum. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Apuscidanum^ Hebromanum, Itanum. 

E N U M 

Accent the Penultimate. 

. Picenum, Calenum, Durolenum^ Misenum^ Volsenum, Darr 
venum. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

, Olenum. 

I N U M 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Urbinum, Sidicinum, Ticimim, Pucinum, Tridimim, Londi- 
num, Aginum, Casilinum, Crustciminuiii, Apemnnum, Sepi- 
num, Arpinum, Araspinum, Sarinuniy Lucrinum, Ocrinum, 
Camerinunii Laborimimy Petrmufli, Taurimim^ Casifium, Ne- 
mosimun^ Cassinum, Atinum, Batinuiii» Ambiatmum, Petinum^ 
Altinum, Salentinum, ToUentmum, Ferentmum, Laurintinupi^ 
Abro&nuD; ingwuim, Aqmnum^ Ne^ukium, 



( 137 ) 

O N U M 

Accent the Penultimate. 

CabillonuiD; Garianonum^ Duronum, Cataractonum. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Ciconum^ Vindonum^ Brkonum. 

UNUM YNUM 

Accent the Penvltimate. 

Segedunum^ Lugdimum, Marigdununiy Moridunum, ArcaU 
dimum^ Rigodunuhi, Sorbiodunum^ Noviodunum^ Meloduuum, 
Camelodunum, Axelodunum^ Uxellodunum^ Brannodunum, 
Carodunum, Caesarodunum^ Tarodunmn, Theodorodunum, Ebu- 
rodunum^ Nemantodunum, Belununiy Antematunum^ Andoma- 
timum, MaryandyDum. 

OUM OPUM YPUM 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Myrtotim^ Eiiropum. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Pansilypum. 

ARUM 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Agarum, Belgarum, Njmpharum^ Convenarum, Rosaram^ 
Adulitarum, Celtarum. 

ABRUM UBRUM 

Accent the Penultimate, 

Velabnim^ Vernodubnim. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Artabruoi. 

BRUM 
Accent the Antepenultimate, 
Caucoliberam, Tuberum. 

AFRUM ATHRUM 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Veoafinim. 



( 138 ) 
% 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Barathrum. 

' I R U M 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Muzirum. 

O R U M 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Cermorum^ Ducrocortonim. 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 
Dorostorum. 

E T R U M 

Accent either the Penultimate or Antepenultimate. 

Celetrum. 

U R U M 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Alaburum^ Ascurum, Lugdurum, Mai codiirum^ Lactodurum^ 
Octodurum^ Divojumm, Silurum^ Saturuni. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Tigurum. 

ISUM OSUM 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Alisum^ Amisum^ Janosum. 

ATUM ETUM ITUM OTUM UTUM 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Atrebatum, Calatum, Argentoratum^ Mutristratum^ Eloce- 
turn, Quercetum, Caletuniy Spoletum, Vallisoletuniy Toletum^ 
Ulmetum, Adrumetum^ Tunetum, Eretum, Accitum, Duro- 
litum, Corstopitum, Abrituniy ^eritum, Augustoritum, Nau- 
fcrotitumy Complutum. . , 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Sabbatum. i 

AVUM IVUM YUM 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Gandaram, Symbrivum. 

1 



( 139 ) 
Accent the Antepenultimate. 

I 

Cocjcyum^ Engyiun. 

MIN AON ICON 

Accent the Penultimate, 

Helicaon^ Lycaon, Machaon^ Dolichaon^ Amithaon^ Didy- 
maon, Hyperaon^ Hicetaon. 

Accent the Antepenidtiniate. 

Salamin^ Rubicon^ Helicon. 

ADON EDON IDON ODON YDON 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Calcedon, Chalcedon, Carchedon^ Anthedon^ Aspledon, 
Sarpedon, Thermodon^ Abydon. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Celadon, Alcimedon, Amphimedon^ Lsmnedon, Hippomedon, 
Oromedon, Antomedon, Armedon, Eurymedon^ Calydon, 
Amydon, Corydon. 

EON EGON 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Pantheon, Deileon, Achilleon, Arbtocreon. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Aleon, Pitholeon, Demoleori, T^moleon, Anacreon, Tuno- 
creon, LJcal^on. 

APHON EPHON IPHON OPHON 

. Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Agalaphon, Chaerephon, , Ctesiphon, Antiphon, Colophon, 
Demophon, Xenophon. 

T H O N 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Agathon, Acroathon, Marathon, Phaeton, Phlegethon, Py- 
nphlt^thoDy Arethon, Acrithon. 



( 140 ) 

ION ^ 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Pandioh, Sandion, Echion, Alphion, Ampliion, Ophion, 
Methion, Arion, Oarkm, ^rion, ^Hyperion^ Orion, Asion, 
Metion, Axion, Ixion. 

Accent the Antepenujttiniate. 

Albion, Phocion, Cephaledion, JSgion, Brigion, Brygion, 
Adobogion, Moschion, Emathion, Amethion, Anthion, Ero- 
thion, Pythion, Deucalion, Dasdalion, Sigalion, Calathion, 
Ethalibn, Ereuthalion, Pigmalipn, Pygmalion, Cemelion, Pe- 
lion, Ptelion, Ilion, Bryllion, Cromion, Endymign, Milanion, 
Athenion^ Boion, Apion, Dropion, A^^ion, Noacopion, Ase- 
lelarion, Acrion, Chimerion, Hyperion, Asterion, Dorion, 
Euphorion, Porphyrion, TTiyrion, Jasion, iEsion, Hippocra- 
tion, Stration, Action, jSBIioii, Metion, .£antidn, Pi^i^tion, 
Dotion, Theodotion, Erotion, Sotioii^, Nophestion, I^ilisfeion^ 
Polytion, Oraytion, Eurytion, Dionizion. 

LON MON OON PON RON PHRON 
Accent the Penultimate. 
Philemon, Criumelopon, Caberon, Dioscoroii, Cac^ron. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Ascalon, Abylon, Babylon, Telamon, Ademon, ^gemon, 
Polemon, Ardemon, Hieroninemt)n, Artemon, Abarimon, 
Oromenon, Alcamenon, Tanromenon, Deicooon, Democoon, 
Laocoon, Hippocoon, Demophoon, Hippothoon, Acaron, Ac- 
carpn, Paparon, Acheron, Apteron, Dsiptoron, Chersephron^ 
AlcipbroD, Lycophron, Euthyphron. 

30N TON YON ZON 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Theogiton, Arilsto^ton, Polygiton, Deltoton. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Themison, Abaton, Aciton, Aduliton, Sicyon, Cercyon, 
iEgyon, Gremmyon, Cromyon, Geryon, Alcetryon, Amphitryon, 
Amphictyon, Acazon, Amazon, Ofizon, Amyzon. 

ABO AGO ICO EDO IDO 

Accent th^ Penultimate, 
Lampedo, Gupido. 



( 141 ) 

t 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Arabo, Tarraco, Slilico, Macedo. 

BEO LEO TEO 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

LabeO; Aculeo, Buteo. ^ 

AGO IGO UGO 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Carthago, Origo, Verrugo, 

PHO THO 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Clitipfao, Agatho. 

BIO CIO DIO GIO LIO MIO NIO RIO SIO TIC VIO 

Aecent the Antepenultimate. 

Arabio, Corbio, Navilubio, Senecio, Diomedio, Regio, 
Phrygio, Bambalio, Ballio, Caballio, Ansellio, Pollio, Sirmioy 
Formio, Phormio, Anio, Parmenio, Avenio, Glabrio, Acrio, 
Curio, Syllaturio, Occasio, Vario, Aurasio, Secusio, Verclusio, 
Natio, Ultio, Derventio, Versontio^ Divio, Oblivio, Petavio, 
Alexio. 

CLO ILO ULO UMO 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Cbaricio, Corbilo, Corbido, iSpuIo^ Bstulo, Castulo, Anu-r 
mo, Luciuno. 

ANO ENO INO 

Accent the Penultimate. ' 
Theano, Adramitteno. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
BarciQO, Ruscino, Fruscino. 

APO IPO 

Accent the Antepenultimate* 
Sisapo, Olyssipo. 



( 1« ) 

ARO ERO 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Vadavero. 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 
Bessaro^ Civaro, Tubero, Cicero, Hiero, Acimero, Cessero, 

ASO ISO 

Accent the Penultimate, 

Carcaso, Agaso, Turiaso, Aliso, Natiso. 

ATO ETO ITO YO XO 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Enyo, Polyxo. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Erato, Derceto, Siccilissito, Capito, Amphitryo. 

BER FER GER TER VER 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Meleager, Elaver. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Calaber, Mulciber, Noctifer, Tanager, Antipater, Marspater, 
Diespiter, Marspiter, Jupiter. ^ 

AOR NOR POR TOR ZOR 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Chrysaor, Alcanor, Bianor, Euphranor, Alcenor, Agenor, 
Agapaenor, Elpenor, Rhetenor, Antenor, Anaxenor, Vindemiator, 
Rhobetor, Aphetor. 

Accent the Antepenultimate » 

Marsipor, Lucipor, Numitor, Albumazor, or Albumazar. . 

BAS DAS EAS GAS PHAS 

Accent the Pemdtimxite. 

Alebas, Augeas, (king of Elis) iEoeas, Oreas, Symplegas. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Dotadas, Cercidas, Lucidas, Tlmaichidas, Charmidas, . Aki- 



( 143 ) 

damidas, Leonidas^ AristohidaSy Mnai^ppidas, Pelopidas^ Th^- 
aridas^ Diagoridas^ Diphoridas, ADtipatridas, Abantidas^ Suidaa, 
~ CrauxidaSy Ardeas, Augeas^ (the poet) Eleas, Cineas^ Cyneas^ 
Boreas^ Broteas^ Acrapas, Periphas, Acyphas. 

IAS 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Ophias. 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 

Caecias, Nicias, Cephalaedias, * Phidias, Herodias, Cydias, 
Ephyreas, Minyeias, Pelasgias, ' • Antibacchias, Acrolochia?, 
Archias, Adarchias, Arcathias, Agathias, Pythias, Pleias, Pe- 
lias, lUas, Damias, Soemias, Arsanias, Pausanias^ Olympias, 
Appias, Agrippias, Chabrias, Tiberias, Terias, Lycorias, Peld- 
rias, Demetrias, Dioscurias, Agasias, Phasias, Acesias, Agesias, ' 
Hegesias, Tiresias, Ctesias, Cephisias, Pausias, Prusias, Ly- 
sias, Tysias, JEetias, Bitias, Critias, Abantias, Thoantias, Phae- 
thontias, Phaestias, Thestias, Pboestias, Sestias, Livias, Artaxias, 
Loxias. 

LAS MAS NAS 
Accent the Penultimate, 

Acilas, AdulaS; Maecenas, Mcecenas, (or, as Labbe says it 
ought to be written, Mecoenas) Fidenas, Arpinas, Larmas, Atinas, 
Adunas. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Amidas, Amyclas, Agelas, Apilas, Arcesilas, Acylas, Dory- 
las, Asylas, Acamas, Alcidamas, Iphidamas, Chersidamas, 
Praxidanias, Theodamas, Cleodamas, Therodamas, Thyodamas, 
Astydamas, Athamas, Garamas, Dicomas, Sarsinas, Sassiuas, 
Pitinas. 

OAS PAS RAS SAS TAS XAS YAS 
Accent the Penultimate, 

Bagoas, Canopas, Abradaras, Zonaras, (as Labbe contends it 
ought to be) Epitheras, Abradatas, Jetas, Philetas, Damoetas, 
Acritas, Eurotas, Abraxas. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Teleobas, Chrysorrhoas, Agriopas, Triopas, Zonaras, Gya- 
ras, Chrysoceras, Mazeras, Chaboras, Orthagoras, Pythagoras, 
Diagoras, {^lagoras^ Demagoras, Timagoras, Hermagoras,- 



( 144 ) 

Athenagoras, Xenagoras, Hippagoras^ Stesagoras^ Tkagonw^ 
Telestagc^ras^ Protagoras, Eva^ras, Anaxagoras, Praxagoras^ 
Ligoras, A^yras, TliiMnyras, Cinyras, Atyfas, Apesas, Pietas^ 
Felicitas, Liberalitas, Lentulitas, Agnitas, Opportimitas, Clari<- 
tas, Veritas, Faustitas, Civitas, Archytas, Phl^yas, Milya^ 
Marsyas. 

BBS 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Chalybes^ Armenochalybes. 

C E S 
Accent the Penultimate. 

Arbaces> Pbamaces, Samothraces, Arsaces, Phoenices, liby- 

eenicesy Olympionices^ Plistonices, Polynices, Ordovices, 
movices, Eburovices. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Axiaces, Astaces, Derbices, Ardices, Eleutherocilices, Cap- 
padoces, Eudoces, Bebryces, Mazyces. 

A D E S 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Icades, Olcades, Arcades, Orcades, Cameades, Gorgades, 
Stoechades, Lichades, Strophades, Laiades, Naiades, Alcibiades,. 
Pleiades, Branchiades, Deliades, Heliades, Peliades, Oiliades, 
Naupiiades, Juliades, Memniiades, Cleniades, Xeniades, Hun- 
niades, Heliconiades, Acrisioniades, Teiamoniades, Limoniades^ 
Acheloiades, Asclepiades, Asopjades, Crotopiades, Appiades, 
Thespiades, Thariades, Otriades, Cyriades, Scyriades, Anchisi- 
ades, Dosiades, Lysiades, , Nysiades, Dionysiades, Menoedades, 
Miltiades, Abantiades, Dryantiades, Attantiades, Laomedonti- 
ades, Phaetontiades, Laertiades, Hephaestiades, Thestiades, Bat- 
tiades, Cyclades, Pylades, Demades, Nomades, Maenades, 
Echinades, Cispades, Cbcerades, Sporades, Perisades, Hip- 
potades, Sotades, Hyades^ Tbyades^ Dryades^ Hamadryades, 
Othryades. 

E D E S 

Accent the Penuitimate. 

Democedes, Agamedes, Palamedes, Archimedes, Nicomedds, 
Diomedes, Lycomedes^ Cleomedes^ Ganymedesy Thrasymedes, 



( 145 ) 

IDES 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Alcides/ Lyncides, Tydides, ^gides, Proihetfiides, Nicar- 
thidesy Heraclides^ TeleclideSy Epiclides, Andclides, AndrO'^ 
elides, Meneclides, tEclides, Cteseclides, Xenoclides, Chan- 
elides, Patroclides, Aristoclides, Euclides, Euryclides, Belides^ 
(singular), Basilides, Nelides, Pelides, ^sclr^lides) Snides, 
Antigenides, CEnides, Lychnides, Amanoidet^y Japeronides, 
larides, Abderides, Atrides, Thesides, Aristides. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Epichaides, Danaides, Lesbides, Labdacides, .Xacides, Hyla- 
eides, Phylacides, Pharacides, Imbracides, Myrmecides, Phoe- 
nicides, Antalcides,- Ljucides, Andocides, Auipycides, Thucy- 
dides, Lelegeides, Tyrrheides, Pimpleides, Clymeneides, Mi- 
neides, Scyreides, Minyeides, Lagides, Harpagides, Lycur- 
gides, Ogygides,, Inachides, Lysimachides, Agatharchides, Ti- 
marchides, Leulychides, Leontychides, Leotychides, Sisyphides, 
Erecthides, Promethides, Crcthides, Scylliides, CEbalides, 
jEAalides, Tantalides, Castalides, Mystalides, Phytalides, Te- 
leclides, Meneclides, CEiclides, Ctesiclides, Androclides, Eu- 
clides, Euryclides, Belides (plural), Sicelides, fipimelides, 
Cypselides, Anaxilides, -Slolides, Eubulides, Phocylides, Pria- 
mides, Potamides, Cuemides, ^Esimides, Tolmides, Chaimides, 
Dardanides, Oceanides, Amanides, Titanides, Olenides, Achae- 
, menides, Achimenides, Epiiuenides, Parmenides, Ismenides, 
Eumenides, Sithnides, Apollinides, Prumnides, Aonides, J)o- 
donides, Mygdalonidef;,' Calydonides, Moeonides, OEdipodioni- 
xles, Deionides, Chionide?, Echionides, Sperchionides, Ophioni- 
des, Japetionides, Ixiouides. Mimallonides, Philonides, ApoUo- 
nides, Acmonides, ^oionides, Polyperaonides, Simonides, Har- 
moiiides, Memnonides, Crouides, Myronides, jSilsonides, Aris- 
tonides, Praxonides, Liburnides, Siioides, Teltbiiides, Pantfaoi- 
des, Achelbides, Proiiopides, Lapides, Callipides, Euripides, Dri- 
opides, CEnopidcfi, Cecropides, Leucippides, Philippides, Ar- 
gyraspides, Clearides, Tainarides, Hebrides, Timaiidrides, Au- 
axandrides, Epicerides, Pierides, Hesperides, Hyperides, Cassi- 
tciides, Anterides^, Peristerides, Libethrides, DioscoiiJes, Pro- 
togorides, Methorides, Antenorides, Actorides, Diactorides, 
Polyctoriides, Hegetorides, Onetoridcs, Antorides, Acestorides, 
Tliesjtorides, Aristorrdcs, Electrides, (Ennotiides, Smindyrides^ 
Philyrides, Pegasides, lasides, Imbrasides, Clesides^ Dionv- 

h 



( 146 ) 

sides, Cratides, Propoetides, Proetides, Oceanrtides, .Eantides, 
Dryantides, Diacontides, Absyrtides, Acestides, Orestides, 
Epytides. 

ODES UDES YDES 

Accent the Penultimate. 

^gilodes, Acmodes, Nebrodes, Herodes, Orodes, Haebudetj, 
Hanides, Lacydes, Pherecydes, Androcydes. 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 

Sciapodes, CEdipodes, Antipodes, Hippopodes, Himanto- 
podes, Pyrodes, Epicydes.. 

AGES EGES IGES OGFS YGES. 

Accent the, Antepenultimate. 

TheageS) Tectosages, Astyages, Leleges, Nitiobriges, Duro* 
triges, Catiiriges, Allobroges, Antobroges, Og}'ges, Cata- 
phryges, Sazyges. 

ATHES ETHES YTHES lES 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Ariarathes, Alethes. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Onythes, Aries. 

ALES 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Novendiales, Geniales, Compitales, Arvales. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Carales. 

AC LES ICLES OCLES 

Accent the Antepenultimate. ' 

Daicles, Mnasicles, Tphicles, Zanthicles, Charicles, Thericles, 
Pericles, Agiasicles, Pasicles, Phrasicles, Ctesicies, . Sosicles, 
Nausicles, Xanticles, Niocles, Empedocles, Theocles, Neocles, 
Eteocles, Sophocles, Pythocles, Diocks, Philocles, Damocles, 
Democles, Phanocles, Xenocles, Hierocles, Androcles, Man- 
drocles, Patrodes, Metrocles, Lamprocles, Cephisocles, Nes- 
toclea, Themistocles. 



( H7 ) 

ELES ILES OLES ULES. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Ararauceles, Hedymeles, Pasiteles, Praxiteles, Pyrgoteles, 
Demoteles, Aristoteles, Gundiles, Absiles, Novensiles, fisa- 
tiles, Taxiles, jEoles, Autololes, Abdimoiioples, Hercules. 

AMES OMES, 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
' Priames, Datames, Abrocomes. 

A N E S 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Jordanes, Athamanes, Alanianes, Brachmanes, Acamanes, 
^gipanes, Tigranes, Actisanes, Titanes, Ariobarzanes, 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Diaphanes. Epiphanes, Periphanes, Praxiphanes, Dexiphanes, 
Lexiphanes, Antiphanes, Nicophfmes, Theophanes, Diophanes, 
ApoUophanes, Xenophanes, Aristophanes, Agrianes, Pharas- 
manes, Prytanes. 

E N E S* 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Timagenes, Metagenes, Sosigenes, Epigenes, Melesigenes, 
Antigenes, Theogenes, Diogenes, Oblogenes, Hermogenes, . 
Rhetogenes, Themistogenes, Zanthenes, Agasthenes, Lasthenes, 
Clisthenes, Callisthenes, Peristhenes, Cratisthenes, Antisthenes, 
Barbostheiies, Leosthenes, Demosthenes, Dinosthenes, Andros- 
thenes, Posthenes, Eratosthenes, Borysthenes, Alcamenes, The- 
ramenes, Tisamenes, Deditamenes, Spitamenes, Pylemenes, 
Althemenes, Achaemenes, Philopcjemenes, Ds^imenes, Nausi- 
menes, Numenes, Antimenes, Anaximenes, Cleomenes, Hippo- 
menes, Heromenes, Ariotopienes, Eumenes, Nmnenes, Poly- 
menes, Geryenes. 

I N E S, 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Telchines, Acesines. 

■ ■• ... I .. .11 I ■ I, .. >!■■ , , 

* All the words of this termination have the accent on the Antepennltimate, 
See Eumene$ in the Initial Vocabvlarv, 

t 2 



( 148 ) 

Accent the Antepemiltiniate. 
Aborigines^ iEschines*, Asines. 

ONES 

Accent the Penultimate. 

CaluconeSy Agones, Autechthones, lones, Heileviones, Vo- 
loneS| Nasimones, Verones, Centrones^ Eburones, Grisones, 
Auticatones, St^^es, Vectones, Vetones, Acitavones, Ingoe- 
vones^ Istaevone, Axones, iExones, Halizon^. 

Accent the Antepenultimate* 

LycaoneS; Chaones, Frisiabones, Cicones, Vernicones, 
FranconeSy Vascones, Mysomacedones, Rhedones, Essedones, 
Myimidones, Pocones^ Paphlagones, Aspagones, Lsestr^ones, 
Jingones^ Lestrygones, Vangiones, Nuithones, Sithones^ BttU-' 
ones, HermioneSy Biggeriones, Meiiones, Suiones, MifAaliones, 
SenoneSy Memnones, Pamiones, Ambrones^ Suessones, An- 
80068^ Pictoncs, Teutones, Amazones. 

O E S 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Heroes. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. ^ 

Chorsoes, Chosroes. 

APES OPES 

. Accent t7ie Penultimate. 
Cynapes^ Cecropes, Cyclopes. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Panticapes, Crassipes, Esubopes, JBthiopes^ Hellopes, Do- 
lopes^ Panopes, Sterbpes, Dryopes. 

ARES ERES IRES ORES URES. 

Accent the Penultimate, 

Cabares, Balcares, Apollinares, Saltuares^ Ableres^ Byzeres, 
Bechires, Diores, Azores, Silures. 



* labbe aays, that a certain antholopst, ibrcedby the necessity of bis verse, 
1^1^ pronoauced tb» word With the accent on ^e penoltNate. 



{my 

Accent the^ntepenultimaU. 

Leochares, ^mochares, Demochares, Ablsareg, Cavares, 
Insubres, Luceres, Pieres, Astabores, Musagores, Ccntores, 
Limures. 

I S £ S 

Accent the Penultimate, 



Ancliises. 



^ E N S E S 
Accent the Pemtltimate. 



Ucubenses^ Leonicenses^ and all words of this temiination. 

OCES YSES 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Cambyses. 

A T E S 

Accent the Penultimate, 

Phraates^ Atrebates, Cornacateis, Ceracates, Adunicates, Ni* 
^icates, Barsabocates, Leucates^ Teridates, Mithridates, Atti- 
dateSy OsquidateSy Oxydates> Ardeates, Ele^tes, Bercoreates, 
CaninefateSy CasicenufuteSy Agates, Achates, Niphates, Deci- 
atesy AttaliateSy Mevaniates, Cari^tes, Quanates, Asseriates, 
Euburiates, Antiates, Spartiates, Celdates,. Hispellates, Stel- 
latesy Suillates, Albulates^ Focimates, AuximateSy Flanates, 
Edenatesy Fidenates, Suffenates, Fregenates, Capenates^ Senates^ 
CoesenateSy Misenates, Padinates, Fulginates, Merinates, Ala- 
trinates, iSsinates, Agesinates, Asisinates, Sassinates, Sessinates;^ 
Frusinates, Atinates, Altinates, ToIlenCinates, FerentinateSy In- 
tcramnatesy Chelonates, Casmonates, Amates, Tifernates, In- 
fernates, Piivernates, Oroates, Eaphrattes, Orates> Vasates, Co- 
cosates, Tolosates, Antoates, Nantuates, Sadyates, Caryates. 

Accent tht Antepenultimate. 

Spidiobates, Eurybates, Antiphates, Trebiates, Zalates, Sau- 
romates, Attiiiates, Tornates, Hy pates,* Memnecrates, Phere- 
crates, Iphicrates, Callicrates, Epicrates, P^sicrates, Stasicrates, 
Sosicrates, Hypsicrates, Nicocrates, Halocrates, Damocrates, 
Demoorates, Chereinocrate^, Timocrates, Heimocirates, Stefio^ 



.^ All words ending in crates have the acent on tbe aiitepennltimtte sjihible. 



( 150 ) 

crates, Xenocrates, Hippocrates^ Harpocrates, Socrates, Iso- 
crates, Cephisocrates, Naucrates, Eucrates, Euthycrates, Poly- 
crates. 

ETES ITES OTES UTES YTES YES ZES 

Accent the Penultimate, 

Acetes, Ericetes, Cadetes, ^etes, Mocragetes, Caletes, Plii- 
locletes, ^gletes, Nemetes, Cometes, Ulinanetes, Consuanetes, 
Gymnetes, ^symnetes, Nannetes, Serretes, Curetes, Theatetes, 
Andizetes, Odites, Belgites, Margites, Memphites, Ancalites, 
Ambialites, Avalites, Cariosuelites, Polites, Apoliopolites, Her- 
mopolites, Latopolites, Abulites, Stylites, Borysthenites, Temc- 
nites, Syenites, Carcinites, Samnites, Deiopites, Garites, Cen- 
trites, Thersites, Narcissites, Asphaltites, Hydraotes, Hera- 
cleotes, Boeotes, Helotes, Bootes, Thootes, Anaguutes, Ari- 
mazes. 

Accejit the Antepenultimate, 

Dercetes, Massagetes, Iiidigetes, Ilergetes, Euergetes, Au- 
chetes, Eusipetes, Abalites, Charites, Cerites, Praestites, An- 
dramytes^ Dariaves, Ardyes, Machlyes, Blemmyes. 

AIS 

Accent the Penultimate, 
Achais, Archelais, Homolais, Ptolemais, Elymais. 

- Accent the Antepenultimate, 
Thebais, Phocais, Aglais, Tanais, Cratais. 

BIS CIS DIS 

Accent the Penultimate, 
Berenicis, Cephaledis, I^ycomedis. 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 
Acabis, Carabis, Setabis, Nisibis, Cleobis, Tucrobis, Tiso- 
bis, Ucubis, Curubis, Saimacis, Aciuacis, Brovonacis, Athracis, 
Agnicis, Carambucis, Cadmeidis. 

EIS * ETHIS ATHIS 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Medeis, Spercheis, Pittheis, Crytheis, Nepheleis, Eleleis, 



* Tfajsse vowcl0 fiurm disthict syllables.-— See the tenniDation EIUS. 



( 151 ) 

Achilleis, Pimpleis, Cadmeis, -Sneis, Schoeneis, Peneis, Acri- 
soneis, Triopeis, Patereis, Nereis, Cenchreis, Theseis, Briseis, 
Perseis, Messeis, Chryseis, Nycteis, Sebethis^ Epimethis. 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 
'rhymiathis. 

ALIS ELIS ILIS tOLIS ULIS YLIS 

Accerit the Penvltimate. 

Andafoalis, Cercalis, Regalis, Stymphalis, Dialis, Lati^Iis, 
Septifnontialis, Martialis, Manalis, Juvenalis, Quirinalis, Fonti* 
nalis, Junonalis, Avemalis, Vacunalis, Abrupalis, Floraiis, 
Quietalis, Eumtelis, Phaselis, Eupilis, Quinctiiis, Adulis. 

Accent the^ Antepenultimate. 

CEbalis, Hannibalis, Acacalis, Fomicalis, Androcalis, Lu« 
percalis, Vahalis, Ischalis, Caralis, Thessalis, Italis, Facelis, 
Sicelis, Fascelis^ Vindelis, Nephelis, Sibiiis, Incibilis, Leucre- 
tilis, Myrtilis, Indivilis, iEeolis, Argolis, Cimolis, Decapolis, 
Neapolis, and all words ending in polis. Herculis, Tliestylis. 

AMIS EMIS 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 
. Calamis, Salamis, Semiramis, Thyamis, Artemis. 

ANIS ENIS INIS ONIS YNIS 

uiccent the Penultimate. 

# 

Mandanis, Titanis, Bacenis, Mycenis, Philenis, Cyllenisy 
Ismenis, Cebrenis, Adonis, Edonis, iBdonis, Thedonis, Sido- 
nis, Dodonis, Calydouis, Agonis, . Alingonis, Colonis, Corbu- 
lonis,. Gremonis, Szilmonis, Junonis, Ciceronis, Scironis, Coro- 
ni», Phoronis, Turonis (in Germany), Tritonis, Phorcynis, 
Gortynis. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Sicanis, Anticanis, Andanis, Hypanis, Taranis, Prytanis, 
Poemanis, Eumenis, Lycaonis, Asconis, Maeonis^ Paeonis, Si 
thonis, Memnonis, Pa^monis, Turonis (in JPraace), Bitoois, 
Geryonis. 



( 152 ) 

O I s* 

Accent the Penultimate. ^ 

Minois^ HeroisyLatois. 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 1 

C* ••• T* ••• 

bymois, Fyrois. 

APIS OPIS 

Accent the Penultimate. 
lapis^ Colapisy Serapisf , Isapis, Asopis. ^ 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 
Acapjs^ Minapisy Cecropis^ Meropis. 

ARIS ACRIS ERIS IGRIS IRIS ITRIS ORIS URIS 

YRIS 

Accent the Penultimate. 

BalGftrisy ApoHinaris, Nonacris, Cimmeris^ Aciris, Osirii^ 
Fetosiris^ Busiris^ Lycoris, Calaguris, Gracchuris^ Hippuns. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Abaris, Fabvis, Sybaris, Icaiin^ Andaris^ Tyndaris^ Sagaris^ 
Angarisy Phalaris, Elaris^ Caularis, Taenaris, liparisy Araris, 
Biasaris, Caesaris, Abisaris, Achisiam, Bassaris, Melaris, Au- 
taris, Trinacris^ lUiberis, Tiberis, Zioberis, Tyberis, Nepheris^ 
Cytfaeris, Pieris, Trieris, Ausem, Pasitigns, Coboiisy Sicoris^ 
Keorisy Peloris, Antipatris, Absitris, Pacyris, Ogyria, PorphyFis, 
Amyris> Thamyris, Tniomyris, Tomyris. 

ASIS ESIS ISIS 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Amasis, Magnesis, Tuesia. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Bubasis^ F^asisy Parrhasisy Paniasb, Acamasis,. Engon^fb^ 
Grseostasis^ Lachesis^ Athesis, Thamesis^ Neaies% llbisis. 

E N SI S 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Genubensis^ Cordubensis^ and all words of this tenmnation. 



* 'Hmk vawds ' forrii'^ittiiict tyBableik 

t &riipi«.— See te word in the IwUMVoctMrnrp 



<a>i<»>nj 



( 153 ) 

OSIS USIS 

Accent the Penultimate^ 

£>ian[iast]go9is^ Eno^is, Eleusis. 

ATIS ETIS ITIS OTIS YTIS 

Accent the Penultimate, 

Tegeatis, Sarmatis, Caryatis, Hiletisi, timenetis, Curetis, 
Acervitisy ChalcitM, Memphitisy Sophitis^ At^elifis, FaMaUtisy 
Dascylitis^ Comitis, ^anitis, Canankis^ Circinitis, Sebennitis, 
Chaonitisy Trachonitis, Chalonitis, Sybaiitis, Daiitis, Calen- 
deritis, Zephyritis^ Amphaxitis^ Rhacotis^ Estiaeotisy Maeotis, 
Tracheotis, Mareotis, Pntbiotis^ Sandaliotis^ JBSimiotis^ Ifloario- 
iis^ Casiotis^ Philotis, Nilotis. 

Accent the Antepenuttimate, 

Atergatifip^ Calatis^ Afiatis^ Naticrati?, Dto:etS$^ Eiiff6a^ 

OVIS UIS XIS 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Amphaxis, Oaxis, Alexi9> 2kamoki89 iZeuxis. 

Accent the Antepenultimaie. 

Vejovb, Dljovis, Absitiiis. 

ICOS EDOS ODOS YDOS 

Accent the Penultimate, 
Abydos. 

Accent the Antepeffultimate, 

Oricos, Tenedos, Macedos, Agriodos. 

EOS 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Spercheos, Achilleos. 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 

Androgeosiy Egaleos, iEgaleos, Hegal^os. 

IGOS ICHOS OCHOS OPHOS 
Accent, the Penultinktte, 
Melaropigoa, Naoatkiboft^.Maoroiitidbofk 



( 154 ) 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Nerigos, £giocfaos, Oresitrophos. 

ATHOS ETHOS ITHOS lOS 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Sebethos. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Sciathos, Arithos, Ilios, Ombrios^ Topasios. 

LOS MOS NOS ROS 

Accent the Penultimate. 

' Slymphalos, ^gilos, Pachinos^ Etheonos^ Eteonos, Hepta- 
phonos. « 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Ha^os, JEgialoSy Ampelos, Hexapylos/ Slpylos, Hecatom- 
pyloSy Potamosy iEgospotamos, Olenos, Orchomenos^ Anapaii- 
omenos^ Epidicazomenos, Heautontimorumenos^ Antropos. 

ROS SOS TOS ZOS 

Accent the Penultimate, 

MeleagroSy Hecatoncheros, iEgimuros^ Nisyros, Pityonesos, 
Hieronesosy Cephesos, Sebetos, Haliaeetos^ Miletos, Polytime- 
tosy Aretos, Buthrotos, Topazos. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

S^aros, .XgoceroSy Anteros, Meleagros, Myiagros, Absoros, 
Amyros, P^asos, Jalysos, Abatos, Ai-etos, Ncritos, Acytos. 

IPS OPS 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
iEgilips^ iEthiops. 

LAUS MAUS NAUS RAUS (in two syllables.) 

Accetit the Penultimate. 

Archelaus, Menelaus, Aglaus^ Agesilaus^ Protesilaus, Nico- 
lauSy lolauS; Hermolaus^ Critolaus,. Aristolaus, Dorylaus^ Am- 
phiaraus. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Imaus*, Emmaus/ CEaomaus, Danaiis. 

* /moM.— See the word in th« Imtwl V^etMai^. , 



( 155 ) 

BUS 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 

Agabus, Alabus, Arabus, Melabus, Setabus, Erebus, Ctesi- . 
bus, Deiphobus, Abubus, Polybus. 

A C U S 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Abdacus, Labdacus, Rhyudacus, £acus, Idiacus* 

I A C U S* 

Accent the Ajitepenultimatc, 

lalciacus, Pkidiacus, Alabandiacus, Rhodiacus, Calchiacus, 
Corinthiacus, Deliacus, Peliacus, Iliacus, Niliacus, Titaniacus, 
Amieiiiacus, Messeniacus, Salaminiacus, Leniuiacus, ■ loniacus^ 
Sammoniacus, Tritoniacus, Gortyniacus, Olympiacus, Caspia- 
cus, Mesembriacus, Adiiaciis, Iberiacus, Cytheriacus, Siriacus, 
Gessoriacus, Cytoriacus, Syriacus, Phasiacus, Megalesiacus, 
Etesiacus, Isiacus, Gnosiacus, Cnossiaciis, Pausiaciis, Amadiu- 
siacus, Pelusiacus, Prusiacus, Actiacus, Divitiacus,, Byzantia- 
cus, Theimodontiacus, Propontiacus, Hellespontiacus, Ses- 
tiacus. 

LACUS NACUS OACUS RACCS SACUS TACUS 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Benacus. 

Accent the Atitepennltimate. 

Ablacus, Medoacus, Armaracus, Assaracus, ^sacus, Lamp- 
sacus, Caractacus, Spartacus, Hyrtacus, Pittacus. 

I c u s 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Caicus, Numicus, Demonicus, Granicus, Audronicus, Stra- 
tonicus, Callistonicus, Aristonicus, Alaricus, Albericus, Rode- 
ricus, Rudeikus, Komericus, Hunnericus, Victoricus, Aina« 
tricus, Heuricus, Tlieodoricus, Ludpvicus, Grenovicus, Var- 
vicus. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Thebaicus, Pkocaicus, ChaldUicus, Bard'aieus, Judaicus, 

Achaicus, Lechaicus, Panchaicua, Therniaicus, Naicus, Pana- 

- - I 

V* AH words of thb tenoinatioii have the accent on the if, pronouiiced like jthe 
nou^ fye. 



( 156 ) 

thenaicus, Cyrenaicus, Arabicus, Dacicus, Samothracicus, Tur* 
cicus^ Areadicus, Sotadicus, Threcidicus, Chalcidicus, Alaban* 
dicus^ Judicus, Clondiciis, Coraificus, Belgicus, Ailobrogicus, 
Georgicus, Colchicus^ Delpliicus, S^pphicus, Parthicus, Scy- 
thicus^ Pythicus, Styniphalicus^ Phartolicus, Tliessalicws, Itali- 
cus, Attalicus, Gdiicus, Sabellicus, Tarbellicus, Argoljcus, 
Getulicus, Camicus, Ceramiciis, Academicus, Graecanicus, 
Cocanicus, Tuscauicus, iEanicus, Hellaiiicus^ Glanicus, Atel- 
lanicus, Amanicus^ Romanicus, Germanicus^ Hispamcus, Aqui- 
tanicus, Sequanicus, Poenicus, Aleni^nnicus, Britannicus, La- 
ronicus, Leuconicus, Adoriicuis, Macedonicus, Sandonicus, 
lonicuSy Hermionicus, Babylonicus, Samonicus, Pannonicus, 
Hieronicus, Platonica?, Santonicus, Sophroiiicus, Teutonicus, 
Amazonicus, Hernicus, Libuniicus, Euboicus, Troicus, Stcii- 
<nis, Glympicus, ^thiopicus, Pindaricus, Balcaricus, Marma- 
ricus, Bassaricus, Cimbricus, Andricus, Ibericus, Trietericusi 
Irevericus, Africus, Doricus, . Pythagoricus, Leuctricus, Ad- 
gandestiicuSy Jstricus/fsauricus, Centauricus, Bituricus, lUyri- 
<iu8, Syricus, Pagasicus, Moesicus^ Marskus, Persicus, Corsi- 
cusy Massicus, Issicus^ Sabbaticus^ Mithridaticus, Tegeaticus, 
Syriaticus, Asiaticiis^ Dalmaticus^ Sarmaticus, Cibyraticus, 
Ilhaeticus,*Geticus, Gangeticus^ ^Egineticus, Rhoeticus, Crefa- 
cus, Memphiticus, Sybariticus, Abderiticus, Celticus, Atlantic 
cus> GraramanticuSy Alenticus, Ponticus, Scojicus, Maeoticus, 
Boeoticus, HeracleoticiiSy Mareoticus, Phthioticus, Nilpticus, 
JEpiroticus^ Syrticus, Atticus, Alyatticus, Halyatticus, Medi- 
astuticus. 

ecus UCUS YCUS 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Ophiucus^ Inycus. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

LauodocuSy Amodocus, Amphilocus, Ibycus, libycus, Bes-* 
bycus, Autolycus^ Amycus, Glanycus^ Corycus. 

ADUS EDUS IDUS ODUS YDUS 

« 

Accent the Penultimate. , 

Lebedus, Congedus^ Alfredus^ AlUredus^ Emodus, Andro- 
du8. 

Accent the Antepenultimute. 

Adadusy Encdadus^ Aradus, Antaradus, Aufidus, Algidus, 
liepidus^ Hediodod, Csmmbdus^ Monodus, LacyduSy Polydus. 



( 157 ) 

iEUS GEUS 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Niob^eus^ M eliboeus, and all words of this termination. 

E U S* 

Accent the Pentiltimate. 

* Lycambeus, Tliisbeus, Bereniceiis, Lynceus (the brother of 
Idas), Simonideus, Euripideus, Pherecydeusj Piraeeus, Phege- 
us, Tegeus, Sigeus, Ennosigcus, Argeus, Baccheus, Motojr- 
dieusy Cepheus^ Rhipheus, Alpheus, Orpheus (adjective), 
Erecthens, Prometheus (adjective), Cleantheus^ Rhadamantfaeus, 
Erymantheus, Pantheus (adjective), Dajdaleus, Sophocleuja, 
Thentistocleus, Eleus, Neleus (adjective), Oileus (actjective), 
Apelleus, Achilleus, Perilleus, LucuUeus, Agylleus, Pimpleus, 
Ebuleus, Asculeud, Masculeus, Cadmeus, Aristophaiieus, Car 
naneus, CEneus (adj. 3 syll.), CEneus (sub. 2 sylL), Idome- 
neus, Schoen^us, Peneus, Phineus, Cydoneus, Androgeoneus, 
Bioneus, DeucalioneuB, Acrisioneus, Salmoneus (adjectiye)^ 
Maroneus, Antenoreus, Phoroneus (adjective), Thyoueus, Cyr- 
neus, Epeus, Cj^clopeus, Penelopeus, Pliillipeus, Aganippeus, 
Menandreus {adjective), Nereus, Z'agreus, Boreus, Hyperbo- 
reus, Pplydoreus, Atreus '(adjective), Centaureus, Nesseus, 
Cisseus, CEteus, Rhoeteus, Anteus, Abanteus, Phalanteus^ Th^- 
rodamanteus, Polydamanteus, Thoauteus, Hyanteus, Aconteus, 
Laomedonteus, Thermodonteus, Phaethonteus, Phlegethonteus, 
Oronteus, Thyesteus, Phryxeus. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Gerionaceus, Monoeceus, LynotUs (adjective), Dorceus^ 
Caduceus, Asclepiadeus, Pala'deus, Sotadeus, Tydeus, Orpheus 
(substantive), Morpheus, Tyrrheus, Prometheus (substantive), 

Cretheus, Mnesitheus, Dositheus, Pifitheus (substantive), Smit^ 

^ ' ^ — — — '• — -— ^ 

* It may be observed, tliat words of tM^ terroination are somethnes both fob- 

jitantives and adjectives^ When they are substantives, they have the accent on 

the antepenultimate syllable, as Nff leusy Frana^ theusy Salmo'neug, &c. ; and when 

adjectives on the penultimate, as Neleus Prometfie' us, Salmonefus, &c, Thli|» 

CEneuffyakingof Getlydouia, is pronowiced in two syllables; the adjective CERJif^, 

which is formed from it, is a trisyllable ; and (En'eiuSf another formative of it, is 

t word of four syllables. Bat th6se words, when formed into English adjectives, 

alter their termination with the accent on the Penultimate : 

^ With other notes than to the Orphean lyre Milton. 

The tuneful tongue, the Promethean, band. Akeksioe. 

/4nd sometimes on the Antepenultimate, as 

The squ, lu from Thyesiian banquet tam'd.--— >MiLToir« 



I 



( 158 ) 

theusy Timolheus, Brotheus, Dorotheus, Meiiestheus, Eurys- 
theusy Pittheus, Pylheus, Dsedaleu^s, ^gialeus, Maleus, Tanta- 
leus, Heracleus^ Celeus, Eleleus, Neleus, Pelens, Nileus, 
Oileus (substantive), Demoleus, Roiiiuleus, Pergameus, 
EuganeuSy Melaneus, Herculaneiis, Cyaneus, Tyaneus, Ce- 
neus, DicaneuSy Pheneus, Qilneus, Cupidineus, Apoliineus, 
Enneiis^ Adoneus, Aridoneus, Goi-goneus, Deioneus, Iliooeus, 
Mimalloneus, Salmoneus (substantive), Acroneus, Pboroneus 
(substantive), Albuneus, Enipeus, Sinopeus, Hippeus, Aristip- 
peus, Areus, Macareus, Tyndareus, Megareus (substantive), 
Caphareus (substantive), Briareus, -SEsareus, Patareus, Cytbe- 
reus, Phalereus, Nereus (substantive), Teieus, Adoreus, Mento- 
reus, Nestoreus, Atreus (substantive), Caucaseus, Pegaseus, 
Theseus, Perseus, Nicteus, Argenteus, Bronteus, Proteus, 
Agyeus. 

AGUS ECUS IGUS OGUS 

Accent the Penultimate, 

Cethegus, Robigus, Rubigus. 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 

j^gophagus, Osphagus, Neomagns, Rothomagus, Niomagus, 
Noviomagus, CsBsaromagus, Sitoniagus> Areopagus, Harpagus, 
Arviragus, Uragus, Astrologus. 

ACHUS OCHUS UCHUS YCHUS 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Daduchus, Opbiuchus. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Telemachus,. Daimachug, Deimachus, Alcimachus, Callima- 
chus, Lysimacbus, Antiqiacbus, Symmachus, Andromachus, 
Clitomachus, Aristomachui, Eurymachus, Inachus, lamblichus, 
Demodochus, Xenodochus^'* Deiochus, Antiochus, Deilochu?, 
Archilochus, Mnesilochus, Thersilochus, Orsilochns, Antilo- 
chus, Nauiochus, Eurylochus, Agerochus, Monychus, Abrony- 
chus, Polyochus. 

APHUS EPHUS IPHUS OPHUS YPHUS 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Josephus, Seiiphus. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Ascalaphus, Epaphus, Palaepaphus, Anthropograp.hus, Tele- 
phus, Absepbus, Agastfophus, Sisyphus. 



( 159 ) 

ATHUS iETHUS ITHUS, 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Simsethus. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Archagathus, Amathus, Lapathus, Carpadius, Mychithus. 

A I U S 

Accent the Antepenultimate. * 
C'aiuSy Laiusy Graius. — See Achaia. 

ABIUS IBIUS OBIUS UBIUS YBIUS 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Fabius, Arabius, Baebius, Yibius, Albius, Amobius, Macro- 
bius, Androbius, Tobius, Yirbius, Lesbius, Eubius, Danubius, 
Marrhubius, Talthybius; Polybius. 

C I u s 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Acacius^ Ambrachis^ Acracius, ThraciuiSy Athracius, Samor 
thracius^ Lampsacius, Arsacius, Byzacius, Accius, Siccius, 
DeciuSy Threicius, Comificius, Ciliciiis^ Numicius, Apicius, 
SiilpiciuSy Fabricius, Orichis, Cincius, Mincius, Marcius, 
Circius, Hircius, Roscius, Albucius, Lucius, Lycius, Bebry- 
cius. 

r> I u s 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

l^ccadius, Icadius, Arcadius, Palladius, Tenedius, Albidiusy 
DidiuSy Thucydidius, Fidius, Aufidius^ Eufidius, ^gidius; 
NigidiuSy Obsidius, Gratidius, Brutidiu», Helvidius, Ovidius, 
Rhodius, Clodiusy Hannodius, Gordius^ Claudius, Rudiu9j 
Lydius. 

EIUS* 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Daneius, Cocceius, Lyrceius, ^acideius, Lel^us, Si- 
geius, Baccheius, Cepheius, Typhoeeius, Cretheius, Pittheius, 

* Almost all the wcrds of this termination are adjectiyes, and in these the 
vowels ei fo^m' distinct syllables ; the others, i^ CoceeiuSf SakhUy Proeulemn, 



< 160 ) 

Saleius, Semeleinsy Ndeius^ Sthenelents, 'Proeuleius^ Septimu- 
leius, Canuleiusy VjQQul^iia, Apuleius, Sgnatuleius, Sypyleius, 
PriameiuSy Cadmeius, Tyaneius, ^neius, Clymeneius, CEoetuSy 
Autoneius^ Schoea^HiBy Lampeius, Rbodopeius, Dolopeius^ 
Priap^iuse, Pompeius, Tarpeius, Cynareius, Cythereius, Ne- 
reids, Satureius, Vultureius, Cinyreius, Nyseius, T^us, He- 
qitjeius, Elateius^ Rbosteius^ Atteii^, Minyeius. 

G I U S 

Accent Me AntepenultmaU. 
Valgius, 3e^us^ Catfui^ius^ Sei^uis, Ascdbiirgtusi, Oxygius. 

CHJBIS PHIU^ THIUS 

Accent the Penultimate. 
SipccdhiujL, 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

. Inachius^ Bacchius, DuUcbius^ Telechius, Munychjus, 
Uesychius, Tychius, Cyniphius, Alphiiis, Adelphius, Sisy- 
phius^ Einathius^ SimsediiuSy Acithius, Melanthiua, Eryman- 
iinuB, Corinliius, Zerynthkis^ Tirynthius. 

Alius MELIUS EUUS ILIUS UUUS YLIUS - 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

CEbalius, Tdalius, Acidsjius^ Palaephalius, Stymphalius, Mae- 
naliusy Opalius, Thessalius, Castalius, Piiblius, Heraclius*, 
JEXiViS^ Cxliusy LaBliuSy Detkis, Melkts, Cornelius, Coelius, 
Cloelius; Aurelius, NyctelkiSy Praxitelius, Abilius, Babilius, 



< l | . 1 ' ' i 'l . ' '< . I ■ M ' ^ t 



QHK^tim^ ApvUim JBe9fiiHim8f Sfihtmeim, Lampeius, VuUvrewi^ Attdus, and 
4inif!8ii»y are ^iih»taiitives) and which, tbeu|^h sometimes pronounced with the 
Dl fixrauog a dipthong, and jBonn4ed like the noun ey4, are more generally heard 
like tiie adjectives ; so that the whole list may be fairly inclnded under the same 
general rule, that of sounding the € separate^, and the i like y consonant, as in 
the similar terminations in eia and ia. This is the more necessary in these 
wordsy as the accented e and tiie nsaecented t are so nuch alike as to require 
]^ sound of the initial i>r consonant y., in order to prevent the hiatus, bj. giving 
a.smstt di?erai^ to Ihe two vowels»r^ee Actuda. 

^ Lal>be placea the accent of thi» wcfd on the penultimate t, as in HeradU^ 
«pd UmmcUdm; but the Ronan emperor of this name is so generally pronounced 
mik te antepeoaltiinate acc^, that it would savc^ir of pedantry to alter iu 
|kf d* I wfiimtBDd the reasons og which Labbe founds bis accentuation. 



\ 



( 161 ) 

darbiliuSy Orbilius, Acilius, CseciliuS; Lucilios, ^diliuis, Vii^ 
gilius ^niilius, Manilius^ Pompilius, Turpilius, Atilius, , Basi- 
lius^y Cantiliusy Quintilius, Hostilius^ Attilius, Rutilius, Duilius^ 
SterquiliuS; Carvilius^ Servilius^ Cailius, Trebellius, Cascellius^ 
Gellius, Arellius^ Vitellius^ Tullius^ Maulius, Tenolius, Nauplius^ 
t>auliaS| Juliud> Amulius, Pamphylias, Pylius. 

MIUS 

Atceni the Antepenultimate. 

SamiuSy Ogmius^ Isthmius, Decimius^ Septimius, Rhemmius^ 
Memmius^ Mummiu?, Nomius^ Bromius, Latmius^ Posthu« 

ANIUS EiNltS INIU^ ENNIUS 

Accent the Antepenultimate: 

Adius^ Libaniusy Oanius^ Sicanius, Yulcamus, Ascanius, Dar-' 
^ianius, Clanius, Manius, Afiraniusy Granius, ^nius^ Maeniud, 
Genius, Borysthenius, Lenius, Yalenius, Cyllenius, Olenius, 
MeniuSy Achaemenius, Armenius, IsmeikUis, Poenius, Sirenhis, 
Messenius, Dossenius, Polyxenius, Troezeniusi Gabinius, A1-* 
binius^ Licinius, Sicmius, Virginius, Trachinius, Minius, Sala-^ 
minius, FlairiiniuSy Etithinitis, Artninius, Herminius, Caninius^ 
TetritiiiiuSy Asinius, Eltsusinius, Yatinius, Flavinius, TarquiniuSy' 
CilniuSy TolumniuSy AnniuBi Fannius, ElaimiuS; Eimius, Ve^ 
cennius, iDossenniuSi 

ONIUS UNIUS Y^IUS OtUS 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

A&kauB, Lycaoniusy Chaonilts, Machaoniu^, AniythaoiiiuSy 
Trebo^Us, Heliconius, StUiccxiius, Asconiu^, Macedooius, Ghaln 
cedoniuSy Caledonius, Sidonius, Alchandonius, Mandonius, 
Dodonius, Cydonius, Calydonius/ Maeonhis, PaBonius, Ago-^ 
niusy Gorgonius, Lsestrygonius, Lestrygonius, Trophonius, 
Sophoniusy Maratbonius^ Sitfaonius, EricthoniuSy Aphtho-^ 
nius, Arganthonius, Tithonius^ lonius^ CEdipodionius, Echkn 
liius; Ixioniusy Salonius, Milouius, ApolloniuS| Babylornqs^ 



. ^lliis Word, tiie learned contend^ ought to have the accent on the penoK 
timate; but that the learned frequently depart from this pronunciation^ b j 
placing tiie itecenton the anteptaultimate, may he seen. Role Sl> pra^ifd it 
tlie InituU FfM^nforyA 

M • 



( 162 ) 

Mmoniiis, LacedaemoniuSy Haemonias, Palaemonius^ Aftimo^ 
i^us, Strymonius, Nonius, Memnonius, Agamemnomus, Cran- 
nonius, Veimonius, Junonius, Pomponius, Acronius, Sopliro* 
iiius, Scironius, Sempronius, Antronius, iEsonius, Ausoniu^i 
Latooiusy Suetonius, Antonius, Bistonius, Plutonius, Favonius, 
Amazonius, Esernius, Calphurnius, Satumius, Daunius, Junius^ 
Neptunius, Gortynius, Typhbius, Achelbius, Minbius, Trbius. 

APIUS OPIUS IPIUS 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Agapius, ^sculapius, .Xsapius, Messapius, Grampius, Pro* 
copius, CEnopius, Cecropius, Eutropius, ^sopius, Mopsopiut, 
Gippius, Puppius, Caspius, Thespius, Cispius. 

ARIUS ERIUS IRIUS ORIUS URIUS YRIUS 

Accent the Pemiltimate, 
Darius. 

Accent the Antepenudtiniate. 

Arius, Icarius, Tarcundarius, Ligarius, Sangarius, Corinthi-: 
arius, Larius, Marius, Hierosolymarius,^ iEinarius, Taenarius^ 
Asinarius, Isinarius, Varius, Januanus, Aquarius, Februarius^ 
Atuarios, Inibrius, Adrius, Evandrius, Laberius, Biberius, Ti^ 
berius, Celtiberius, Vinderius, Acherius, Valerius, Numerius^^' 
Hesperius, Agrius, CEagrius, Cendirius, Rabirius, Podalirius, 
Sinus, Virius, Bosphorius, Elorius, Florins, Actorius, Anacto- 
rius, Sertorius, Caprius, Cyprius, Arrius, Feretrius, C£notrius„ 
Ad^andestrius, Caystrius, Epidaurius, Ciu-ius, Mercurius, Du*-: 
riiis, Furiiis, Palfurius, Thurius, .Manuirius, Purius, Masurius^ 
Spurius, Veturius, Asturiiis^ Atabyrius, Scyriqs, Porphyrius^ 
Assyrius, Tyrius. 

ASIUS ESIUS ISTUS OSIUS USIUS YSIUS 

Accent the Antepenultimate. ) 

Asius, Casius, Thasius, Jasius, iEsius, Acesius, Coracesiu9, 
Arcesius, A'lendesius, Chesius, Ephesius, Milesius, Theume'' 
sius, Teumesius, JBnesius, Magnesius, Proconnesius, Chersb- 
nesius, Lymesius, Marpesius, Acasesius, Melitesius, A^lisiiis, 
Aliiisius, Artemisius,' Simbisius, Cbarisius, Acrisius^ Horten- 
siuS| Syracosius, Theodosius, Guosius, Sosius, - Mopsius, Caift-: 



( i6i ) 

nus, Thalassilis^ Lymessius^ Cressius, Tartessius, Syracusiui^ 
Fusius, Agusius^ Amathusius^ Ophiiisius, Ariusius^ Volusius^ 
SelinusiuS; Acherusius^ Maurudius^ Lysius, Elysius, Dionyskii, 
OdiysiuS; AmphrysiuSj Othrysius. 

ATIUS ETIUS ITIUS OTIUS UTIUS ^ 

Accent the Penultimatei ' 

Xenophontiiis. 

Accent the Antepentiltimitei 

Trebatius, Catiud, Volcatiud^ Achatius, Latius^ Caesehatiiti^^ 
)Egnatius^ Gratius, Horatius^ Tatius, Luctatius^ Statius^ Actius^ 
Vectius, Quinctius^ Aetius, ^tius, Panaetius^ Praetius, Cetius, 
Caeetius, Vegitius, Metius^ Moenetiu^^ Lucretius, Helvetius^ 
SaturaalitiuSy Floralitius, Compialitius, ^DomitiuS; Beritius, 
NeritiuSy Crassitius> Titius, Politius, Abundantius, Paeautius, 
Taulantius, Acamantius, Teuthrantius, Lactantius, Hyantius^ 
Byzantius, Tefentius, CluentiuS; Maxentius, Mezentius, Quin« 
tills, Acontius, Vocontius, Laomedontius, Leontius, Pontius, 
Hellespontius, Acheroutius, Bacuntius, Opuntius, Aruntius, 
Maeotius, lliesprotius, Scaptius, ^gyptius> Martius, Laertius, 
Propertius, Hirtius, Mavortius, Tiburtius, Curtius, Thestius^ . 
Themistius, Canistius^ Sallustius, Crustius, Carystius, Hymet- 
tius, Bruttius/ Abutius, Ebutius^ ^butius, Albutius, Acutius^ 
liocutius, Stercutius, Mutius, Minutius, Pfietutids, Clytius, 
Bavius, Flavius, Narvius, Evius, Maevius, Naevius, Ambiviu^ 
livius, Milvius^ Fulvius, Sylvius, Novius, Servius, Vesvius^ 
Pacuvius, Vitravius^ Vesuvius, Axius, Naxius, Alexius, Ixiua, 
Sttbazius. 

ALUS CLUS ELUS ILUS OLUS ULUS YLUS 

Accent the Penultimate, 

Stymphalus, Sardanapaliis, Androclus, Pdtroclus, Borycluft, 
Orbelus, Philomelus, Eumelus, Phasa'elus, Phaselus^ Cyrsi- 
lus, Cimolus, Timolus, Tmolus, Mausolus, Pactolua, -^tolus^ 
Atabulus, Praxibulus, Cleobulus, Critobulus, Acontobulus^ 
Aristobulus, Eub'ulus, Thrasybulus^ Getulus, Bargylus, Ma9^ 
i^lus. 

Accent (he Anlepennllimaie. 

Abalus, Heliogabalus, Corbalus, Bubalus, Cocalus^ 0tt» 

Mfi 



( 164 > 

<klasy Idalosy Acidalu^y Megalus, Traehaliuiy Cephalua, Cyno^ 
cephalus, Bucephalus^ Anchialus^ Maenalus^ Hippalos, Harpa^ 
lu8^ Bupalusy Hypalusy Thessalus, Italus, Tant^us, Crotalu8|c 
Ortalus, Attalusy Euryalus, Doiyclus, Stiphelus, Sthenelus^ 
Eutrapelus, Cypselus, Babilus, Diphilus, Antiphilus, Pam« 
philus, Theophilus, Damophilus^ Troilus, Zoilus, Choerilus, 
Myrtilus, ^gobolus^ Naubolus, Equicolus, ^olus, Laureolua, 
Anchemolus, Bibulus, Bibaculus, Caeculus, Gra^ulus, Sicu« 
lus, Saticulus, ^quiculus^ Paterculus, Acisculwr^ Reguhis> 
Romulus, Yenulusy Apulus, Salisubsulus, Vesulus, Catulus, 
Gaetulusy Getulus, Opitulus, Lentulu^, Rutulus, Mschylus^ 
Deiphylu5, Demylus, Deipyhis, Sipylus, Empylus, Cra^Ius^ 
Astylus. 

AMUS EMUS IMUS OMIJS UMUS YMUS 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Callideimis, Charidemus, Pethodemus, Phllodemus, Phano* 
demusy ClitodemuSy Aristodemus, Polyphemus, llieotimus, 
Hermotimus, Aiistotimus, Ithomus. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Lygdamu9, Archidamus, Agesidamus, Apusidamitt, Anaxi- 
damus, Zeuxidamus, Androdamus, Xenodamus, Cogamus, Per* 
gamus, Orchamus, Priamus, Oimiamus, Ceramus, Abdiramus, 
Pyramus, Anthemus, Telemus, Tlepolemus, Theopolemus,; 
Neoptolemus, Phsedimus, Abdalonimus, Zosimus, Maximua, 
Antidomus, Amphinomus, Nicodromus, Didymus, Dindymus, 
Helymus, Solymus, Cleonymus, Abdalooymus^ HieroHymui^ 
Euonymus, iEsymus. 

ANUS 
Accent the Penultimate^ 

' Artabanus, Cebanu^, Thebamis, A^banus,^ Nerbai^us, Vcr- 
banus, Labicanus, Gallicanus, Africanus, Sicamis, Vaticanus, 
Lavicamis, Vulcamis, H}Tcanus, Lucamis, Transpadanus, 
Pedamis, Apidanus, Pundanus, Codanus, Eanus, Garganuf, 
Murhanus, Baianus, Trajanus, Fabianus^ Accianus, Prisci-^ 
anus, Roscianus, Liucianus, Seleucianus, Herodianus, Claudi- 
anus, Saturcia&us, Sejanus, Carteiaous,. JEliaiias, Affliamu,. 



( 165 ) 

LucilianuSy Virgilianus, Petilianus, QuintilianuSy CatuUianus^ 
TeitullianuSy Julianus^ Ammianus, Memmianus, Fonnianus, 
Dipgeniaoiis, ScandhuamiSy Papinianus, Valentimanus^ Justini* 
muxs, Trophonianus, OthonianuSy Pomponianus, JMaronianus, 
Apronianus, Thyonianus, Trojahus, Ulpianus, iEsopianus, 
ApianuSy Oppianus, Miurianus, Adrianus, Hadrianus, Hbe- 
nanus, Valerianus^i ^ Papirianus^ Vespasianus, Hortensianus, 
TheodosianuSy Bassiknus, Pelusianus, Diocletianus, Domhia- 
mis, AntiaQus, Scaotianus^ Teraitianus, Quintianus^ Sestianus, 
AugvstiaQusy SaUustianusy Pretutianus, Sextianus, Flavianus, 
Bovianijus, PacuviaDus, AlaouSy EWus, ^SUaaus, Fregellanus, 
Atellanus, RegiUaqus, Lucullanus^ Sullanus, Syllanus^ Car- 
aeolanusy Pateolanus^ Coriols^us/ Ocriculanusr, \£sculaniis^ 
Tusculanus, Carsulaniis, Fassulaniis^ Querquetulanus, Ama* 
nus, LemaiuiSy Summanus, Romanus, Bhenanus, Amenanus, 
Pucinanus, CimianuSy Campanus, Hispanu^i, Sacranus, Vena- 
iranusy Claranus, Ulubranus, Seranus, liiteranus, Coranus, 
Sorani^s, SerranuSy Suburraniis, Gauranus^ Suburaniis^ Ancy- 
rwus, Cosanusy Sinuessanus, Syracusanus, Satanusi^ Laletanus, 
TuoetanpSy AbretaQus^ Cretanus, Setabitanus/ Oaditanus, Trki* 
gitanusy CaralitanuSy Neapolitanus^ AntipolitaniiSy . Tomita- 
nuSf Taurominitanus, Sybaritanus, Upasitanus, Abderitanus, 
Tritanus^ Ancyritanus, Lucitanus, Pantanus, Ngentanus, 
Nomentanus, Beneventanus, MoHtanus, Spartanus, Paestanus^ 
Adelstanus^ Tu^nus, Sylvanus, AlbinovaauS; Adeaptuaaus, 
Mantuanus, 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

libanuSy Clibanusy Antilibanus, Oxycanus, Eridanus, Hho« 
danusy Dardanus^ OceanuSy Longimanus, Idumanus, Dripanus, 
Caranus, Adranus^ Geraiiiis, Tritantis^ Pantanus^ Sequaoua. 

E N U S 

Accent the Penultimate. * 

Characenus, Lampsacenus^ Astacenus, Picenus, Damasce- 
nusy SuiFenuSy Alfenus^ Alphenus, T}Trhenus^ Gabienus, La- 
bienus, Avidenus, Amenus, Pupienus^ Garienus, Cluvieous, 
Calenus, Galenus^ Sileuus, Pergamenus, Alexainenus, Isrne* 
BUS, ThrasymenuSy Trasymenus, Diopoenus, Capenus, Cebrenus, 
Fibieausy Serenus, Pabnyrenus^ Ama^eiui*; Tibisenus, MiseniUj 
JSv^DuS; B^'zenuSf 



( 108 ) 

Accent the Anlepenullimaie. 

AmbenuSy Hdenus^ Olenus, Tissamenus, Dexamenus^ Dia^ 
clumpnius, Clymenus, Periclymenus^ Axez^us^ CallixenuS| Phi^ 
)ozenu8^ Timoxenus, Aristoxenus. 

* INUS YNUS 

Accent the Fenullimaie* 

Cytainas, Gabinus^ Sabinus, Albinus, Sidicinus, Aricuius, 
Siciaus, Ticinus, Maocinus, Adminocinus, Carcinus, Coscir 
nusy MarruciDUSy Erycinus, Acadinus^ Caudinus, Cy^inus, 
Rufinus, Rheginus, Erginus^ OpiturginuSy Auginus^ Hyginus^ 
Pachinus, Echinus^ Delphinus/ Myrrhinus, Pothinus, Face- 
linus, Velinus, Stergilinus, Esquilinus^ JBsquilinus^ Caballinus, 
J^arcellinus, Tigellinus, Sibyllmus, Agyllirius, Solinus, Capi- 
tolinus, Geminus^y Maximinus, Cfastuminus, Anagninus, 
SigniHUS, Theoninus, Saloninus, Antoninus, Amiteminus, Sa- 
turninus^ Priapinus, Salapinus, Lepinus^ Alpinus, Inalipinus, 
Arpinus, Hirpinus^ Crispinus, Rutupinus, Lagarinus^ Chari- 
nus, Diochannus, Nonacrinus, Fibrinus, Lucrinus, Leandri-* 
nus, Alexandrinus, Iberinus, Tiberinus, Transtiberinus, Ame- 
nnusy £serinus, Quirinus^ Ceosorinusy Assorinusy Favorinus, 
Phavorinus, Taurinus, X^g^™"*^ Thurinus, Semurinus, Cy- 
rinus^ Myrinus, Gelasinus, Exasinus, Acesinus^ Halesinus^ 
Telesinusy Nepesinus, Brundisinus^ NurshmSy Narcissinus, 
libyssinus, Fuscini}s> Clusinus, Yenusinus, ^Perusinus, Susi* 
nus, ArdeatinuSy Reatinus, AntiatinuSy Latinus, Collatinus, 
CratinuSy Soracdnus, Aretinusy Arretinus, Setinus, Bantinus, 
Murgantinusy Phalantinus, Numantmus, Tridentinus, Ufentir 
nus, Murgentinusy Salentmus, PpUentinus/ Polentinus, Ta« 
rentinusy Terentinus, SurrentinuSy LaurentinuSy Aventinus^ 
TruentinuSy Leontinus, Pontinus, Metapontinus, Saguntinus, 
Martiuus, Mamertinus, Tiburtinus, Crastmus, PalaestinuSy Prae- 
nestinusy Atestinus, V estinus, AugustinuSy Justinus, Lavinus, 
Patavinus, Acuinus^ Elvinus^ CorvinuS; Ijuiuvinus^ Vesuvinus, 
Euxinus^ Acindynus. 



•»■ 



* Thiff is the name of a certain astrologer mentioned by PetaTiiiSy ^riudi 
Labb^ says ^.oold be pronoonced witb t^ accent op the anteperndtiyiato W 
1ho6e ijrfao ape ^lant pf Greek. 



( «5T ) 

Accent the AntepenvAtimate: 

^ PhainuSy Acinus, AlcinuSy Fucinus, ^acidmusr, Cyteinus, 
Barchinus, Morinus*, Myrrhinus, Terminus, Rominus, Eari» 
nus, Asinus, Apsinus, Myrsinas^ Pometinus, Agranj^nus^ 
Acindjnus. 

ONUS' UNUS YNUS 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Drachonus^ Onochonus, Ithonus, Tithonus^ Myronus, Nep~ 
tunus, Portunus, Tutunus, Bithynus. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Exagonus, Hexagonus, Telegonus, Epigonus, Erigoims, 
Tosigonus, Antigonus, Laogonus, Chrysogonus, Nebrophonus, 
Aponus^ Carantonus, Santonus, Aiistonus^ Derc^nus. 

o rr s 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Aoiis, Laoiisy Sardoiis, Eoiis, Geloiis, Acheloiis^ looiis, Mi^ 
noiis^ Naupactoiis, Arctoiis, Myrtoiis, 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Hydrochoiis, Aleathoiis; Piritboiis^ Nausithoiis^ Alcinous, 
Spfainoiis^ Antinoiis. • 

APUS EPUS OPUS 

^ Accent the Penultimate^ 

Priapusy Avapos, iBsapus, Messapuis, Athepus, :^Esepus^ 
Ei^ipus, Lycopus, Melanopus, Canopus^ Ino^us, Paropus, 
OropuS; Europus, Asopus, ^sopus, Crotopus. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Sarapus, Astapus, QSdipus^ Agriopus^ .Xropus. 



* Tbe sin^iilar of Morini. See the worcL 

As the t in the foregoing selection has the accent on it, it ought to be proj* 
BiMtticedUke the noon eye; while the nnaccaited t in tiiis selection shoold bt 
proDondced like tf^-i'See Rnk 4tb pve&ced to the /»l^'a< Fm4M(^ 



T 



( 108 ) 
ARUS ERUS IRUS ORUS URUS YRUS 

Accent th^ Penultimate, 

Cimarus, iBs^nis, Iberus, Doberus, Homerus, Severiur, 
Noverus, Meleagrus, CEagrus^ Cynaegirus^ Camirusy f^piruSy 
AchedoruSy Artemidoru$, Isidorus^ Dionysidorus, Theodoras, 
PythodoiJiis, Dipdoms, Tryphiodoras, Heliodoms, Asclepi- 
odoms, Athesiodorusy Gassiodorus, Apollodoras^ Demodoms, 
Hermodoni^, Xenodorus, I/Jetrodoriis, Polydoms, Aloras^ 
EloruSy HelpraSy Pelorus, M^morus, Assorus, Cytoras, EpU 
curas, Palinurus, Arcturus, . » s 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

AbamSy Imbaras^ Hypobarus^ Icarus, Pandarus, Pindams^ 
Tyndaras, Tearus, Farfaras, Agaras, Abgartis, Garsaras, 
Opharus, Cantharus, Obiams, Uliarus, Silaras, Gyliaras, 
Tamaras, Absimarus, Comarus, Vindomarus, Tomarus, 
Ismams, Ocinarus, Pinarus, Cinnaras, Absaras, Bassams, 
Deiotarus, Tartams, Eleazaras, Artabnis, Balacras, Cbaradras, 
Cierberus, Belleras, Mermeras, Termems, Hesperus, Craterus, 
Icterus, Anigras, Glaphims, Deborus, Pacorus, St^^ichorus, 
Gorgophoras, Telesphorus, Bosphorus, Phosphorus, Heptapo- 
rus, Euporus, Anxuras, Deipyrus, Zopyms, Leucosyrus, Satyrus, 
Tityrus. 

ASUS ESUS ISUS OSUS USUS YSUS 

Accent the Penultimate, 

Paraasus, Galesus, Halesus, Volesus, Termesus, Theumc- 
sus, Teumesus, Alopeconnesus, Proconnesus, Arcoonesfus, 
Elaphomiesus, Demonesus, Cherronesus, Chersonesus, Arc^eii- 
nesus, Myonnesus, Halonesus, Cephalonesus, Pelopoqn^us, 
Cromyonesus, Lymesus, Marpesus, rntaresus, Alisus, Para(£sus, 
Amisus, Paropaxnisus, Crinisus, Amnisu3, Berosus, Agrosus, 
Ebusus, Amphrysus. 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 

Oribasus, Bubasus, Caucasus, Pedasus, Agasus, Pegasus, 
Tamasus, Harpasiis, Imbrasus, Cerasus, Doiyasus, Vo|[e«u% 
Volog€su9, iEphesiu^ Aliisos, Genu^us^ AmbrysMs, 



( 169 ) ' 

I ATUS ETUS rrUS OTUS UTUS YTUS 

Accent the Penultimate. 

HubicatuSy Baeticatus, Abradatiis, Ambigatus, Viriatus, Elatus, 
PilatuSy fOatugnatus^ Cinciiinatusy Odenatus, Leonatua, Ara^, 
Pytharatus, Demaratas, Acratus, Ceratus, Sceleratus, Serratns, 
I)entatusy Duatus> Torquatus, Febniatiis, Achetus, Polycletus, 
^gletusy MiletuSy Admetus, Tremetus, Diognetus, Dyscinetus, 
Capetus, AgapetuSy lapetus, Acretus, Oretus, Hermaphroditus 
EpaphrodituSy Heraclitus, Munitus, Agapitus, Ceititus, Bituitus, 
Polygnotus, Azotus^ Acutus, Stercutus, Corautus, Cocytus, 
Berytus. 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 

peodatusy PalsephatuiSy Inatus^ Acratus, Dinocratus, Eche- 
stratus'*^, AmestratuSy Menestratus, Amphistratus, Callistratus, 
Damasistratus, Erasisti'atus, Agesistratus, Hegesistratus, Pisi- 
stratus, SosistratuSy Lysistratus, Nicostratus, Cleostratus, Pa- 
niostratuSy Demostratus, Sostratus, Philostratus, Dinostratus, 
HerostratuSy Eratostratus, Polystratus, Acrotatus, Taygetus, 
DemasoetuSy lapetus, TacituS| Iphitus, Onomacritus, Agora- 
critus^ OnesicrituSy Cleocritus, Damocritus, Democritus, Aris- 
tocritusy Antidotusf; Theodotus, Xenodotus, Herodotus, Cephi- 
^odotus, libanotus, Leuconotus, Euronptus, Agesimbrotus, 
Stesimbrotus, Thepmbrotus, Cleon^brotus, Hippolytus, AnytuSj 
^pytus, Eurytus. 

Avus Evus ivus uus xus Yus zug xys V 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Agavus, Timavus, San^vus, Batavusf, Versevus, Siievui, 
jGradivus, Ar^ymj Briaxus, Oaxus, Araxus, Eudoxus^ Tni{>ezuS| 
Charaxys. 

Accent the Antepenultimate^ 
Bataviu, Inuus, Fatuus, Tifyus, Di{|£fcoridu. 



* All words ending in gtraJtu* have tiie accent pn tiie antepenultimate syllable. 

t This word is pronmmced with the accent dther on the peniiltiniate or an* 
tepenuHiniate syllable ; the fbraier, h^wcycr, is the most senepl, eipeciallv 
^ng te po^tif 



( 170 ) 

DAX LAX NAX RIX DOX ROX 

Accent the Pentdtimate. 
Ambrodax, Demonax, Hipponax. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. . 

ArctophylaXy H^esianax, Hermesidnax, Lysianax, Astjanax^ 
Agonax, Hieraxy Cffitobrix, Eporedorix, Deudorix, Ambiorix,^ 
Domnorix, Adiatorix, Orgetorix^ Biturix^ Cappadox^ AUobrox* 



j^BBOtssaamemmmmmmfi 



RULES 



lOR THE 



PRONUNCIATION 



01 



SCRIPTURE PROPER JVJMES. 



( 17« ) 



JDVERTISEMEJ^r. 



X HE true pronunciation of the Hebrew language, a« Doctor Lowth obtcnres,. 
18 lost. To refer ns for assistance to the Masoretic points would be to launch 
us on a sea without shore or bottom : the only compass by which we can pos* 
tibly steer on this boundless ocean is the Septuagint version of the Hebrew' 
Bible ; and as it is highly probable the translators transfused the sound of the 
Hebrew proper names into the Greek, it gives us something like a clew to 
guide us out of the labyrinth. But even here we are often left to guess our 
way: 'for the Greek word is frequeiiftly so different from tiie Hebrew, as 
icarcely to leave any traces of similitude between them. In this case custom 
and analogy must often decide, and the ear must sometimes solve the difficulty^ 
But these difficulties relate chiefly to the accentuation of Hebrew words : juid 
the method adopted in this point will be seen in its proper place. 

I must here acknowledge my obligations to a very learned and useful work 
^^tfae Scripture Lexicon of Mr. Oliver. As the first attempt to fiicilitate the 
pronunciation of Hebrew proper names, by diyiding them mto syllables^ \t d«> 
serves the highest praise : but as I have often differed widely from this gen* 
tleman in syllabication, accentuation, and the sound of the vowels, I have 
thought it necessary to give niy reasons for this difference, which will be seen 
under the Rules : of the valiclity of which reasons the reader will be the best 
judge, 

N. B. As there are many Greek and Latin proper names in Scripture, pam 
Ocularly 4n the New Testament, which are to be met with in ancient histoiy,^ 
fome of them have been omitted in this selection : and tjierefore if the inspector 
does not find them here, he is desired to ae^ for them ip the Voca-bvUi^ «f 
^reek and Latin Namea. 



RULES 

FOR PRONOUNCING 

SCRIPTURE PROPER JfAMES. 



1. In the pronunciation of the letters of the Hebrew proper 
names, we find nearly the same rules prevail as in those of 
Greek and Latin. Where the vowels end a syllable with the 
accent on it, they have their long open sound, as ^a! half Jd hup 
Si' rack, Go'shen, and Ti/bal. (See Rule 1st prefixed to the 
Gredc and Latin Proper Names.) 

2. When a consonant ends the syllable, the preceding vowel 
IS short, as 5am' ti-eZ, Lem'u-el, Simfe-on, Sofo-mon, Sui/coth, 
Syn'a-gogue. (See Rule 2d prefixed to the Greek and Latii» 
Proper Names.) I here difier widely from Mr. Oliver; for I 
cannot s^ee with him that the e in Abdiel, die o in Jlmon, and 
the u in Jlshur, are to be pronounced like the ee in seen ; the • ia 
tone, and the t£ in tune, which is the rule he lays dpwn for aU 
iimilar words. 

5. Every final i forming a distinct syllable, though unaccented, 
has the long open sound, as A'i, A-rii a-i. (See Rule the 4tb 
prefixed to the Greek and Latin Proper names.) 

4. Every unaccented i ending a syllable, not final, is pro* 
nounced like e, as A' ri-el, Ab'di-el; pronounced A' re-el, 
AV de-el, (See Rule the 4th prefixed to the Greek and Latia 
Proper Names.) 

5. The vowels ai are sometimes pronounced in one syllable, 
tnd sometimes in two. As the Septuagint version is our chief 
guide in the pronunciation of Hebrew proper nam^, it may be 
observed, that when these letters are pronounced as a diphthoi^ 
in one syllable^ like our English diphthong in the word daily, 
Aey are either a diphthong in the Greek word, or expressed by 
die Greek f or i, as Ben-ai' ah, Bay«U ; Hvtshai, Xna) ; Hvlrai, 
Ov^i, 8cc. ; and that when they are pronounced in two syllables, 
as Shamfma-i, ShaM a-i, Ber-a-i'ah, it is because the Greek 
words by which they are translated, as ZafAoi^ XtcUy Bx^fa, 
make two syllables of these vowels. Mr. Oliver has not always 



174 tvtzs rot TOdNou!fciN<i 

attetided to this distinction: he makes Sin' a^i tliree syllables^ 
though the Greek make it but two in £iy». That accurate, 
prosodist Labbe, indeed, makes it a trissyllable ; but he does 
the same by Aaron and Canaan^ which our great classic Milton 
unybrmly reduces to two syllables, as well as SinaL If we wero 
to pronounce it in three syllables, we must necessarily make the 
first syllable short, as in ShMe-i; but this is so contrary to the 
best usage, that it amounts to a proof that it ought to be pro-> 
nounced in two syllables, with the first i long, as in Shi-nar. 
This, however, must be looked upon as a general rule only: 
these vowels in Isaiah, Gra^ised by 'HtraVa?, are always pro- 
nounced as a diphthong, or, at least, with the accent on] the a, 
and the i like y articulating the succeeding vowel ; in Caiaphas 
likewise the ai is pronounced like a diphdtong, though divided 
in the Greek KaV«^(»(; which division cannot take place in 
this word, because the i must then necessarily have the accent, 
and must be pronounced as in Isaac, as Mr. Oliver has marked 
it ; but I think contrary to universal usage. The only point ne- 
cessary to be Observed in the sound of this diphthong is, the slight 
difference we perceive between its medial and final position ^ 
when it is final, it is exactly like the English ay without the ac- 
cent> as in holy day, roundelay, galloway ; but when it is in the 
middle of a word, and followed by a -vowel, the i is pronounced 
as if it were y, and as if this y articulated the succeeding vowel : 
thus Ben-<ti' ah is pronounced as if written Ben-a'yah. 

6. Ch is pronounced like k, as Chebar, Chemosh, Enoch, &c. 
pronounced Kebar, Kemosh, Fmock, &c. Cherubim and Rachel, 
seem to be perfectly anglicised, as the ch in these words is always 
heard as in the English words cheer, child, riches, &c. (See 
Rule 12 prefixed to the Greek and Latin -Proper Names.) Thft 
same may be observed of Cherub, signifying an order oif angels ; 
but when it means a city of the Babylonish einpire, it ought to 
be pronounced X/ rub. 

7. Almost the only difference in the pronunciation of the 
Hebrew, and the Greek and Latin proper names, is in the sound 
of ^e g before e and i : in the two last languagea this consonant it 
always K>ft before these vovrels, w Gellius, Gippius, &c.^ pro- 



$CRl]5TtJB^E PKOPEU NAMES. I7S 

ftcMinced Jellius, Jippius, 8cc. ; and in the first, it is hard ; 93 
Gera, Gerizim, Gideon, Gilgaly Megiddo, Megiddon, &c. This 
difference is without all foundation in etymology; for both g 
and c were always hard in the Greek and Latin languages, as 
well as in the Hebrew , but the latter language being studied so 
much less than the Greek and Latin, it has not undergone Aat 
change which famiUarity is sure to produce in all languages: 
and even the solemn distance of this language has not been able 
to keep the letter c from sliding into s before e aud i, in the 
«ame manner as in the Greek and Latin: thus, though Gehdzi^ 
Gideon, 8cc. have the g hard, Cedrom, Cedron, Cisai, and Cittern, 
have the c soft, as if written Sedrom, Sedron, &c. The same may 
be observed of Igeabarim, Igeal, Nagge, Skage, Pagirf, with theg 
hard ; and Oddelus, Ocina, and Pharacion, vnth the c soft like Sm 

8. Gentiles, as they are called, ending in ines and ites, as 
Philistines, Hivites, Hittites, &c. being anglicised in the trans- 
ition of the Bible, are pronounced like formatives of our own^ 
as Philistins, Whitfieldites, Jacobites, &c. 

9. Hie unaccented termination ah, so frequent in Hebrew 
proper names, ought to be prcHiounced like the 'a m father. The 
u in this termination, however, frequently falls into the indis- 
tinct sQund heard in the final a in Africa, Mtna, &c. ; nor can 
we easily perceive any distinction in this respect between Elijah 
and EUsha: but die final h preserves the other vowels open, as 
Colhozeh, Shiloh, 8cc. pronounced Colhozee, Shilo, 8cc. (See 
Rute 7 prefixed to the Greek and Latin Proper Names.) The 
diphthong ei is always pronounced like ee: dius Sa-mei^m 19 
pronounced is if vmtten Sa-^meff us. But if the accent be on the 
uk, then the a ought to be pronoimced like the a in father; as 
Tah' e-ra, Tah'pe-nes, &c. 

10. It may be remarked, ,that there are several Hebrew pro- 
per names which, by passing through die Greek of the New 
Testament, have conformed to the Greek pronunciation ; such as 
Aceldama, Genazareth, Bethphage, &c. pronounced Aseldama, 
Jenazareth, Bethphaje, &c. This is, in my opinion, more 
Agreeable to the general analogy of pronouncii^ these Hebrew-* 
Greek words than preserving the c and g hard. 



17^ XULeI FOk FRONOUHCIKO 

Bjules fdr ascertaining the English Quantity of the Vowels iri 

Hebrew Proper Names, 

11. With respect to die quantity of the first vowel in dissjl'^- 
lables, with but one consonant in the middle, I have followed the 
rule which we observe in the pronunciation of such dissyllables 
when Greek or Latin words. (See Rule 18 prefixed to the 
Greek a^d Latin Proper Names :) and that is, to place the ac* 
cent on the first vowel, and to pronounce that vowel long, as 
Ko'rah, and not Kor^ ah. Mo' loch and not Mol'och, as Mr. Oliver 
has divided them in opposition both to analogy and the best 
usage. I have observed the same analogy in the penultimate of 
polysyllables ; an^ have not divided Balthasar into Bal-thasf ar^ 
is Mr. Oliver has done, but into BaUtha' sar. 

12. In the same manner, when the accent is on the antepe- 
nultimate syllable, whether the vowel end the syllable, or be fol* 
lowed by two consonants, the vowel is always short, except fol« 
lowed by two vowels, as in Gieek and Latin proper names. ' 
(See Rule prefixed to these names, Nos. 18, 19i 20, 8cc.) 
Thus Jehosaphat has the accent on the antepenultimate sylla- 
ble, according to Greek accentuation by quantity, (see Intro- 
duction to this work) and this syllable, according to the clearest 
analogy of English pronunciation, is short, as if spelt Je-^os^ a^ 
phat. The secondary accent has the same shortening power ia 

Othonias, where the primary accent is on the third, and jthe se- 
condary on the first syllable, as if spelt Oth-o-ni' as: and it is oa 
these two fundamental principles of our own pronunciation^ 
namely, the lengthening power of the penultimate, and the 
shortening power of the antepenultimate accent, that I hope I 
have been enabled to regulate and fix many of those sounds which 
were floating about in uncertainty ; and which, for want of this 
guide, are differently marked by different orthoepbts, and often 
differently by the same orthoepist. See this fully explained and 
exemplified in Principles of English Pronunciation prefixed to the 
Critical Pronouncing Dictionary, Nos. 547, 530, &c. 

Rules for placing the Accent on Hebrew- Proper Names. 
IS. With respect to the accent of Hebrew words, it cannot 
be better regulated than by the laws of the Greek language. . I 



ScitipTUBE PEOPER NAMES. 177 

do not meaii^ however, that every H«brew word which is Gr^ 
cised by the Septuagint should be accented exactly according to 
tke Greek nile of* accentuation : for if this were the case, every 
word enc&ng in el would never have the accent higher than' &e 
preceding syllable ; because it was a general rule in the Greek 
language, that when the' la^t syllable was long the accent could 
not be higher than the penultimate : nay, strictly speaking, were 
-We to accent these words according to the accent of that language, 
.they ought to have the accent on the last syllable, because aC}iiiA' 
and i^^anx, Abdiel and Israel^ have the accent, on that syllable. 
It may be said, that this accent on the last syllable is the grave, 
which, when on the last word of a sentence, or succeeded by an 
enclitic, was changed into an acute. But here, as in words 
purely Greek, we find the LaOdn analogy prevail; and because 
the penultimate is short, the accent is ptacied on thk Antepenul- 
timate, in thesanle liianner as in SocrateSy Sosthenes, Sec, though 
the final syllable of the Greek words t9i%^ann<i<, rartrdir)}; , 8cc., is 
long, and the Greek accent on the penultimate. (See Introduc- 
tion prefixed to the Rules for pronouncing Greek and Latin 
Proper Names.) It il this general prevalence of accentmg 
according to the Latin analogy that has induced m^, when the 
Hebrew word has been Grsecised in the same number of 
syllables, to prefer the Latin accentuation to what may be caUed 
our own. Thus Cathua, coining to us through the Gfreek' 
K«d«», I have accented it on the penultimate, because the 
Latins would have placed the accent on this syllable on account 
of its beii^ tong, though an English ear would be better pleased 
with the antepenultinaate accent. The same reason has induced 
me to accent Chaseba on the antepenultimate, because it is 
Grsteised into XaatSci, But when the Hebrew and Greek word 
does not contain the same number of syllables, as Me^o-bahj 
MictjdCU, Id'u-ely litrnix^ it then comes under our own analogy, 
and ;we neglect the long vowel, and place the accent on 
the antepenultimate. The same may be observed of Mordecau 

from Ma^co^moq, 

14* As we never accent a proper name from the Greek on the 

N^ 



178 Rutins yOJl PRONOUNCING 

last syllaW^, (not because the Greeks did not accent the las 
syllable, for they had many words accented in that manner, but 
because this accentuation was contrary to the Latin prosody :) so 
if the Greek word be accented on any other syllable, wc seldom 
pay any regard to it, unless it coincide with the Latin accent. 
Thus in the word Gedefrah I have placed the accent on the pe- 
nultimate, because it is Grsecised by T»^^ei^ where the accent is 
on the antepenultimate ; and this because the penultimate is long, 
apd this long penultimate has always the accent in Latip. (Se^ 
this farther exemplified, Rule 18, prefixed to the Greek and 
Latin Proper Names, and Introduction near the end.) Thus 
though It may seem at first sight absurd to deriye our pronunci- 
ation of Hebrew words from the Greek, and then to desert the 
(5reek for the Latin; yet since we must hiive some rule, and, if 
possible, a Jieamed one, it is very natural to lay hold of the 
Latin, because it is nearest at hand. For as language is a piix* 
ture of reasoning and convenience, if the true reason lie too 
rteipote from common apprehension, another more obvious one is 
generally adopted; and this last, by general usage, becomes a 
rule superi(H* to the fon»er. It is true the analogy of our own 
lai^uage would be a rule the most rational ; but while t)ie ana- 
logies of our own language are so little understood, and the Greek 
and Latin laiiguages are so justly admired, even the appearance 
of beii^ acquainted with them will always be esteemed reputable^ 
and infallibly lead as to an imitation of them, even ins ich points 
as are not only insignificant in themselves, but inconsistent with 
our velrnaculiu' pronunciation. 

\5. It is remarkable that all words ending in ias and iah hav^ 
the accent* on the t, without any foundation in the analogy of 
Greek and Latin pronunciation, except the very vague reason 
that the Greek w6rd places the accent on this syllable. I call t)ij# 
reason Tague, because the Greek accent has no influence on 
words in ad, iel, ial, See, as lo'^ftnx, AffiinX, BiTimiA, x. t. a. 

HeQce v^e may conclude the iippropriety of pronounciiig 
ATe^ridff with the accent on the first syllable according to* Labb^, 
who 99^ veQ fpyst pronounce it in this manner^ if we wish t# 



SCRIPTURE PROPER NAMES. 179 

pronounce it like the French vnih the os rotundum etfacundun}: 
and, indeed, > if the i were to be pronounced in the French man- 
ner like e, placing the accent on the first syllable seenis to have 
the bolder sound. This may serve as an answ^er to the learned 
critic, the editor of Labbe, who says, " the Greeks, but not the 
French, pronounce ore rotundo T' for though the Greeks might 
place the accent on the i in Mio-o-ia;, yet as, they certainly pro- 
nounced this vowel as the French do, it must have the saine 
slender sound, and the accent on the first syllable mifst, in that 
respect, be preferable to it ; for the Greek ?', like the same letter 
' in t^tin, was the slenderest of all the vowel somids. It i^ t)ie 
broad diphthongal sound of the English i vvith the accent on it 
which makes this word sound so much better in English than it 
does in French, or even in the true ancient Greek pronunciation. 

16. The termination aim seems to attract the accent on the a, 
only in words of more than three syllables, as EpKra-im and 
Mi/ra-im have the accent on the antepenultimate; but Ho'-ro^ 
na'im,' Ram^-thc^ im, &c., on the penultimate syllable Tliis is , 
a general rule^ but if the Greek word has the penultimate 
long, the accent ought to be on that syllable, as Phar-va'im, 

^x^aifAy &C. 

17. Kemuel, Jemuel, Nemuel, and other words of the same 
form, having the same number of syllables as the Greek wpf<^ 
into which they are translated, ought to have the accent on the 
penultimate, as that syllable is long in Greek ; but JEmqni^el, 
Samuel, and Lemuel, are irrecoverably fixed in die antepenuiti 
mate accentuation, and show the true analogy of the accentuation 
of our own language. 

18. Tlius we see what has been observed of the tendency of 
Greek and Latin words to desert their original accent,^ and to 
adopt that of the English, is much more observable in i^ordf 
from the Hebrew. Greek and Latin words are fished in theiy 
pronunpiation, by a thousand books written expressly upon Hf^p 
subject, and ten thousand occasions of using them ; but Hebr^^ 
words, from the remote anticjuity of the laiiguage, from the pwr 
city of books in it, from its being priginally wrijtcp ^1^91^ 



180 RULES FOR PRONOUNCING SCRIPTURE PROPER NAMES. 

points, and the very different style of its poetry from that Of 
other languages^ afford us scarcely any criterion to recur to for 
settling their pronunciation, which must therefore often be irre- 
gular and desultory. The Septuagint, indeed, gives us some 
light, and is the only star by jwhich we can steer ; but this is so 
frequently obscured, as to leave us in the dark, and to force us 
to pronoutice according to the analogy of our own language. It 
^ere to be vanished, indeed, that this were to be entirely adopted 
in Hebrew words, where we have so Httle to determine us ; and 
that those words which we have worn into our own pronunciation 
were to be a rule for all others of the same form and termina- 
tion ; but it is easier to bring about a revolution in kingdoms 
than in languages. Men of learning will always form a sort of 
literary aristocracy ; they will be proud of the distinction which a 
knowledge of languages gives them above the vulgar, and will be 
fond of showing tliis knowledge, which the vulgar will never fail 
to admire and imitate. 

The best we can do, therefore, is to make a sort of compro- 
mise between this ancient language and our own ; to form a kind 
of compound ratio of Hebrew, Greek, Latin, and English, and 
to let each of diese prevail as usage has permitted them. Thus 
Emanuel, Samuel, Lemuel, which, according to the Latin ana- 
logy and Our own, have the accent on the antepenultimate syllable, 
ought to remain in quiet possession of their present pronunciation, 
notwithstanding the Greek Ejxjx«»yi^, DajxaJjA, Aijxy^X; but 
Elishua, Esdrelon, Gederah, may have the accent on the pe- 
ntiltimatey because the Greek words into which they are trans- 
lated, Ex«rei, Ecr^^ijX^/A, TaU^et, have the penultimate long. If 
this should not appear a satisfactory method of settling the pro- 
nunciation of these words, I must intreat those who dissent from 
it to point out a better : a work of this kind was wanted for ge- 
neral use; it is addressed neither to the learned nor the illiterate, 
but to that large and most respectable part of society who have 
a tmcture of letters, but whose avocations deny them die oppor- 
tunity of cultivating them. To these a work of this kind cannot 
, fail of being useful ; and by its utility to these the author wishes 
to stand or h\\. 



PRONUNCIATION 



OP 



SCRIPTURE PROPER MAMES. 



* y 



INITIAL VOCABULARY, 



%* When a word isjBncceeded by a word printed in Italics, this latter word 
Is merely to spell the former as it ought to be pronouneed. Thus Asfe-fa. is the 
true prpnui^ciation of the preceding word Acf i-pha : and so of the rest. 

*,* The figures annexed to the worlds refer to the rules prefixed to the Voca- 
bulary. Thus the figure (3) after Ab'di refers to Rule the 3d, for the pronunci- 
ation of the final t ; and the figure (5) after A-bitfsa-i refers, to ^ule the 5th, fpr 
the pronunciation of the unaccented at : and so of the rest. 

%* Fo|r tiie quantity of the vowejis indicated by the syllabication, see Nos. 
18 and 19 of the Rules Ut Greek and Latin Proper Names. 



AB 


AB 


AB 




A' A-LAU 

*A'a-roii (5) 
Ab 
Ab'a-cue . 


Ab' a-dah 
A-bad'don 
Ab.a-di'a3(15) 
A-bag'tha 


A'bal 

Ab'a.na(9) 
fAb'a-rim 
Ab' a-roii 


/ 



* Aar&n. — ^This is a word of three syllables in Labbe, who-^ays it is used to 
be pronounctd with the accent pn the penultimate : bul the general pronunci- 
ation of this word in English is in two syllables, with the accent on the first; and 
ftt if written A' r<m. Milton uniformly gives it this syllabication and accent : 
Till by two brethren (those two. brethren call 
Moses and Aaron) sent firom God to claim 
His people firom intfaralment — Par, Latt^ b^ xii. y. 170. 

t iitoiM.-^This and some other words are decided jo their accentuation by 
Milton in liiefoDowiDg verses: 
. 3 



182 



AB 



AB 



AC 



Ab'ba(9) 

Ab'da 

Ab'di (3) 

Ab-di'as(l5) 

Ab'di-el(4)(13) 

Ab' don 

A-bed' ne-go 

A'bel(l) 

A'bel Beth-ma' a-cah 

A'belMa'im 

A'belMe-ho'lath 

A'belMis'ra-im (16) 

A'belShit'tim 

Ab'e-san(ll) . 

AVe-sar(13) 

A'bez 

Ab'ga-nis(12) 

A'bi(3) 

A-bi'a, orA-bi'ah 

A-bi-al'bon (12) 

A-bi' a-saph 

A-bi' a-thar 

A' bib 

A.bi'dah(9) 
Ab'i-dan 



A'bi-el(4)(12) 

A-bi-e'zer(12) 

A-bi-ez'rite 

Ab'i-gail 

Ab' i'gal 

Ab-i-ha'il 

A-bi'hu 

A-bi'hud 

A-bi'jah (9) 

A-bi'jam 

Ab-i-le' ne 

A-bim'a.el(13) 

A-bim'e-lecH (6) 

A-bin'a-dab 

A-bin'p-am 

A-bi'ram 

A-bi'rom 

A-bis'a-i (5) 

Ab-i-se' i 

Ab'i-shag 

A-bisb'a-i(5) 

A-bish'a-har 

A-bish'a-loiri 

Abish'u-a (ISf) 

Ab'i-shur 



Ab'i-sum 
Ab'i-tal 
Ab' i-tub 
A-bi' ud 
Ab'ner 
*A'bram, or 

A'bra-hani 
Ab'sa-lom 

A-bu' bus, 
Ac' cad 
Ac'a-ron 
Ac' a-taq 
Ac' ca-roQ ' 
Ac'cho (6) 
Ac' cos 
Ac' coz 

A-cel' da-ma (10) 
A'Sefda-md 
A'chab(6) 
A' chad 
A-cha' i-a (5) 
A-cha' i-chul 
A^chaii(6) 
A' char 
A'chaz((S) 



From Aroar to Nebo, and the wild 
Of tonthmost Akwrim in Hesebon, 
And Horonaini, Seon's realm, beyond 
The flow'ry dale of Sibma dad with vinesy 

And ElcaI6 to th* Asphaltic pool. Poc^Lm^^ b. i. y. 407. 

• Yet his temple high '4 



Rear'd in Azotns, dreaded through the coast 
Of Palestine, in Gath and Asealon, 
And AecaTOHpsi<di Gaza's frontier bounds. 



-/&.463. 



* Ahram^ or ilfrroAam.— The first name of two syllables wai fte patriareh'Si 
miginal name, bot God increased it to the second, of three syllables, af a pledge) 
of an increase in blessing. The latter name, ltioWe?er, fmin the feebleness of 
the h in our pronunciation of it, and firom Hie absence of Ae accent, is liable 
to such an hiatus, from ibe proximity tii two iomilair vowels, thai hi the most 
iokjnii pronunciation we s^eldom hear ^ iuBie eitt^ntf^d to three syllaUes. 
fiiilton has but once pronounced it m this maaner, but htt sbt tim^ made it 
only two syllabltti : and tins lOay be looked npon as the gjenenl primanciationt 



i^ 



AP 



Ad 



Ait 



1*3 



Ach'bor 
A-chi-ach'ii-itis 
A'chim(6) 
A-chim'e-Iech ( ) 
A'chi-or 

A'chish 
Ach' i-idb, or 
Actf i-tub 
A-chit'o-^>Hel 
A-kif o-^et 
Ach'me-ttia 
A'chor 

Ach'sa<9) 
Ach' shaph 
Ach'zib(6) 
Ac'i-phai 
McfaO) 

A-cu'a(l5) 

A'ctib(n) 

A'da 

A'dad 

A^ a-dai, or 

^d'anlah (9) 

AA-ad-e'zcF 

Ad'ad-rim^dibn 

A'dah 

Ad-a-i'ah (9) (l5) 

Ad-a-irsi (1.^) 

Ad' am 

Ad'a-ma, ot 

Ad^a-mah 

Ad'a-irii($) 

Ad'a-mi Ne'ieb 

A'dar(l) 



Ad' a-sa (9) 
Ad'a-tha (^) 
Acrt>e-a(13) 
Ad'dan 
Ad'dar 
Ad'di<3) • 
Ad" din 
Ad' do 
Ad'dus 
A^der(l) 
Ad' i-da 
A'di-el(13) 
A'din 

Ad'i.naO) 

Ad'i^no 

Ad'i-nus 

Ad'i-tha (&) 

Adf-i-tha'im (l6) 

Ad'la.lX5) 

Ad'mah 

Ad' ma-tha 

Ad'na (9^ 

Ad' hah (9) 

*Ad'o.nai(5) 

Ad-o-nrsis (15) 

A-do-ni-be'zek 

Ad-o-ni'jaK(l5) 

A-don'i-kam 

A-don-i'ram 

A-don-i-ze'defc 

A-do'ra(9) 
Ad-o-ra^im (16) 
A-do'ram 
A-dram' e-lech 
A'dri-a(2)(y)(12) 



A-du'el(ji) 

A-dul'lam 

A-dum' ifiini 

A-e-di'as (15) 

iE'gypi 

iE-ne'as.— \ 

-S'ne-as. — Acte Q. 

M'nm 

iE'nos 

Ag' a-ba 

Ag'a-bus 

A'gag(l)(ll) 

A'gag-ite 

A'gar 

Ag-a-rehesf 

Ag'«-e (7) 

Ag-ge'us(7) 
Ag-noth-ta' bc^ 
A'gur 
A^hab 

A-^har-ah (9) 
A-har'al 

A-Wa4(5) 
A-fias-ii-e' nii 
A-ha'va 
A^haz 

A-haz'a-i (5) 
, A-!ia-Ei' A (15) 
Ah'ban 
A'hei- 
A'hi(i) 
Ahi'di 
A-hi'am 
A-hine^zer 
A-hi'hud 



/ 



A'dri-el(l3) A-hi'jah 



* Admm. — ^Laf>b6^ says his editdf, vdsMM ^ a word of three svUableB 
pnly; which, If otice kddiitted, why, says he, ^oald he dissolve the Hebrew 
diphttoiigiii Sadm^ $ffiat, Tolmat,.£cc.,and at thesaniie time make two sy11^l>lts 
of the dipftfiaU in Cisleu, i^hich are cdmiJnoniy dUtecl iiiio one^ jb lUs. WS 
)9e, be M iiic^t&i i^ftt {imiiem-^ 



),84 



M 



W 



A.hi'taii, 


Ai'ia-lon 
Aaja-Ion 
Aije-lelh Sha'har 


A.hi'luii 


A-hiln'B-az 


A-hi'nim 


Aitje-lah ■ 


A-him'«Jecli 


A'in (3) 


AhUt-kk 


A-i'oUi 


A-hi'moth 


A-i'nia 


A-hin'a-dab- 


Ak'lnb 


A-hin'o-am 


Ak-iab'bim 


A-hi'o 


A-lam'e-lech (6) 


A-hi'r.(9) 


Afa-meth 


A-hi'r^m 


Al'a-moth 


Ahi'ramites(8) 


Al'ci-mra 


A-hia'a-mach (6) 


Al'e-ma 


A-hish's-hur 


A-le'meth 


A-hi'.hiim 


Al-ex-an'dria 


A-hi'ihar 


Al-ex-an'dri-on 


A-hi't.b 


Al-le-lii'j»h 


A-hit'o-phel 


Jl-k-lu' yah (5) 


A-hFtub 


A-li-ah 


A-hi'nd 


A-K'ao 


Ah'lah 


Al'lom 


Ah'hi (S) 


AlMon Bac-huth 


A-ho-c, or A-ho'nh 


Al-mo'dad 


A-ho'ile (8) 


AKmon, Dib-Ia- 


A-ho'lJi 


tha'im(15) 


A-hol'bn 


Al'na-than 


A-hol'bah 


A'loth 


A-ho'li-.b 


Al'pha 


A-hol'i-b«h(9) 


AI pbe'ai 


A-ho Ub'a-oih 


Al-U-ne'u! 


AJm'nn.ifS) 


Al trfchith (8) 


A-hu'zim 


Al'te-kon 


A.huz'ziih, 


Al'vuh, or Al'van 


A'i(3) 


A'ludh 


A-i'iih(1.5) 


A' mad 


A-i-atb 


A-mad'a-tha 


A-?j« 
A-rjah 


A-mad'a-thui 


A'md 



AS 

A-mal' da 
Am'a-lek 
Am'a-lelc-ites (8) 

Am' a-na 
Am-a-ri'ah (15) 
A-ma'sa 
A-mas' a-J (5) 
Am-a-ahi'ah (15) 
Am- a -the' is 
Am'a-this 
Am-a-zi' a); 
*A' men' 
A' mi (3) 
A-tnin' a-dab 
A-mit'tai (5) 
A-miz'a-tMkd 
Am'mah 
Am-mad' a-di^ 
Am' mi (3) 
Am -miU'i-oi (4) 
Am' mi-el (4) 
Am-mi' hud 
Am-i-shad'da-i i;^;) 
Arn'mOR 
Am' mon-it^ 
Am' DOB 
A'mbk 
A'ipon 

Am'o-rites (8) 
A'mos 
Am' pit-as 
Am' ram 
Am'ram-ites (8) 
Am' ran 
Am' ra-}diel 
Am' a (3) 
A' nab 
An'a.el (U) 



* Jnm.— The only ampk word in tbe UagutKe iriiich tna neceaiaril; titf 
SDCcunre ueenls.— See CriiM Prntmeing DittiaiMrg mder Uie wnd. 



AN 



AJi 



A^ 



195 



A'nah 

An-a-ha'rath 

An-^-i'ah(5)(15) 

A' nak 

An'a-kiois 

An'a-mim 

A-nam'e-kch (6) 

A' nan 

An-a'ni 

An-a-ni'ah (15) 

An-a-ni^as 

A-naii'i-el (15) 

A' nith 

*A-nath' e-ma 

An'a-tholh 

An' drew 

A'nem, or A'nen 

A'ner 

A'ne;? 

A'neth 

An' a-thoth-ite (8) 

A'ni-am 
, A'nim 
An' na (9) 
An' na-a3 
An'nas 

An-nu'us (13) 
A'nus 

An-ti-lib'a-nus 
An' ti-och (6) 
An-ti'o-chis 
Ari-ti'o-chus 
An'ti-pas 



Anrtip'a-tris 

An'ti-pha 

An-to'ni-a 

An-to-thi'jah (15) 

An'toth-ite*(8) 

A' nul^ 

Ap-a-me' a 

Aph-a-ra'im (16) 

A-phar' sath-chites 

A-phar' sites (8) 

A'phek 

A-phe'kah 

A-pher' e-ma 

A-pber' r^ 

A-phi'ah (15) 

Aph'rah 

Aph' ses 

A-poc'a-lypse 

A-poc'^ry-pha 

A-pol'los 

A-pol'ly-on 

A-poVyon 

Ap'pa-im(15) 

Ap' phi-a (3) 

Aph'e-^ 

Ap' phu3 

ApV us 

Aq' ui-Ia 

Ar 

A'ra 

A'rab 

At' a-bah 

Ar-a-bat'ti-ne 



A-ra' bi-a 

A'rad 

A'rad-ite{8) 

Ar' a-du^ 

A'rah (1) 

A' ram 

A'raq 

Ai^a-rat 

A-rau' nail 

Ar' ba, pr A/ ball 

Ai'bal 

Ar-bat'tis 

Ar-bis' la, in Syria 

Ar-bel'la 

Ar'bite(6) 

Ar-bo' nai (6) 

Ar-che-la'us 

Ar-ches'tra-tus 

a/ che-vites (8) 

Ai^chi (3) 

Ar-chi-at^a-roth 

Ar-chip'pus 

Arch'ites (8) 

Ard 

Ar'dath 

Ard' ites (8) 

Ar'doa 

A-re'li(3) 

A-re' iites 

A-re-op'a-gite> (8) 

+A-re-op'a-gus 

A' res 

Ar-e'tas 



* ^no^A^cr.— Thpsc who are not acquainted wfth the profpund researches of 
verbal critics would be astonished to observe what waste of learning has been 
bestowed on this word by Labbe,, in prd^ to show that it oaght to be accented 
on. the antepenol^mate syllable. This prononciatlon has been adopted by 
iplnglish scholars ; though some divines have been heard from the pulpit to give it 
the penultimate accent, which so readily unites it in a trochaic pronunciation 
with MarmuUhOf in the fim Epistle of St. Paul to the Corinthians: « If any 
** inan love not the Lord Jesus Christ, let him be Anaihema maranatha.** 

t Areopagui^^^Tiheni u a strong propensity in English readers of the New 

Testament 



18S 



AR 



AS 



AS 



A-re^us 
Ai^gob 
Ar'grf 
A-rkrari (5) 
A-rid'a-tha 
A-ri'eh (9) 
A'ii-el(4)(I£) 
Ar-i-ma-the'a 
A* ri-och (4) 

A'tTOfBriio) 

Ar-is-to-bu'lus 
Af k' ites 
Ai>4nad-ged' don 
Ar-mi-shad^ a-i 
Ar^mon 
Ar'nan 
Ar'ne-pher 
A/non 
A' rod 

Ar'o-di (3) 

Ar'o-er 

A'rom 



A/ pad, or Ar'phad 

Ar'sa-ces 

Ar-phax'ad 

Ar'te-mas 

Ar' vad 

Ar' vad-ites (8) 

Ar' u-both 

A-rn'mah (13) 

Ai'za 

A^sa 

As-a-di' as 

A8'a-el(13) 

As'a-hel 

As-a-i'ah(5)(15) 

As' a-na 

A' saph 

As'a-phar 

As' a-ra 

A-sar'e-d (13) 

As-a-re'lah 

As-baz'a-reth 

As'ca-lou 



A-se'as 
As-e-bi' a 
A-seb-e-bi'a(15) 
As' e-nath 
A'ser 
A-se' rar 

Asha.bi^afe(l5) 
A'dian 
Ash'be-a 
Ash'bel 
Ash'beWtes (8) 
Ash'dod 

Ash' doth-ites (8) 
Ash' doth Pis' gab 
A'she-an 
Ash' er 
Ash' i-math 
Ash'ke-naz 
Ash'nah 
A'shon 
Ash'pe-naz 
lAsh'ri-el(13) 



X 



Testament to pronouuce tbis wojrd with the accent on the penultimate syllable , 
^md even some foreign scholars have contended that It ought to be so proy 
notmced, from its derivation from "a^e;? ^d^ay, the Doric dialeet for fnyhvy the 
fiwnitain of Mars^ which was on a hill in Athens, rather than from ^A^uq nekyo^^ 
Ifae hill of Mars. But Labbe very justly despises this derivation, and says^ 
that of aH tiie ancient writers npne have said that the Areopagus was derived 
firom a foantain» or iroin a country near to a foontain ; but all have confessed 
iStxaX it came from a: hill, or the summit of a rock^ on which this famous court of 
judicature w^s built. Vossius tiells us, that St. Augnstinje, De Civ. Dei, K x. 
cap. 10, calls this word pitgupi Marfisy the village of Mars^ and tiiat be fell into 
the error becaui^e the Latin word pagw signifies a village or street; but, says 
lie, tiie Greek word signifies a hill^ which, perhaps, was so called fix>ni vayk or 
vnyht (that is, fountain,) because fountains usnaOy take their rise ori hillsi 
Wrong, however, as this derivation may be^ he tdls us it is adopted by no les^ 
idiolars than Beza, Budaeus, and Sigonias. And t^ may fthow as the unc^Y- 
iainty ot etymology in language, and the security of general usage ; but ifi the 
present case both etymology aood usage Conspire to place the acceitt on the an- 
tepenultimate syQable. Agreeably to this fttage, we ifaid th^ p^lPtve tp a play 
oteerve, that-^ — 

T^yt critics are assembled hi the pit^ 
And form vi Areopagw of y^u 



AS 



AT 



A? 



187 



Ash' ta-roth 

Ash' te-moth 

Ash' ta-roth-ites (8) 

A-shu'ath 

Ash'ur 

A-shu'rim (13) 

Ash' ur-ites (8) 

A' si-a 

As-i-bi'as(15) 

A'si-el(lS) 

As'i-pha 

As' ke-lon 

^A8'ma-dai(5) 

As'ma-veth 

A8-mo7de'us 

As-mo-ne' ans 

A/nah 

As-nap'per 

AWphis (6) 

A'som 

As'pa-tha 

As'phigu- 

A»-phar^ a-sus 

As'riHelClSJ 

A8-sa-bi'as(15) 

As-sal'i:mOth 

As-sa-hi'as (15) 



As-si-de' ans 03) 

As'^ir 

As' SOS 

As' tarrodi 

Ash' ta-roth 

As-tar' te 

As' tath 

A-sup' pim 

A-syn'cri-tus 

A' tad 

At'a r^i 

A-tar'ga-ti^ 

At' a^roth 

A'ier 

A'thack 

Ath-a-i'ah(15) 

Ath.a-li'ah(15) 

Aai-a-ri'as(l5) 

Ath-e-no'bi-iis 

Ath'ens 

Ath'lai{5) 

At' roth 

At' tai (5) 

At^ta.li'ap5) 

At-tfaai^a-tes 



A'va 
Av' a-nm 
A'ven 
Au'gi-a(4) 
A' vim 
A' vims 

Avites(8) 
A'vJthI . . 

Au-ra-ni'ti^ 

Au-ra'lius 

Au-te'us 

Az-a-e' lus 

A'ziOi 

A'zal 

A^-a.li'ah(15> 

Az-a-^i'lih (15) 

A-za'phirOQ 

A/a-ra , 

A-2afte41 

Az-a-rir ah (iiO 

Az-a-ri'a8(15)^ 

A'faz 

fA-zafieJ 

Az-a^kh(15) 

Az-ba/iu-rad^ 

Az'buk 

A-z^kah (9) 



* A9miiM. — Mr, OHver has not iiis^rte4 thii wprd, but we lunrt It iii 
IdUtoni: 

O n each wing * 

Uriel and tUphael lus vaunting {o% 

Tlipagh hnge, and in a rock of diamoiid arm*d, 

VmqnulL'd, Adnmdech and Jimadat. 

Pixr^ Lmt., b. ^. ▼. 3^ 

whence we may gness the poet's pi^onnndation of it in three syllables ; titt 
diphthong Bountfing like the ai in dc»ly.-*-^See Hnle ^^ and the words Simd and 
ifdoNoi. 

t A%azH,^TllAi word is not in Mr. Oliver's Lexicon i but Milton makes ise of 
it, and plac^ the accent on the second sylbble : 

-that proud honour cUdm'd 



4x0zi^9A Itti flg^ti a chemb tall^ 



Pwr. Lottj b. i. t. S34. 



188 



AZ 



AZ 



\ 



AZ 



A' zcl 1 


A'zi-el (13) 


Az'ri-kam 




A'zem 


A-zi' za 


A-zu'bah 




Az-e-phu'rith 


Az' ma-vetfa 


A'zur 




A'zer 


Az'mon 


Az'u-ran 




A-ze'ta3 


Az'nothTa'bor 


Az'y-mites 




Az'gad 


A'zor 


Az'zah 




A-zi'a(]5). 


A-zo' tus 


Az'zan 




A-zi' e-i 


Az'ri-el(13) 


lA^'zur 





BA 



BA 



BA 



6aai^9 or Bel 

Ba'al-ah 

Ba' al-ath 

Ba'al-ath Be'er 

Ba'alBe'rith 

Ba'al-le 

Ba'alGacT 

Ba'al Ham' on 

Ba' at Han' an 

Ba' al IJa'zor 

Ba'al Hei^non 

Ba'al.i(a) 

Ba'al-im. — Milton, 

Ba'al-is 

Ba'alMe'on 

Ba'alPe'or 

Ba'al Per'a-zim 

Ba'al Shal'i-sha 

Ba'alTa'mar 

Ba'al Ze'bub 

Ba'alZe'phon 

Ba'a-na 

Ba'a-nafi 

Ba'a-nan 

Ba'a-nath 

Ba-a-ni'as (15) 



I 



Ba'a-ra 

Ba'a-sha (9) 

Ba'a-shah 

Ba.?.8i'ah(15) 

Ba'bel 

Ba'bi(3) 

Bab'y-lon 

Ba'ca 

Bach' rites (8) 

Bac-chu' rus 

Bach' uth-Al' lop 

Ba-go'as 

Bag'o-i(3)(5) 

Ba-ha'nimrite (8) 

Ba-hu' rim 

Ba'jith 

Bak-bak'er 

Bak'buk 

Bak-buk.i'ah(15) 

Ba' la-am (16) 

*Ba!lam 

Bal'a-dan 

Ba'lah(9) 
Ba'lak 
B^d'a-mo 
Bal'ti-nus 



Bal-th^'sar ( 1 1) 
Ba' mah 
Ba' moth 
Ba'mothBa'al 
Ban 

Ba'ni(3) 
Ba' nid 

Ban-a-^'as (15) 
Ban^nu^ 
Ban' u-BS 
Ba-rab' bas 
Bar'a-chel (6) 

Bar-«-chi'ah(15) 

Bar-a-chi'as 

Ba' rak , 

Bar-ce' nor 

Bar' go 

Bar-hu' mites (8) 

Ba-ri'ah(15) 

Bar-je' sus 

Bar-jo' na 

Bar'kos 

Bar'na-bas 

Ba-ro' dis 

Bar'3a-ba9 

Bai^ta-cus 



^e Coxmtiii^ ^V^ *>^<^ /traWf 



Bar-thoK o-mew 
Bar-ti-me' us 
Ba'ruch(6) 
Bar^la-i (5) 
Bas' ca-ma 
Ba'sbaQ, or 
Bas' san 
Ba'sban Ha'voth - 

Fa'ir 
Ba^'e-math ■ 
Bas'lith 
Bas' math 
Bas'sa 
Bas'ta-i (5) 
Bat'a-ne 
Batb 

Badi's-loth 
Bath-rab'bim 
Bath' she-ba 
Ba^'shu-a(13) 
Bav'a-i(5) 
Be-«-Ii'ah (15) 
Be'a-loth 
Be'^ 
Bcb'a-i (5) 
Be' cher 
Be'ker (6) 
Bech-o'rath 
Bed)' ti'leth 
Be' dad 

Bed-a-i'ah(15) 
Be-«l-i' a-da 
Be-el' sa-nis ^ 

Be-el-teth' mus 
Be-el'ze-bub 
Be'er 
Be-e'ra 

Be-e'rah, or Be'ndi 
Be-er-e'lim 
Be-e'ri (3) 
Be-er-la-W i-roi 
Be-«'roth 
Be-e'roih-ites (8) 



. Bi: 

Be-er'she-&a 

Be-esh' te-rah 

Be' he-moth 

Be'kah(9) 

Be' la 

Be'lah 

Be' la-ites (8) 

Bel'e-mua 

Bel'ga-i (5) 

Be'li-aipS) 

Bel'ma-im (IC) 

Bel' men 

Bel-shaz' zer 

Bel-te-aha^zar 

Ben 

Ben-ai' ah (5) 

Ben-am' mi (3) 

Ben-eb'e-ruk 



Ben 



-e-ji 






Ben'ha-dad 

Ben-ha' il 

Ben-ha'nan 

Betfja-min 

Btn'ja-mite (8) 

Bei/^a-mites 

Ben' i>nu 

Ben-u'i(3)(14) 

Be' no 

Be-no' ni (3) 

Ben-zo'hetit 

Be' on 

Be'er 

Be'ra 

Ber'a.*hah(e)C9) 

Ber-a-chl'ah (15) 

Ber-a-i'ah(I5) 

Be-re'a 

Be'red 

Be-riCS) 

Be-ri'ah (15) 

Be' rites (8) 

Be'rith 

Ber-ni'oo 



BE 198 

Be-ni'dach Bal'a- 

dan 
Be'roth , , 
Ber'o-thai(5) 
Be-ro'Aath 
Ber'yl 
Ber-ze']u9 
Be' zai (5) 
Bes-o-dei'ah(9)(15) 
Be'sor 
Be'tah 
Be' ten 
Beth-ab' a-ra 
Beth-ab'a-rah(9) ' 
Beth' a-nath 
Beth' a-nolh 
Beth' a-ny 
Beth' a-ne 
Beth-ar'a-bah (9) 
Beth' a-ram 
Beth-ar' bel 
Belh-a'ven 
Beth-a/ma-vedi 
Beth-ha-ai-me' on 
Beth-ba'ra ' 

' Beth-ba'rah(9) 
Beth' l)a-si (J) 
Belh-bir'e-i (3) 
Beth' car 
Beth-da'.gon 
Bf tli-dib-la-tha' im 
Beth'el 
Beth' el-ite 
Beth-e' mek 
Be'ther 
Beth-ei/da 
Beth-e' zel 
Beth-ga'der 
BetL -ga' mul 
Beth-hac' ce-rim (7) 
Beth-kii]^ sei-ioi 
Betb-Iifl' ran 
Beth-hog' tab (9) 



iga 



BB 



BI 



BU 



Beth-hp^ron 
Belii-jes'i-motii 
Beth-leb' a-oth 
Beth' le-hem 
Beth' le-hem Eph' 

ra-tah 
Beth' le-hem Ju'dah 
Beth'Ie-hein-ite (8) 
Beth-lo'mon 
Beth-ipa^ a-cah (9) 
Beth-ma^ ca^both 
Beth-me'on 
Beth-nim' rah (9) 
Beth'O'ron 
Betfi-pa'let 
Beth-pa/ zer 
Beth-pe'or 
*Beth'pha-ge (12) 
Beth' fa-je (10) 
Beth^phe-let 
Beth'ra-baii(9) 
Beth'ra-pha (9) 
Beth' re-hob 

Beth-sa'i-da(9) 
Beth' sa-mos 
Bedi' shan 
Beth-she' an 
Beth' she-mesh 
Beth-shit'tah (9) 
Beth' si-mos 
Beth-tap' pu-a 



Beth-su'ra (14) 

Be.thu'el(14) 

Be'diul 

Beth*u-li'a (JS) 

Betii' zor 

Beth' zur 

Be-to' li-us 

Bet-o-mes'tham 

Bet' o-nim 

Be-u'lah 

Be'zai (5) 

Be-zal' e-el 

Be'zek 

Be'zer, or Boz* ra 

Be'zeth 

Bi'a-tas 

Bich'ri(3) (6) 

Bid'kat 

Big'Uia 

Bji'than 

Big' tha-na 

Big' va-i (5) 

Bil'dad 

Bil' e-am 

Bil'gah©) 

BU'ga-i(5) 

Bil' ha, or BU' bah 

Bil'han 

BU'shan 

Bim'hal 

Bin'e-a(9) 



Bin'nu-i(3>(t4) 

Bii^ sha 

Bir' za-vith 

Bish' lam 

Bi-thi'ah (15) 

Bith'ron 

Biz-i.jo-thi'ah^l5) 

Biz-i-jo-thi'jah 

Biz'tha 

Blas'tus 

Bo-a-nef'ges 

Bo'az, or Bo'oz 

Hod cas 

Boch'e-ni(6) 

Bo'chim(6) 

Bo'han 

Bos'cath 

Bo'sor 

Bos' o-ra 

Bos'rah (9) 

Bo'zez 

Boz'rah 

Brig'an-dine 

Buk'ki(3) 

Btik-ki'ah(15) 

Bui rhymeSf dull 

Bu'nah 

Bun'ni(3) 

Buz 

Bu'zi(3) 

Buz'ite(8) 



fi«<A|»A(^.— Tius word u generally pronounced by the iUiterate in two syl- 

Ubiety and Without the second ji^ as if written Beth'yagi, 

it-' 



( 39]t ) 



CA 

Cab 

Cab' boil 

Cab' ham 

Ca' bul.— See Bui. 

Cad'dis 

Ca'des 

Ca' desh 

Cai^a-phas (5) 

Cain 

Ca-i' nan 

Cai'rite8(8) 

Ca'lah 

CaF a-mus 

Cal'cd 

Cat-dees' 

Ca'leb 

Ca'Ieb Eph<ra.tah 

Cal'i-tas 

Cal«a*mol'a-Ius 

Cal'neth 

Cal'no 

Cal'phi(3) 

Cai'va-ry 

CaV va-re 

Ca' ihon 

Ca'na 



CA 

♦Ca'na-an 
Ca'na-an-ites (8) 
Can'nanrUes 
Can'neh(9) 
Can' nee 
Can' veh (9) 
Can' tee 

•f-Ca-pei^na-um (l6) 
Caph-ar*sal' a-ma 
Ca-phen^ a-tha (9) 
Ca-phi'ra (9) 
Caph'tor 
Caph'to-rim 
Caph^to-rims 
Cap-pa-do' ci-a 
Cap-pa-do'she-a 
Car-a-ba' si-on 
Car-a-baf ze-on 
Car' cha-n^s (6) 
Car'che-mbh (6) 
Ca-re^ah (9) 
Ca'ri-^ 
Cai^kas 
Car-ma' ni-^8 
Car' me 
I Car'mel 



Cff 

Car'mel-ite (8) 

Car'mel-i-tess 

Ca/mi(3) 

Cai'mitesXS) 

Car^na-im (15) 

Car'ni-on 

Car' pus 

Car-she' na 

Ca-siph'i-a 

Cas' leu 

Cas'lu-bim 

Cas'phor 

Cas'pis, or 

Ca^ phin 

Ca-thu'a-fh(13) 

Ce[droa{7) 

Cei'lan 

Ce-le-m?a(9) 

Cen'cre-a (6) 

Cen-de-be' us 

Cen-tu'ri-on 

Ce'pha^ 

Ce'ras 

Ce'teb 

Cha' bris (6) 

Cha'dias 



* Canaan.— This word is not iinfrequenfly pronounced in three syllablesy with 
the accent on the second. But Miltdn, who tn his Paradise Lost has intro- 
daced^this word six times, has constantly made it two syllables, with the accent 
on the first. This is perfectly agreeable to the syllabication and accentnatioii 
of Isaac and Bulaamy which are always heard in two syllables. This siqppref- 
sion of a syllable in the latter part of these words arises from the absence of 
accent: an accent on the second syllable wotUd prevent the hiatus arising Irom 
the two vowels, as it docs ia Baal and Baalim, which are always heard in two 
and three syllables respectively.— See A^onai. 



t Cap^numnt.— This word is often, but improperly, pronounced with the ac- 
ces^on the penultimate. 



192 Cii 

Chse're-as 
Ghal' ce-do-rty 
CW col 
Chal-de'a 
Cha'nes 
Chau-Du-iie'iis 
Char~a-ath' a-lar 
Char' a-ca 
Chai^a-sim 
Cbai'cus 
Cha're^ 
Chai'mis 
Char' ran 
Chas'e-ba(13> 
Che' bar (6) 
Ched-er-Ia' o-mer 
Che'lal 
OieF ci-as 
Kel she-ai 
CheI'lub 
Che'Iod 
Che'lub 
Chel'li-ans 
' Chel'Ius 
Che-lu'bai(5) 
Che-lu'bar 
Chem'a-rims 
Che' mosh 
Che-na'a-nah (9) 
■Chen'a-ni(a) 
Clicn-a-ni' ah (15) 
Che' phar Ha-am'- 

mo-nai (5) 
Cheph-i' rah (6) (9) 
Che' ran 
Che' re-as 
CheKeth-ims 
Cher' eth-itea (8) 
Che'rith, or 

CItc'rish 
Chci'ub(6) 



Cl 

CheKu-bim 

Ches' a-loD 

Che'sed 

Che' ail 

Che'sud 

Cbe-suriotb 

Cbel^tim 

Che'zib 

Chi' don 

Chil'le-ab 

Chi-Ii'on 

Chil'mad 

Chim' ham 

Chis'leu, Cas' leii^ 

or Ci/leu 
Otis' Ion 

Chis'lothTa'bor 
Chit'tim 
Chi'im 
Chlo'e 
Cho'ba 
Cho-ra'sin^ or 

Cho-ra' shan, or 

Cho-ra' zin 
Chos-a-me' iia 
Cho-ze'ba 
Christ 
Chub f 6) 
Kuh 
Chun 

Chu'sa, or Chu'^ 
Chusb'aa Riah-a- 

tha'im (15) 
Chu'si 
Ciu'ner-eth, or 

Cis' ner-oth 
Ch'a-ma 
Ci'sai(5) 
els' leu 
Cith'e-ras 
Cit'tims 



CfY 

Clau' da 

Cle-a' sa 

Clem' ent 

Cle' o-pfaas 

Clo'e 

Cni' dus 

Ni'diis 

Col-ho'zeh (9> 

Col'li-us 

Co-las' se 

Co-las' si-ans 

Co-losf^ e-am 

Co-iii'ah(l5> 

Con-o-ni'ah 

Cor 

Cor' be 

CoK ban 

Co' re 

Coi'iDth 

Co<in'tbi-ai» 

Co'sam 

Cou'tha -, 

Coz 

Co/bi (3) 

Cres'ceiu 

Crete 

Cre'tans 

Cretes 

Cre'ti-ans 

Cr^she-ans 

Cu'bit 

Cush 

Cu' slian 

Cu' shan Rish-a- 

tba'im(lj) 
Cu'shi (3) 
Cutfa, or Cuth' ah 
Cu'tbe-ans 
C/ a-mon 
Cy-re'ne 
Cy-re' ni-iu 



( 193 ) 



DA 

Dab'a-reh (9) 
Dab'ba-sheth 
Dab'e-rath 
Da'bri-a 
I>a.co'bi(3) 
Dad-de'us 
Da'gon 
Pai^san (5) 
Dal-a-i' ah (5) 
Dal'i-lah 
Dal-ma-nu'tha 
Dal'phon 
D5n?a-ris 
Dam-a-scienes' 
Dan 

Daii'ites (8) 
Dan-ja^ an 
Dan'i-el(13) 
Dan^nah 
Dan^ o-brath 
Da'ra 
Daf'da 
Da' ri-aa 
Dar'kon 
Da' than 
Dath' e-mahy or 
Dath' mah 



DI 

Da'vid 
De'bir 
*Deb' o-rah 
De-cap' o-lis 
De'dan 
Ded'a^nim 
Ded' a-nims 
De-ha'vites (8) 
De^kar 
Del-a-i'ah (5) 
Del'i-bh 
De'mas 
Der'be 
Des'sau ^ 

De-u'el(17) 
Deu-ter-on'o-my 
Dib'la-im (16) 
Dib'lath 
Di'bon 
Di'bon Gad 
Dib'ri(3) 
Dib'za-hab^ or 

Diz' i'hdiy 
Di' drachm 
IH' dram 
Did'y-mus (6) 
Dik'lah, 6r DU'dah 



DC 

DU'e-an ' 
Dim' ndi 
Di'mon 
Di-mo'nah (9) 
Di'nah (9) 
Di'na-ites (8) 
Din'ha-bah (9) 
Di-ot're-phes 
Di'shan 
Di'shon 
Diz'a-hab 
Do'cnd * 
Dod' a-i (5) 
Dod' a-nim 
-D(5d'a-vah (9) 
Do' do 
Do'eg 

Doph'kah (9) 
Dor 
Do'ra 
Dor'cas 
Doirym'e-ne» 
Do-sith'^e-us 
Po'tha-im, or 

Do'than(l6> 
Du'mah (9) 
Du'ra 



* DeftdraA.— The learned editor of Labbe tells ns, tiiat this word bas the pe- 
nultimate long, both in Ch-eek and Hebrew; and yet he observes that our 
clergy, when reading the Holy Scriptures to the people in English, always pro* 
nounce it with the accent on the first syllable; <^ and why not,*' says h^, ** when 
they place the accent on the first sylkible of wutoff auditor^ and tucceuarT' 
<< But," continues h%, ^^ I suppose they accent them otherwise when they ipalk 
Latin." Who doubts it? ^ 

o 



C 19* > 



EL 

E'a-KA-8 

E'bal 
E'beH 

E-bed' me-lech 
Eb-en-e'zer 
E'ber 
E-bi' a-saph 
E-bro' nah 
E-ca'nus 
EC-bat's na 
' Ec-cle-si-aj^ tes 
Ec-cle-sUas' ti-ciu 
Ed 
E'dar 
E'den 
E'der 
E'des 
E'cli-ar 
Ed'na 
E'dora 

E'dom-ites (8) 
Ed're-i (3) 
Eg'lah 

Eg'la-im 06) 
Eg'lon 
E'gypt 
E'hi (3) 
E'hud 
E'ker 
Ek're-bel 
Ek'ron 

Ek'ron-ites (8) 
E'la 
Ei'a-dah 
E'lab 
E'tain 

E'lam-ites (8) 
£fi>-sahC9) 



E'kfli 


El-i-hs'n a-(5> 


El-belh'el 


El-i-hrfrept 


El'ci-a 


E-li'hu 


Ee,he-a 


E-lTaaOS) 


El'da-ah 


E-irjah (9) 


EI'did 


El'i-la 


E'le-Bd 


E'lim 


E-fcwi'fek (9) ■ 


E-liin'e-lech(6) 


B-Ze-o't— MUlon. 


E-li-ai'iia-i(5) 


E-lC'a-rahO) 


EJi-o'm. 


E-le-a'zer 


El'i-pbal 


E-le-.-zii'ru» 


EJiph'a-lcli(9) 


El-el-o'heln'ra-d 


E!'i-phaz 


E-li/the-nu 


E-liph'e-let 


El-ei»-2.'i(3)(5) 


E-li>'a-betii 


El-Wnm 


El-i-.,!E'u5 


E']i(3) 


E-L'dia(9) 


E-li',b 


E-li'.bah 


E-li'.-il» 


E-lish'a-ma 


E-li'.-ilih 


E-bb'a-mah 


E-lTaJun 


E-liah-a-phal 


E-lTuhO) 


E-lish'e-ba 


E-li'ah-b. (9) 


El-i-sbu'a (13) 


E-li'a-kim 


E-ltfi-mua 


E-ffa-UCS) 


E-U'u 


E-li'am 


E-li'ud 


E-li'a. (15) 


E-liz'a-phaii 


E-li'a-nph 


El-i-ne'in 


E-U'a-iblb 


E-U'zur 


E-li-a-ni 


El'ka-nab 


E-li'a-lha,.ot 


El'ko-.bit.(») 


E-ffa-thah ' 


El'l.^ 


E-U-a'zar 


ET mo-dam 


E-li'dad 


Ernannii 


E'li-el (IS) 


El'na-thaa 


E-li-e'iia-i(5) 


E-km 


E-li-e'jer 


E'lon-itej (8) 


£-li'lia4» 


Flon Belh'ha-n 



' 'r 



EMoth 

EFpa-al 

El'pa-let 

£l-pa^ran 

El'te-keh (9) 

El'te^keth 

Er te-kon 

El'to-lad 

E'lul 

E.lu'za-i(5) 

El-y-ma'is 

EKy-mas 

El'za-bad 

EF za-phan 

Em-al-cu'el (17) 
E'mims 

E.man'u^l(17) 

*Ein' ma-US 

Em'mer 

E' mor 

E'nam 

E'nan 

En' dor 

En-eg4a'im(l6) 

En-e-mes'sar 

E-ne'ni-as 

En-gan'mm 

En'ge-di(7) 

£n-had'dah (d) 

Ea-hak' ko-re 

En-ha'zoT 

En-mbh'pat 

E'noch(6) 

E'nock 



U 



E'nog 

En-rim' mon 
En-ro'gel (IS) 



Ein^ she-mesh * 

En-lap'pu-ah (9) 

Ep'a-phras 

E-paph-ro-di' tus 

E-pen'e-tu3 

E'phah 

E'phai(5) 

E'pher 

E' phes-dam' min 

fiph'lal 

E'phod ^ 

E'phor 

Eph' pha-tha 

E'phra-im (^16) 

E' phra-'im-ites (8) • 

EpVra-tah , 

Eph' rath 

Eph'rath-ites(g) 

E'phron 

Er 

E'rto 

E'ran-ites (8) 

E-ras'tus 

E'rech (6) 

]e'ri(3) 

E'sa 

E-sa'i-as (6) 

E'sar-had'doQ 

E'sau 

Es'dras 

Es-dre'lon(lS) 

Es'e-bou 

E-se'bri-a^ 

E'sek 

Esh'ba-al 

Esh'baH 

Esh'col 

^^she-an 

E'shek 



Et 



105 



Esh' ka-lcta 

Esh'ta-ol 

Esh'tad^lite(f(8) 

Esh-tem'o-a 

Esh' te-moth 

Esh' ton 

Es'U (3) 

£s-ma-chi' ah ( 1 5) 

E-so'ra 

Es'ril 

Es'rom 

Es-^enes' (8) 

Est'ha-ol 

Es'ther 

E'tam 
E'tham 
E'than 
Eth'a-nutf 
Eth'ba-al 
E'ther 
Eth'ma. 
Eth'nan 
Eth'iii (3) 
Eu-as'i-bitf 
£u-bu' lus 
Eve 

E'vi(3) 

E'vil mer^o'dacb 
Eu'na-than 
Eu-ni'ce ' 

Eu-o'di-ais 
Eu-pol'e-mUtf 
Eu-roc'ly-doD 
Eu'ty-chus 
Ex'ordus 
E'zar 

Ez'bani (3) (6) 
,E/bon 



* £mmaiif«— Tbis word if Yeiy iiiiprati«% pronoiiiic«d in two lyllableg aQ H 



196 EZ 

£z-e-ki'as 
E-ze^ki-el (13) 
E'zel 
E'zem 
E'zcr 



EZ 

Ez-e-ri'a8(15) 

E-zyw(15) 

E' zi-on Ge' bar, or 

E' zi-on-ge' ber 
Ez'iiite(8) 
Ez'ra 



EZ 

Ez'ra-hitc(d> 

Ez'ri(S) 

Ez'ri.elClS) 

Ez'ril 

£z^ ron^ or Hez' ron 

Ez'ron-ites (8) 



GA 



r» - 



Ga'ai: 

Ga'ash 

Ga'ba 

Gab'a-el(lS) 

Ga V a-tha 

Gab'bai(5) 

Gab' ba-tha 

Ga'bri-as * 

Ga'brMl(13) 

Gad 

Gacfa-ra 

Gad-a-renes' (8) 

Gad'des 

Gad'di-el (IS) 

Ga'di(3) 

Gad'ites(8) 

Ga'ham 

Ga'har 

Ga'i-us ' 

Ga'yus 

Gal^a-ad 

Ga'lal 

Gal'e.^ 

Gal'ga-la 

GaFi-lee 

Gal' Urn 

Gal'li-o 

Gam'a-el(13) 

Ga-nia'U-el(13) 



GE 

«am'ma*Kiiin8 
Ga'mul 
Gar 
Ga'reb 
Gar' i-zim 
Gar' mites (8) 
Crash' mu 
Ga'tam 
Gatfa 

Gath He' pher ' 
Gath Run' mon 
Gau' Ian 
Gau'lon 
Ga'za 
Gaz' a-bar 
Ga-za'ra 
Ga' zath-ites (8) 
Ga'zer 

Ga-ze'ra(13) 
Ga'zez 
Gaz'ites (8) 
Gaz'zam 

Ge'ba(7) 
Ge'bal 
Ge'bar 
Ge'ber 
Ge'bim 

Ged-a-lKah (15) 
iGed'dur 



GE 

Ge'der 

Genie' rah (14) 

Ged' e-rite (8) 

Ge-de'roth(13) 

Ged-e-roth-a'im (16) 

Ge'dir 

Ge'dor 

Ge.ha'zi(7)(13) 
Gel'i-loth 
Ge-mal'li (3) 
Gem-a-ri'sJi (15) 
Ge-ne'zar(13) 

Ge-ne8'a-redi(7)- 
Gen' e-sis 

Jen'esis 
Gen-ne'us 
Gen-u'bath 
Gen' tiles (8) 
Jen' tiles 
Ge'on 
Ge'ra 
Ge'rah (9) 
Ge'rar 
Ger' a-sa (9) 
Ger'ga-shi (3) 
Ger'ga-shites (8) 
Ger-ge-senes' (8) 
Ger'i-zkn (7) 
Gei^ rin«i-anir 



GI 



GI 



GU 



197 



Ger-rae'ans 
Ger' shorn 
Gcf^ shon 
•*er'shoii-ites (6) 
Ger' shur 
Oe'sem 
Gfe'shan 
Ge' shem 
Gfs'shur 
Gesh'u.ri(S) 
Gesh' u^rites (8) 
Ge'thur 

Geth-o-U'as (15) 
Geth-sem' a-ne 

Ge-u'el(17) 

®e' zer 

Ge' zer-itcs (8) 

Gi'ah 

Gib' bar 

Gib'be-thon 

GibVa (9> 

Gib'e-ah(9) 

Gib' e-ath 

Gib''e-on 

Gib' e-on-ites (8) 

Gib'Ute8(8) 

GidHlal'tiCS) ' 



Gid'del 
Gid^^-ou (7) 
Gid^.o'ni(3) 
Gi'dom 
Gi'er Ea'gle 
Jii er Eagle 
Gi'hon 
Gil'a-lw (5) 
Gil'bo-a 
Gil'e-ad 
Gire-ad-ite (8) 
Gil' gal (7) 
Gi'loh (9) 
Gi' lo-nite (8) 
Gim'zo 
Gi'nadi . 
Gin'ne-tho 
Gin' ne-thon 
GiKga-shi (3) 
Gi/ga-shites C8) 
Gis'pa (9) 
Git' tab He'pher 
Git'ta-im (15) 
Git'tite 
Git'tites (8) 
Git'tith 
Gi'zo-nite (8) 



Gl0de 
Gni'diis 
Ni'dus 
Go'ath 
Gob\ 
Gog 
Go' Ian , 
Gol' go-tha 

Go.li'ah(9) 

Go-li'ath 

Go'mer 

Go-moi^rah 

Go' pher wood 

Gor'gi-as 

Go/je-as 

Gor'ty-na 

Go' shen 

Go-aion'i-el(lS) 
Go'zan ♦ 
Gra'ba 
Gre'ci-a (9) 
Gre^ she-tt 
Gud'go-dah 
Gu'ni (3) 
Gu' nites (8) 
Gur 

Gur-ba'al 



HA 



HA 



HA 



Ha-A-hash'ta-bi 
Ha.bai'ah(5) 
Hab'a-kuk 
Hab-a-zi-ni' ah (15) 
Ha-bei^ge^n . 
Ha'bor 

HachTa4i'ah (15) 
Hach'i-lah 



Hach'mo-ni (3) 
Hach' mo-nite (8) 
Ha' da 
Ha'dad 
Had-ad-e'zer 
Hk'dad Rim' men 
Ha'dar 
Had'anshah 



Ha-das' sa (9) 
Ha-das'sah 
Ha^at' tah (9) 
Ha' did 
Had' la-i (5) 
Ha-do' ram 
Ha'drach(6) 
Ha^b 



198 



HA 



Hag'a-bah{9) 
Hag-a-i (5) 
Ha' gar 

Ha-gar-enes' (8) 
Ha'gar-ites (8) 
Hag'ga-i (5) 
Hag'ge-ri(3) 
Ha^gi(3) 
Hag-gi'ah (15) 
Hag'gites (8) 
Hag'gith 
Ha'i(5) 
Hak'ka-tan 
Hak'koz 
Hak-u'pha(l3) 
Ha'lah (9) 
Ha' lac 
Hal'lul 
Ha'li (3) 
Hal-le-lu'ial) 
Hai-le-li/yah 
Hal-lo'e4r 
Ham 
Ha* man 
Ha' math, or 
He* math 
Ha'math>ite(8) 
Ha' madi Zo' bab 
Ham' math 
Ham-med'a-ilia 
Ham'e-lech(6) 
Ham'irtal 
Ham-mol' e-k^ 
Ham'mon 
Ham'o-uah 
Ha' moD Goff 
Ha'mor ^ 
Ha' moth 
Ha' moth Dor 
Ha-mu'eI(I7) 
Ha' mul 
Ha' mul-ites (S) 
Ha-mu'tal 



HA 

Ha-nam'e-ei (IS) 

Ha' nan 

Ha-naii'eHel(13) 

Han'a-niO) 

Han-a-ni'ah(15) 

Ha'nes 

Hatfi-el (13) 

Han-nah (9) 

Han'na-thon 

Hatfui-eUlS) 

Ha'noch 

Ha'noch-ites (8) 

Ha' nun 

Haph-arra' iro ( 1 d) 

Ha'ra 

Hai'a-dah(9) 

Hai^-B-i'ah(16) 

Ha'rao 

Ha'ra-rite (8) 

H«r>bo'na 

Har-bo'nah 

Ha'reph 

Ha'retfi 

Har'has 

Har'harta(9) 

Hai^hur 

Ha' rim 

Ha'ripb 

Har'ne-pher 

Ha'rod 

Ha'rod-ite (8) 

Har'o-eh (9) 

Ha' ro-rile (8) 

Har'o-sheth 

Har'G^(9) 

Ha' rum 

Ha-ru'maph 

Ha-ni'phite(8) 

Ha'ruz 

Has^^ah (15) 

Has-e-nu'ah (13) 

Hash-arbi' ah (IS) 

Hash-ab'nab^d) 



HE 

Hash-ab-ni'ah'(15) 
Hash-bad' a-nd (9) 
Ha' ahem . 
H^ah-mo' nah (9) 
Ha' ahum 
Ha-8hu'pha(9) 
Has' rah 

Has-se-iia'ah (9) 
Ha-su'pha(9) - 
Ha'Uch (6) 
Ha! lack 
Ha'tbath 
Hafi-ta 
Hat' til 
Hat-ti'pha 
Hat'tuah 
Hav'i-kh (9) 
Ha'voth Ja'ir 
Hau'ran 
Haz'a^(13) 
Ha-zai'ah (5) 
Ha'zar Ad'dar 
Ha'zar E'nan 
Ha' zar Gad' dah 
Ha' zar Haf ti-coQ 
Ha'zar Ma'vetti 
Ha-zi\'ro^ 
Ha' zar Shu' el 
Ha'zar Su' sah 
Ha'zar Su'sim 
Ha'ze]£Upo'm(3) 
Ha-ze' pm 
Haz-^roth 
Ha'zer Shu'sim 
Haz* e-z<on Ta' mar 
Ha'zi-el(13) 
Ha'zo 
Ha'zor 
Haz'u-bah(9) 
Ht/her 

H«'ber-ites(8} 
He' brews' 
He'broR 



RE 

He'brcm-ite8(8) 
Heg-a-i (5) 
He'ge (7) 

He- lam 

Hel'bah<9) 

Hel'bon 

Het-chi'ahCIS) 

Herda-i(5) 

He'leb 

He'Ud 

He^Iek 

He'lek-ites (8) 

He-lem 

He'leph 

He'Ie; 

He-li (3) 

Hel'ka-i{S) 

Hel'kitli 

HBKkalh Haj-m- 

rim 
Hel-ki'as (15) 
Ha' Ion 
He* man 
He' math, ^r 

Ha' math 
Hem'daa ' 
Hag 

He" mi (9) 
Hen'a-dad 
Ha'nodi(e) 
He'pher 
He'phet^ites (8) 
Hepb'zi4Mh (9) 
He^rem 
HCres 
He'redi 
HeKmaa 
Her-mo^e-oes 
Her'moo 
HeHmoiHitea (8) 
Her'od 
He-ro'dMuu 



HO 

He-It/ di-as 

He-ro'di-aa 

He'leb 

He' led 

Hesh'bon 

Hesh' mon 

Heth 

Heth'lon 

Hez'e-l[i(3) 

Hez-e-ki'ah (15) 

He'zer, or He'zir 

He-a'a 

He'zi-on 

Hez'ra-i (5) 

Hez-ro 

Hez'rtm 

Hez' roa-itea (8) 

Hid'da-i(5) 

Hid'de-kel 

Hi'el 

Hi-ei'&«l(13) 

Hi-er'e-moth 

Hi-er-i-e' I us 

Hi-er'mas 

Wis-gai'on (5) 
HFlcn 

Hil-lrfahOi) 
Hil'Iel 
Hin 

Hin'nom 
Hi' rah 
Hi' ram 
Hir-ca'nus 
His-ki'jah (15) 
Hit'titta (8) 
Hi'vitesfg) 
Ho'ba,or 
Ho'bah 
Ho'bab 
Hod 

Hod-a-i'ah (15) 
HodHi-vi'ah(i5) 



HU 199 

Ho'dyi 

Ho-de' va (0) 
Ho-de'vah(9) 
Ho-di'ah(l5) 
Ho-dKiah (15) 
Hog'Iah 
Ho'ham 
Ht/Ien 
Hol-o-£er'iifli 
Ho' Ion 
Ho' man, or 
He'inan 
Ho' mer 
Hoph'ni (3) 
Hoph'rah 
Hor 
Ho' ram 
Ho'reb 
Ho' rem 
HoF'-a-gid' da4 
Ho'ri (3) 
Ho' rims 
Ho' rites (8) 
Hor'mah 
Hor-o-na'im (15) 
Hor'o-nitefl (8) 
Ho' SB, or Ha*' ah 
Ho'San'na 
Ho-se'a (9) 
Ho-z/a 

Hosh-a-i'ah(J5) 
Hosh'a-ma 
Ho-she' a (8) 
Ho' diam 
Ho'thaa 
Ho'thir 
Huk'kok 
Hul 

Hul'dali (ffi 
Hum'tah 
Hu'pham 
Hu'pham-iUg(8) - 
Hup'pah 



£00 HU 



HU 



HY 



Hup^pim 
Hur 

Hu'rai(5) 
Hu' ram 
Hu' ri (3) 
Hu' shah (9) 



Hu' shai (5) 

Hu^sham 

Hn'shath-ite (8) 

Hu^shim 

Hu'shub 

Hu-shu'bah(9) 



Huz 
Hu' zoth 
Huz' zab 
Hy-das' pes 
Hy-e' na (9) 
Hy-men-e'us 



JA 



J 



A'A-KAN 

Ja-ak'o-bah (9) 

Ja-a'la 

Ja-a' lah (9) 

Ja-a' lant 

Ja'a-nai(5) 

Ja-ar-e-or' a-gim 

Ja-as-a-ni'a 

Ja'a-sau 

Ja-a' si-el (IS) 

Ja-a'zah (f ) 

Ja-az-a-ni'sJi (15) 

Ja-a' zar 

Ja-a-zi'ah (15) 

Ja.a'zi-eL(13) 

Ja'bal 

Jab' bok 

Ja'besh 

Ja'bez 

Ja'bin 

Jab'ne-el(13) 

Jab'neh(9) 

Ja'chan 

Ja'cbin 

Ja' chin-ites (8) 

J^'cob 

Ja-cu'bus (id) 

Ja'da 



JA 



Jad-du' a (9) 

Ja'don 

Ja'el 

Ja' gur 

Jah 

Ja-ha'le-el(13) 

Ja-hal' e-lel (13) 

Ja'hath 

Ja' haz 

Ja-ha'za 

Ja-ha'zah (9) 

Ja-ha-zi'ah (15) 

Ja-ha'zi-el (13) 

Jah' da-i (5) 

Jah'di-el(13) 

Jah'do 

Jah'Ie-el 

Jah^e-el-ites (8) 

Jah'ma-i (5) 

Jah'zah(9) 
Jah'ze-el (13) 
Jah'zi-el (13) 
Jah'ze-el-ited (8) 

Jah'ze-rah(9) 

Ja'ir 

Ja' ir-ites (8) 

Ja'i-rus Ja! e^rus 

Ja'kan 



JA 



Ja'keh (9) 

Ja'kim 

Jak'kun 

Ja' Ion 

Jam' bres 

Jam' bri (3) 

James 

Ja' min 

Ja' min«ites (8) 

Jam'lech (6) 

Jam'na-an 

Jam-ni'a (9) 

Jam'nites (8) 

Jan'na (9) 

Jan'nes 

Ja-no' ah (9) . 

Ja-no'hah (9) 

Ja' num 

Ja'phet 

Ja'pheth 

Ja-phi'ah (15) 

Japh' let 

Japh' le-ti (3) 

Ja'pbo 

Jar 

Ja'rah (9) 

Ja'reb 

Ja'red 



\ 



JE 

Jar-e-Bi'ah (15) 

JaKhaO) 

Ja'rib 

Jar'muth 

Ja-ro'ah (9) 

Ja8'ael(13) 

Ja'shem 

Ja' shen 

Ja' sher 

Ja-shc/be-am 

Jash'ub 

Jash'u-bi Le'hem 

Jaah' ub-ites (8) 

Ja'si-el(13) 

Ja-su' bus 

Ja'tal 

Jath'tii-el(l3) 

Jat'tir 

Ja'van 

Ja'zar 

Ja'zer 

Ja'zi-el (13) 

Ja'ziz 

Ib'har " 

Ib'le-am 

Ib-nei' ah (9) 

R-n? jah (9) 

Ib'ri (3), 

IVzan 

Ich'a-bod 

I-co'ni-um 

I<i'a-laii(9) 

Iifbash 

Id'do 

Id'ii-cd(13) 

Id-u-nMe'a(9) 

Id-U'Diffi' ans 

Je'a-nm 

Je-af e-rai (5) 

Je-ber-e-clu'ah(15) 

Je'bus 

Je-Wsi (3) 

Jub'u-*ites(8) 



JE 

Jec-a-mi'ah (15) 

Jec-0-li'ah{15) 

Jec-o-ni'ah(15) 

Je-dai'a(5)(9) 

Je-dai'ah(5) 

Jed-de'us 

'Jed'du 

je-dei'ah (9) 

Je-di'a-el (13) 

Jed'i-ah 

Jed-e-di'ah (15) 

Je'di-ei (13) 

Jed' u-tfaun 

Je-e' li (3) 

Je-e'zer 

Je-e'zer-ites(8) 

Je'garSa-ha-du'dia 

Je-ha'le-el(13) - 

Je-bal'e-Iel(l3) 

Je-ba'zUel (13) 

Jeb-dei'ah (9) 

Je-hei'el (9) 

Je-hez'e-kel 

Je-hi'ah (9) 

Je-hi'el 

Je-hi'e-H(3) 

Jf-hish'a-i (5) 

Je-hi3-ki'ah(t5) 

Je-ho'a-dali 

Je-ho-ad'daa 

Je-ho'a-haz 

Je-bo'ash 

Je-ho'ha-dafa (9) 

Je-bo' a-nau 

Je-hoi'a-chiD (6) 

Je-hoi' a-^ia 

Je-hoi' a-kim 

Je-hoi' a-rib 

Je-hoi/a-dab 

Je-bon' a-than 

Je-hiyram 

Je-bo-sbab' e-ath 

Je-ho^'a-phat(I2) 



JE> 

Je-hosh'e-ba 
Je-hosh' a-a 
Je-ho'vah 
Je-ho'vah Ji'rea» 
Je-ho'vah Nis'd 
Je-ho'vah ShaTloaa' 
Je-ho'vab Sham^ 

mah 
Je-ho'vah Tsid'te- 

nu , 

Je-hoz'a-bad 
Je'hu 

Je-hub' bah 
Je' buccal 
Je' hud 

Je-hu'di (3) (13) ' 
Je-hu-di'jah(IJ) 
Je'husb 
Je-i'el 

Je-kab'ie-el(13j 
Jek-a-me' am 
Jek-a-mi'^(15) 
Je-tii'thj-el(13) 
Jetn'i-mah 
Jem-u'el (17) 
Jeph' thah 
Je-phun' nah 
Je'rah 

Je-rahm'e-el (13) 
Je-ralim' e-el-itei 
Jei'e-chus(6) 
Je'red 

Jer'e-ciai (5) - 
Jer-e-mi'ah (15) 
Jer'e-moth 
Jer* e-moudi 
Je-ri'ah(l5) 
Jei^i-bai(5) 
Jer'i-cho ((i) - 
Je'ri-el(13) 
Je-ri'jah(15) 
Je^i-moth 
Je'ri-oth 



fi02 



JE 



JO 



JO 



Jer'o-don 
Jei^ o-ham 
Jcr-o-bo' am 
Je-rub^ ba-al 
Je-raV e-sbeth 

Jei^u-el(17) 

Je-ru' sa-lem 

Je-ni'8ha(l3) 

Je-8ai^ah(5) 

Jesb-a-i' ah (5) 

Jesb' a-nab 

Jesb-ar' e-lab 

Jesb-eb' e-ah (9) 

Jesb-eb' e-ab 

Je' sber 

Jesh' i-'inoa 

Je-3bisb'a-i(5) 

Jesb-o-ba-i'ab (15) 

Je8b^u-a(13) 

Jesb'u-nm 

Je.si'ab(15) 

Je-sim' i-el 

Jes'se 

Jes'u-a(13) 

Jes' u-i (3) 

Je' sus 

Je' tber 

Je' fbetb 

Jetb' lab 

Je'tbro 

Je'tur 

Je'u.el(13) 

Je^usb 

Je' iiz 

JeV rie 

Jez-a-ni'ab (15) 

Je/ a-bel 

Je-ze' lu9 

Je' zer 

Je' zer-ites (8) 

Je^zi'i*(15) 

J«j'«i.d(U) 



Jez-li'ab (15) 
Jez'o-ar 

Jez-ra-bi'ah (15) 
Jez' re-el (13) 
Je/ re-el-ite (8) 
Jez' re-el-i-tess 

rgai 

Ig-da-li'ab(15) 
Ig-e-ab'a-rim (7) 
Ig'e-al (7) 
Jib' sam 

Jid'lapb 

Jim 

Jim' la, orlm'la 

Jim'na, or Jim' nab 

Jim'nites (8) 

I'jon 

Jiph'tab 

Jiph'tbab^l 

Ik'ke3b 

riai(5) 

Im'lab(9) 

Im' mab (9) 

Im'na, or Im'nab 

Tm 

Im-man'u-el (17) 

Im'mer 

Im'rab 

Im' ri (3) 

Jo'ab 

Jo'a-chaz 
Jo-a-da'nu8 
Jo'qb 
Jo'a-baz 
Jo' ^-kim 
Jo-an' na 
Jo-an' nan 
Jo' asb 

Jo'a-tham 
Jo-a-zab'dii8 
Job 
Joie 



Jo'bab 
Jocb'e-bed (6) 

Jo' da (9) 

Jo'ed 

Jo' el 

Jo-e'lab (9) 

Jo-e' zer 

Jog'be-ak 

Jog'li 

Jo'ba(9) 

Jo-ba' nan 

Jobn 

Jon 

Joi' a-da (9) 

Joi' a-kim 

Joi'a-rib 

Jok'de^an 

Jo'kim 

Jok' me-an 

Jok' ne-am 

Jok' sban 

Jok' tan 

Jok'tbe-el (1S> 

Jo'na(9) 
Jon'a-dab 
Jo' nab (9) 
Jo'nan 
Jo'nas • 
Jou'a-tban 
Jo' natb E' Urn 

Re-cbo' cbim (6) 
Jop'pa 
Jo'ra 
Jo'ra.i(5) 
Jo' ram 
Jo/ dan 
jo/i-bas 
Jo' rim 

Jo/ko-am 
Jo/a-bad 
Jo/a-pbat 
Jo8-a-pb^'as (15) 






IR 



IS 



JU 



£03 



Jo'se 

Jos'e-dech (6) 
Jo'se-el (13) 

Jo'seph 

Jo'ses 

Josh'a-bad 

Jo' shah (9) 

Josh'a-phat 

Josh-a-vi'ah (15) 

Joj3h*bek'a-sha 

Josh' u-a (9) 

Jo-si' ah (15) 

Jo-si' as 

Jos-i-bi'ah (15) 

Jos-i-phi'ah 

Jo-si'phus (12) 

I-o' ta (9) 

Jot"bah (9) 

Jof bath 

Jot'ba-tha 

Jo'tham 

Joz^a-bad 

Jo/a-char (6) 

Jo/a-dak 

Jph-e-dei'ab(15) 

Ir 

I'ra 

J'rad 






ram 



'ri (3) 
-ri'jah (15) 
^na-hash 



ron 

i^pe-el (13) 
r-she' mish 

ru 

sa-ac 
'zak 

-sai-ah (5) 
s'cah s 
s-car'i-ot 
s'da-el (13) 
sh'bah (9) 
sh'bak 

sh' bi Be'nob 
sh'bo-sheth 
'shi (3) 
-shi'ali(15) 
-shi'jah (15) 
sh' ma (9) 
Ish'ma-el (13)' 
sh'ma-el-ites (8) 
sh-ma-i^ah (15) 
sh' me^rai (5) 
'shod 
sh'p^a 



Ish'tob 

Ish'u-a(9) 

Ish'u.al(5) 

Is-ma-chi'ah (15) 

Is-ma-i'ah(15) 

Is' pah 

*Ii? ra-el 

Is'ra-el-ites(8) 

Is' sa-char 

l8.tal-cu'nis(13) 

Is'u-i(3)(13) 

Is' u-ites (8) 

Ith'a-i, orIfa-i(5) 

Ifa-ly 

Ith' a-mar 

Ith'i-el(13) 

Ith'mah (9) 

Ith' nan 

Ith'ra(9) 
Ith' ran 
Jth' re-am 
Ith' rites (8) 
It' tah Ka' zin . 
It'ta.i(5) 
It-u-re'a(13) 
I'vah 
Ju'bal 
Ju'cal 



IsroeZ.— This word is co^oq1lia^y pronounced in^ two syllables, and not nn* 
frequently beard in the same manner from the pulpit. The tendency of two 
vowels to unite, when tbere is no accent to keep tbem distinct, is the cause of 
this corruption, as in dmaany Isaac, &c.: but as there is a greater difficulty in 
keeping separate two unaccented vowels of the same kind, so the latter cormp* 
tion.is more excusable than the former; and therefore, in ray opinion, this 
mord ou^t always in public pronunciation, especiaUy in reading the Scripture^ 
to be heard in three syllables. Milton introduces this word four times in hia 
Paradise Lost, and constantly makes it two syllables only. But those who uho 
derstand Ei^lish Prosody know that we have a great number of words which 
have two distinct impulses^ that go for no more tiian a single syllable in verse^ 
^uch as heaioeny gwetif &c. : higher and dyer are always considered as dissyllables; 
and kbre and dtr«, xvfaich have exactly the same quantity to the ear, but as mono« 
jsyllables. Israd^ therefore, oug^t always, in deliberate and solemn speaking^ 
tp |>e hpurd in thiee lyUftliles. Tl«e same may be observed qiMa:pha/9l vidMkhtftlf 



C04 

Ju'<iah{9) 

Ju'«las 

Jude 

Ju-de'a 

Ju'dith 

Ju'el 



JU 



IZ 

Ji/ni-a 

Ju>ihab' he-sed 
Jus'tus 
Jut^tah (9) 
Iz'e-har (13) 
Iz-har 
I/har-ite (8) 



IZ 

Iz-ra-hi'ah.(15) 

Iz'ra-hite 

Iz-ra-i' ah, or 
I Is-ra-i' ah (9) 
I Iz* re-el (IS) 

Iz'ri<8) 
I Iz* rites (8) 



KE 

JCab 

KaVze-ei (13; 
Ka'des 

Ka'desh, or Ca'desh 
Ka'desh Bai^ne-a 
Kad' mi-el (13) 
Kad' mon-ites (8) 
Kal'la-i(5) 
Ka'nah(9) 
Ka-re'ah(9) 
Kar'ka-a (9) 
Kar'kor 
Kar'na-im (l6) 
Kai'tan 
Kar'tah (9) 
Ke'dar 

Ked'e-niah{9) 
Ked'e-inoth 
Ke' desh 

Ke-hera-thahO) 
^ei'lah (9) 
Ke-lai'ah(5) 
Keri-ta 

Kel-lcath-Jiaz-a' rim 
KeiD-u'el(lS)(17) 
Ke'nah (9) 
Ke'nan 



KI 

Ke'nath 

Ke'oaz 

Ken' ites (8) 

Ken' uiz-zites 

Ker-en-hap' puch 

Ker-en-/wp' puk 

Ke' ri-oth 

Ke'ros 

Ke-tu'ra 

Ke-tu'rah(9) 

Ke-ai'a(l)(9) 

Ke'ziz 

Kib'rolhHat-ta'a- 

vah 
Kib'^-im (16) 
Kid'r«D 
Ki'nah(9) 
Kir 

Kir-har' a seth 
Kir' be-reah 
Kii/i-eth, or 
Kir'jath 
Kii'jaaiAi^ba 
Kir', ath A' im 
Kii', ath A'rim 
Kir'jath A'ri-iu 
Kir'jadi Ba'al 



KU 

Kir'jath Hu'zotfa 
Kir'jath Je'a-nm 
Kir'jath San'nah 
Kir'jath Se' pher 
Kir'i-olh(4) 
Kish 

Kish'i(3) 
Kish' i-oo (4) 
Ki' shon, or 

Ki'son 
Kith'lifih 
Kit'ron 
Kit^tim 
Ko'a (9) 
Ko' hath 
Ko' hath-ites 
Kol-a-i'ah (14) 
Ko'rab (14) 
Ko'r3h-ites(8) 
Ko'ratb-ites 
KoKhite 
Kor'hites 
Kor'il^(8) 
Ko're 
Koz 
Kiuh-ai'afaC^) 



: 


( «o^ ) 


# 

> 


LE 


LO 

1 


LY 


La'a-dah(9) • 


Leb-be'us (13) 


Log 


La^a-dan 


Le-bo'nah(9) 


Lo'is 


La' bail 


Le'chah 


Lo Ru' ha-mah 


Lab' a-na (9) 


Le'ha-bim 


Lot 


La chish 


Le'hi 


Lo'tan 


I^-cu'nus (13) 


Leiii'u-el(17) 


Loth-a-su'bus (13) 


T^Man 


Le'shem 


Lo'zon 


La' el 


Let^tus 


Lu' bim 


La'had 


Le-tu' shim 


Lu' bims 


La-hai'roi 


Le' yi (3) 


Tiu'cas 


Lah' man 


Le-vi'a-dian 


Lu'ci-fer 


Lah'mas 


Le'vis 


Lu'ci-us 


Lab' ini (3) 


Le' \dte8 (8) 


Lud 


La'ish 


Le-vit' i-ciis 


Lu'dim * 


La'kum 


Le-um' mini 


Lu'hith 


La' mech (6) 


Tiib'a-nus 


Luke 


Tiap'i-doth 


Lib'nah(9) 


Lnz 


T^i-se' a (9) 


Lib'ni(3) 


Lyc-a-o' ni-a 


Tia' shah 


Tiib' nites (8) 


Lye' ca 


La-sha'roa 


Lyb' i-a (9) 


Lyd'da 


ILias'the-nes * 


Lig-nal' oes 


Lyd' i-a 


t^az' a-ru8 


Li'gureOi 


LyWni-as (4) 


Le' ah (9) 


T<ik'hi(3) 


Lys'ia(9) 


Leb' a-nah (9) 


Lo-am' mi (3) 


lAzhf e-a 


Leb'ajiion 


Lod 


Lys'i-as 


Leb' a-oth 


Lod' e-bar 


Lys'tra 



MA 



MA 



MA 



Ma' a-c ah (9) 
Ma' a-chah (6) 
Ma-ach' a-thi (3) 
Ma-ach'a-thites (8) 
Ma^d'ai(5)' 
Ma-a-di' 1^(15) 



Ma-a' i (5) 
Ma-al'eh.A-crab' 

bim 
Ma' a-nai (5) 
Ma'a-ratb 
Ma-a-sei' uk (9) 



Ma-^a-si'ah(I5) 
Ma' ath 
Ma'az 

Ma-a-zi'ah (15) 
Mab' da-i (5) 
Mac' a-loQ 



t06 MA 

Mac* ca-bees 
Mac-ca-bse'us 
Mach' be-nah 
Maeh'be-nai(5) 
, Ma'chi (3) (fl) 
Ma'chir 
Ma'cbir-ites (8) 
Mach'mas 
Mach-Uii-de'bai (5) 
Mach-pe'lah(6) 
Mach-he' loth 
Ma' cron 
Mad'a-i (5) 
Ma-di'a-bun 
Ma-di'ah(15) 
Ma'di-an 
Mad-man' nab 
Ma' don 
Ma-e'lui(13) 
Mag'bish 
Mag* da-la (9) 
Mag'da-lai 
Mag-da-)e' ne 
Mag'di-el (13) 
Ma'gog 

M a' gor Mis' sa-bib 
Mag' pi-ash (4) 
Ma'h^-Iah (9) 
Ma'ha-lath 

Ix'-aii' nolh 
Ma' ba-Iath 

Mas'chit (6) 
Ma-ha'le-el(I3) 
Ma'ha-li (3) 
Ma-ha-iia'uu(l6) 
Ma'ha-neh Dan 
Ma'ho-nem 
Ma-har'a-iCS) 
Ma'natb 
Ma'ha-vite»(8) 
Ma'haz 
Ma-Wzi-oth 



MA 

Ma'her-shal'al- 

hash'baz 
Mah'lah 
Mah'li(3) 
Mah'lite9(8) 
Mah' Ion 
Mai-an'e-as 
Ma'kas 
Ma'ked 
MakVlfidi 
Mak-ke'dah(13) 
Mak'tesh 
Mal'a-chi(3)(6) 
Mal'cham 
Mal-chi'ah(I5) 
Mal'dii-fil(13J 
Mal'cbi-el-ites (8) 
Mal-dii'jali 
Mal-chi'ram 
Mal-chi-sliu'ah (12) 
Mal'chom 
Mal'clius (6) 
Mai' las 
Mal'to-thi (3) 
Mal'lonh(6) 
Ma-mai' as (5) 
Mam' mon 
Main-ni-ta-nai' mOs 
Mam' re 
Ma-rau' cus 
Man' a-en 
Man' a-hath 
Mai/ a-hem 
Ma-na'belh-ites (8) 
Maii-as-ae'3S(12) 
Ma-Das' seh (0) 
Ma-Das' sites (8) 
Ma'neh (9) . 
Man-ha-na' im (l6) 
Ma' ni (3) 
Man'na 
Ma-no' ab 



MA 

Ma' och (6) 

Ma' on 

Ma' on-iles (8) 

Ma'ra<9) 

Ma' rah (9) 

Mai'a-lah 

Mar-a-nath'a 

Mar-do-ciie' U8 (6) 

Ma-re* shah 

Mark 

Ma/ i-sa (9) 

Mar* moth 

Ma' roth 

Mai're-kah (9) 

Mar'fie-na(9) 

Mar' te-na 

Mar'tha 

Ma' 17 

Mas'chil(6) 

Maa'e-Joth 

Mash 

Ma' shal 

Mas' man 

Mas' moth 

Ma/re-kab(9) 

Ma'sa (9) 

MaB-aab (9) 

Mas-si' as (15) 

Ma'tred , 

Ma'tri (3) 

Mat'Un 

Mat' tan-ah 

Mat-tao-i' ah 

Mat* ta-tha 

Mat-ta-dii'aa 

Mat-te-na'i (5) 

Mai' than 

Maf that 

Mat-tbe'las ' 

Mat^thew 

Mat-d]i'as(15) 

Mat-tUtbi'ah (15) 



HZ 

Maz-i-ti'iiB(15) 
MaZ'^za' roth 
Me'ah 

Me-a'rah 
Me-Wnai (5) 
ifech'e-rath(l3) 
MechVrath-^te (6) 
Me' dad 
Med'a-lah(g) 
Me' dan 
Med'e-ba (9) 
Medes 
Me'di-a 
Me'di-an 
.Me-e'da 
Me-gid-do (7) 
Me^d'don (7) 
Me-ha'U(3) 
Me^hel^a-bel 
Me-hi' da 
Me'hir 

Me-hofath-iteCS) 
Me-hii'ja-el(13) 
Me-!m'man(5> 
Me-hu'ium 
Me-hu' nims 
Me-jai' Icon 
Mek'o-nah (9) 
Mel-a-ti'ah(15) 
Mel'chi(3)(G> 
Mel-chi'ahC6)(9) 
Me!-«hi' as (15) 
>Iel'chi-eIC13) 
-MeUchis'e-dek 
Mel-chi-sliu'a(13) 
Me-le' a 
M«'lech(6) 
Mfl' li-cu 
Mefi-ta 
TsleV znr 
Mem" pliis 
Mc-nu'san (13) 



ME 

Mei/a-hem 
Me' nan 
Me'ne 
Me'oith 
Meo'o-thM (5) 
Me-on'&-neni ■ 
Meph'a-ath 
Me-phib' o-sheth 
Me'rab 

Mer-a-i'ah(15) 
Me-rai'oth(5) 
Me' ran 
Mei'a-ri(3) 
Mei'a-rites(8). 
Mer-a-tha' iio (l6) 
Me' red 
Mer* e-moth 
Me' res 
Mei'i-bahO) 
Mei'i-bahKa'desh 
Me-rib' l>a-al 
Mer" i-motii (4) 
Me-ro'dacli (1 1) 

Bid' a-dan 
Me' roin 

Me-roii'o-tiiite(8) 
Me'rgz 
Me' ruth 
Me'sech(6) 
Me'acA 
Me' aha 
Me'shach(6) 
Me'sheth(6) 

Mesli-cl-e-mi' ah 
Mesh-ez" a-bel 
Mesh-ez* a-beel 
Mesh-i!-la'inilh 
MeMi-il' le-moth 
Me-sho' bah (9) 
Me-shul' lam 
Me-shul' le-mitb 
Mes'o-bah (13) 



Mt 



807 



Mes'o-ba-ite(8) 

Mes-o-po-ta' mi-a 

Mes-si'ab (15) 

Mes-si'aa (15) 

Me-te'ruH<I3) 

Me'theg Arn'mah 

Meth' re-dath 

Me-thu' sa-el 

Me-thu' se-lah (9) 

Me-Au'se-la 

Me-u'iiim(l3) 

Me/a-hab ' 

Mi' a-min 

Mib'har 

Mib'satD 

Mib' zar 

Mi'cahO) 

Mi-cai'ah(5> 

Mi'chaC9) 

Mi'cha-el(15) 

Mi'chah (9) 

Mi-^ai' ah 

Mi'chel 

Mich'iiiiia(6) 

Mi^mas 

Mich' maah 

Mich' me-thah (9) 

Mich' ri (3) 

Mich' tarn 

Mid'(£n 

Mid'i-an 

Mid' i-ao-ites (8) 

Mig'da-lel 

Mig'dal Gad 

Mig'dol, 

Mig'ron 

Mij' a-mia 

Mik'loth 

Mik-nei'shCQ) 

Mil-a-la' i (5) 

Mil'cah (9) 

Mil'chah(9) 

.Mil'<^a(9} 



SOS 



MI 



MO 



MY 



Mil' com 
MU'lo 
Mi'na(9) 
Mi-ni' a-min 
Min'ni(3) 
Min' nith 
Miph' kad 
Mir'i-am 

Mk'maO) 
Mis' gab 

Mish'a-el (13) (15) 
Mi'8hal(3) 
Mi' sham 
Mi'she-al 
Mish'ma (9) 
Mish-man'na 
Mish' ra-ites (8) 
Mis' par 
Mi8'4>c-reth 
Mis'pha (9) 
Mis'phali(9) 
Mi&'ra-im (l6) 
Mis' re-photh-ma' 
im(lv6) e 



MiA'cah(9) 
Mith'nite(8) 
Mith'ri-dath 
Mi' zar 
Mi/ pah (9) 
Miz'peh(9) 
Miz'ra-im (l6) 

'Miz'zah(9) 

Mna' soa 

'No! son 

Mo'ab 

Mo' ab-ites (8) 

Mo-a-di'ah(15> 

Mock'mur 

Mock' ram 

Mo' din 

Mo' eth 

Mol' a-dah (9> 

Mo' lech (6) 

Mo'M 

Mo'Ii(3) 

Mo' lid 

Mo' loch (6) 

Mo'lok 



Mom'dis 
Mo-o-si'as (13) 
Mo'rash-ite (8) 
Mo'ras-thite 
Mor'de-cai(5)<l3) 

Mo'reh(9) * 
Mor' esh-eth Gath 
Mo-ri'ah (15) 

Mo-se'ra(9) 
Mo-se' rah (Q) 
Mo-so' roih 
Mo'ses. 
Mo' zes 
Mo-sol' lam 
Mo-sul' la-moa 
Mo' za (9) 
Mo'zah 
Mup'pim 
Mu'shi (3) 
Mu'shites(&> . 
Mudi-lab' bea 
Myn' dus 

My'ra(9) 
Myt-e-le'ne 



NA 



NA 



NA 



Na'am 
Na' a-mah (9) 
Na'a^mail (15) 
Na' a-ma-thites (8) 
Na'a-mites (8) 
Na' a-rah (9) 
Na' -a-rai (5) 
Na' a-ran 
Na' a-rath 
Na-ash' on 
Na' a-thu» 
Na'bal . 



Nab-a'ri-as 

Na-ba-the'ans 

Na' bath-ites (8) 

Na'both 

Na'ehon(6) 

Na'chor<6) 

Na'dab 

Na-dab'a-tha 

Nag' ge (7) 

Na-ha'li-€l(13) 

Na-hal'lal 

Na'haJol 



Na'ham 

Na-ham'a-ni (3]^ 

Na-har'a-i(5> 

Na'hash 

Na'hath 

Nah.bi'(3) 

Na'ha-bi(3> 

Na'hor 

Nah'shon 

Na' hum 

Na'i.dus(5) - 

Na'im 



N^ 



NE 



NY a09 



Na'm 
Nai'oth (5) 

Na-ne'a(9) 

Na' o-mi (S) 

Na' pish 

NaiA'i-si^) 

Naph'tha-li(3) 

Naph'thar 

Naph'tu-him(ll) 

Nas'bas 

Na'shon 

Na'sith 

Na' 8or 

Na'than 

Na-than'a-el (13) 

Nath.arni'as(15) 

Na' than Me' lech (6) 

Na've 

Na'um 

Na2-a-rene' 

Naz-a-reneis' (8) 

Na/a-reth 

Naz'a-rite(8) 

Ne'ah 

Ne-a.ri'ah (15) 

Neb'a-i(5) 

Ne-bai' oth (5) 

Ne-ba'ioth 

Ne-'balNlat 

Nc'bat 

Ne'bo 

Neb-u-chad-ne/ zar 

Neb-u-chod-on'o- 

8or 
Neb-di-chad-rez'zar 
NelMi-cha^ban 
Neb-^-zai^»-dan 



Ne'cho (6) 
Ne-co' dan 
Ned-a-bi'ah(l5) 
Ne-e-mi' as 
N^ i-noth (7) 
Ne-hel'a-mite 
Ne.he-nu'ah(9)(15) 
Ne-he-mi'as 
Ne'hum 
Ne-hush'ta (9) 

Nc'-hush'tah 
Ne-hush' tan 
Ne'i-el(13) 
Ne' keb 
Ne-ko'da 

Nem-u'el(13)(17) 

NeiH-u'el-ites (8) 

Ne'ph^ 

Ne'phi(3) 

Ne'phis 

Ne'phish 

Ne-phish'e-sim 

Neph'tha-li(3) 

Nep'tho-ah 

Neph'tu-im 

Ne-phu'iiim (IS) 

Ner 

Ne' re-US 

Ner' gal 

Ner' gal Sha-re'zer 

Ne' ri (3) 

Ne-ri'ah (15) 

Ne-than'e-el(lS) 

Neth-a*ni' ah 

Neth'i-nims 

Ne-to'irfiaI|(9) 
\'a-thi(3) 



Ne-toph'a-thitea 
Ne-zi'ah (15) 
Ne'zib 
Nib' has 
Nib' shan 
Nic-o-de' raus 
Nic-o-Ia' utanei 
Nic' oAaB 
Nim' rah 
Nim'rim 
Nim'rod 
Nim'shi(3) 
Nin'e-ve 

Nin'e-vehO) 
Nin'e-vite8(8) 
Nissan 
Nis'roch (6) 
Nis^rok 

No.a.di'ah(15) • 
No' ah, orNo'e 
Nob 

No' bah (9) 
Nod 

No' dab 

No' e-ba (9) 

No'ga, orNo'gak. 

No' hah (9) 

Nom 

Nom'a-des 

Non 

Noph 

No^phah(9) 
No-me'ni-us 
Nun, the father of 

Joshua 
Nym'pha» 



( '210 ) 



OM 



OP 



OZ 



Os-A-jil'AH (15) 


(ymar 


O'reb 


Cbal 


0-me'ga(9) 


O'ren, or Cyran 


Cbed 


O'mer 


O-ri'on 


Cbed E'dom 


Om'ri(3) ' 


Of' nan 


Cbeth 


On 


Oi^phah©) 


O'bil 


O'uam 

• _ 


Wfa 


Cboth 


Cnan 


Or-tho-si'as(15) 


0'chi-el;(13) 


O-nes' i-mus 


O-sai'as (5) 


Oc-i-de*!n,s (7) 


On-e-sipb' o«rus 


O-se'as 


Os-i-def/ia 


O-ni' a-res 


O'see 


Oc'i-iia(7) 


0-m'as(15) 


Cshe-a 


0/ i-na 


Cno 


Os'pray 


Oc'ran 


O'nus 


O^si-frage 


O'ded 


O-ny' as 


Oth'ni (3) 


0-«oi'lam 


On'y-cha. 


Oth'ni-el(4)(13) 


Od-on-ai'keB 


Oit'e-ka 


Oth-o-ni'as(15) 


Og 


(ynyx 


O' zem , . , 


O'had . 


Cphel 


0-2i'as(15) 


O'hel 


O'pher 


0'zi-el(4)<13) 


Ol'a-mus 


O'phir 


Oz'ni (3) 


. O-lym'phas 


Oph'ni(3) 


Oz' nites (8) 


Oinra-e^rus(13) 


Oph'rah 


O-zo'ra (9) 


PA 


PA 


PA 


1 a'a-rai (5) 


Pal' lu-ites (8) 


Par'me-na.s 


Pa' dan 


Pal'ti (3) 


Par'nath 


Pa' dan A' ram 


Pal'ti-el (IS) 


Par'nachCQ 


Pa' don 


Pal'tite(8) 


Pa'rosh 

* 


Pa'gi-el(7)(13) 


Pan' nag 


Par-shan'da-tha 


Pa' hath Mo' ab 


Par'a-dise 


Par'u-ah 


Pa'i(3)(5) 


Pa' rah 


Par.va'im(5)(l6) 


Pa'lal 


Pa' ran 


Pa'sach (6) 


Pal'es-tine 


Pai^bar 


Pas-dam' min 


Pal'lu 


Par-mash' ta 


Pa-se'ah (9) 



'•4 



PE 

Pash'iir 

Pas' o-ver 

PafarFE 

Pa-te'o-Ii 

Pa-the' m (15) 

Fath'ros 

Path-ru' sim 

Pat'ro-bas 

Pa'ta 

Paul 

Pecf a-hel (IS) 

Pecrah-zur 

Ped-ai' ah (5) 

Pe'kah (9) 

Pek-a-hi'ji 

Pe'M 

Pel-«-i'ah(5) 

Pel-a-li'ah 

PeU-ti'ah(15) 

Pe'leg 

Pe-let 

Pe'leth 

Pe'leth-ites(8) 

Pe-li'aii (1.5) 

PeKo-nite (S) 

Pe-Ai'eWlS) 

Pe-nih'iiab 

Pen'oi-nah 

Pen-tap' d-Iis 

Peo'ta-teucb (6) 

Pen'ta-teuk 

Pen' te-cost 

Pen' te-coast 

Pe-bu'el (13) 

Pe'or 

Per' a-zim 

Pe'resh 

Pe'rez 

Pe'rez U^ » 

Per* pi (9) 

Per' ga-mos 

PMi'da (9) 



Per'ii-zitea (8) 

Per'me-rias 

Per-u'da(0)(l3) 

Pefli-a-hi'ah(15) 

Pe'thor 

Pe-dm'el(13) 

Pe-uTttiai (5) 

Phac' a-reth 

Phai'sur(5) 

Phal-dai'uB(5) 

Pha-Ie'a8(ll) 

Pha'leg 

Phal'lu 

Phal'ti(3) 

Phal'ti-el(lS) 

Pha-nu'el (13) 

Phar'a-cim(7) 

Pha' ta-oh 

Fa'ro 

Pbar-a-dio'Di (3) 

Pha'rez 

Pha',rei-ite8 (8) 

Phai' i-sees 

Pha'rosh 

Phar'phar 

Phar'zites (8) 

Pha'se^h (13) 

Pha-se'lis (13) 

Phai'i-ron 

Phe-be 

:Phe-ni'ce(13) 

Phib'e-seth 

Phi' col 

PhUW ches 

Phi-le'mon (11) 

Plii-l^tus(ll) 

Phi-US' ti-a 

Pfaillia'tim 

Pbi4id' tines (8) 

Firli/tiia 

Phil-o-DM^ tor 
P a 



Phin'e-es 

Plun'e-^ 

Phi'aon(l) 

Phle'goo 

Pho' ros 

Phul, rhymes duU. 

Pfaur 

Phu'rah 

Phut, rhymes nut 

Phu'vah ' 

Phy-^el'lu3 

Phj-lac'te-ries 

Pi-ha-hi^roth 

Pi' late 

Pil'daah 

Pil'e-lba 

Pil'tai(5) 

Pi'non 

Pi'ra, 

Pi* ram ' 

Pir'a-thon 

PiKa-tfaon-ite (8) 

Pis' gab 

Pi'sonCl) 

Pis' pah 

Pi'thon(l) 

Poch'e-reth (6) 

Pon' ti-ua Pi' iate 

Poi' a-tha (9y 

Pot'i-phar 

Po-tipli' e-ra 

Pu'a, orPu'ah 

Pu'dens 

Pu'hite9(8) 

Pul, rhymes Sull 

Ptfnites (8) 

Pu'non 

Pur, or Pu'rira 

Put, rhymes aut 

Pu'tMl(13) 

P/gaig 



( «12 ) 



RA 

Ra'a-mah (9) 

Ra^.ini'ah(15) 
Ra-am' ses 
Rab'bah . 
Rab'bath 
Rab'bat 
Rab'bi (3) 
Rab'bith 
Rab-bo' ni (3) 
Rab^ mag 
Rab' sa-K;es 
Rab' sa-ris 
Rab'sha^keh(9> 
Ra' ca, or Ra' clia 
Ra'cab(6) 
Ra'cal 
Ra'chab(6) 
Ra'chel(6) . 
^ Rad'da.if5) 
Ra'gau 
Ra'ges 
Rag'u-a 
Ra-gu'el(l3) 
Ra'bab 
Ra^ham 
Ra' kem 
Rak' kath 
Rak' kon . 
Ram 



RE 

Ra^ ma, or Ra'mah 
Ra' math 

Ra-math*a'im (l6) 
Ram' a-them 
Ra' math-ite (8) 
Ra'mathLe'hi 
Ra' math Mis' peh 
Ra-me' ses 
Ra-mi'ah(15) 
Ra' moth 
Ra'moth Gil'e-ad 
Ra' pha 
»Ra'pha-eI(13)ri5) 
Ra!phel 
Ra' phah (9) 
Raph'a-im(l6) 
Ra' phon 
Ra'phu 
Ras'sis 

Rath[u-mus(12) ^ 
Ra'zis 

Re-a-i'ah(5) 
Re'ba(9) 
Re-bec' ca (9) 
Re' chab (6) 
Re' chab-ites (8) 
Re'chjih (9) 
Refka 
Re-el-ai'ah (5) 



RE 

Re.el-i'as(I5) 

Ree-sai'as (S) 

Re'giem, the g hard; 

Re-gem' me-Iech 

Re'gom 

Re-ha-bi'ah (15) 

Re'hob 

Re-ho-bo' am 

Re-ho^boih 

Re'hu 

Re' hum 

Re'i (3) 

Re' kem 

Rem-a-li'ah(15) 

Re' meth 

Rem' mon 

Rem' mon Meth' o- 

ar- 
Rem'phan 
Rem' phis 

Re'pha-el(lS)(15> 
Re' phah 
Reph-a-i'ah(J5) 
Reph'a-im (16) 
Reph'a.im« 
Reph'i-dim 
Re' sen 
Re' sheph 
Re'u 



* Raphael.—- This word has uriformly the accent on the first syllable throngjb* 
out Milton, though Grscised hy *ra<^tth\; but the quantity is not so invariably 
settled by him ; for in his Paradise Lost he makes it four times of three sylla. 
bles, and twice of two. What is observed under Imwl is applicable to tku 
word. Colloquially we may pronounce it in two, as if written Raphel; but in 
deliberate and solemn speaking or reading, we ought to make the two tost vow* 
els to be heard separately and distinctiy. The same may be obsenred of 
MichaHf which Milton, in his Paradise Lost, ises six times as a word of three 
syllables,, and eigbteen Um^s as a word of two only. 



RH' 



RO 



RO 



SIS 



Reu' ben 
Re-u'el(13) 
Reu'mah 
Re' zeph 
Re-zi'a (15) 
Re' zin 
Re' zon 
Rhe' gi-um 
Jtefje-um 
Rhe'sa 
Refsa 
Rho'da 



Rhod'o^ua 
Ri'bai(5) 
Rib'lah 
Rim' mon 
Rim' mon Pa'rez 
Rin'nah (9) 
Ri'phath 
Wfath 
Ris^sah (9) 
Rith' mah 
Ris' pah 
Ro-ge'lim(7)(13) 



Roh' gah (9) 

Ro'i-mus 

Ro-mam-ti-e' zer 

Rosh 

Ru'by 

Ru'fus 

Ru'ha-mah 

Ru'mah 

Rus'ti-ciia 

Ruth 

Rooth 



^ 



SA 

Sa-bac-tha'ni* 

•f-Sab' a-oth 

Sa'bat 

Sab'a-tus 

Safa'ban 

Sab' bath 

Sab-ba-the'us 

Sab-be' us 

Sab-de'us 

Sab'di(3) 

Sa-be'ana^ 

Sa'bi(3) 



SA 

Sab' tab (9) 
Sab'te-cha (6) 
Sa'car 

Sad-a-nri'as (15) 
Sa'das 
Sad-de' us 
Sad' due 
Sad' du-cees 
Sa'doc 

Sa-ha-du'tha Je'gar 
Su' la 
Sa'lah (9) 



SA 

Sal-a-sad* a-i (5) 

Sa.la'thi^i(l3) 

Sal' cab (9) 

Sal'chah 

Sa'Iem 

Sa'lin) 

Sal'la-i(5) 

Sal'Iu 

SaFlum 

Sal-lu'mus(13y 

Safm^, or Sid' mah 

Sal'mon 



•a^— ^Mta 



* Sabacttumi, — Some, says the editor of Labbe, place tjbe accent oo the an* 
Upenultiinate syllable of ^is word, and others on the penultimate : this last 
pronunciation^ he says, is most agreeable to the Hebrew word, tbe penultimate 
of which is not only long, but accented : and as this word is Hebrew, it is cer* 
tainly the preferable pronunciation. 

f &i&ao/A.— This word should not be confounded m its pronunciation with 
SMathf a word of so different a signification. Sabaoth ought to be heard ia 
three syllables, by keeping the a ^d o separate and distinct This, it most be~ 
confessed, is not very easy to do, but is absolutely necessary to prevent a veiy 
;gros»«onfiitton4>f ideas, siad a (enrcruoa of tbe sense. 



2H 



SA 



SA 



SA^ 



SaI-mo'«e (13) 
Sa' lorn 
Sa-lo'me(13) 
Sa'ltt 
Sa' lum 
Sam'a-el(l«) 
Sa-mai'as (5) 
Sa-ma' ri-a, or 
Sam-a-ri' a 
Sa-ma/ i-tans 
Sam' a-tus 
Sa-mei' us (9) 
Sam' gar Ne'bo 
S*',mi(3). 
Sia' mis 

Sam'Iah(9) 
Sam' mus 
Samp' sa-n^es 
Sam son 
Sam'u-el (13) (17) 



San-a-bai^ sa-rus 

Sai/a-sib 

San-bal'lat 

San'he^im 

San-san'nah 

Saph 

Sa'phat 

Saph-a-ti'as (15) 

Saph'ir 

Sa'pheth 

Sap-phi' ra (9) 

Sap'phire 

Sar-a-bi'as.(15) 

Sa'ra, or Sa'rai (5) 

Sar-a-i'ah (5) 

Sa-rai'as(5)(13) 

Sa-ram' a-el 

Sar'a-mel 

Sa'raph 

Sar-ched' o-nus (6) 



Sb/ de-US 

Sar'dis 

Sar'dites(8) 

Sar'di-us 

Saf'dine' 

Sa/do-nyx 

Sa' re-a 

Sa-rep'ta 

Sar'gon 

Sa'rid 

Sa'ron 

Sa.ro'thi(3) 

Sar-se'chim (6) 

Sa' ruch (6) 

♦Sa'ten 

Sath-ra-baz'nes 

Sath-ra-b'ou-za' nes 

Sav'a-ran 

Sa'vi-as(15) 

Saul 



* Sstem. — There is some dispute among the learned about the quantity offiui 
second syllable of this word when Latin or Greek, as may be seen in Lanbei 
but none about the first. This is acknowledged to be short ; and this has Ihp 
duced tliose critics who have grei(t knowledge of Latin, and very tittle of their 
own language, to pronounce the tot syllable short in English, as if written 
Sattan. If thes^ gentlemen have not perused the Principles of Pronudciatioiiy 
prefixed to the Critical Pronomicing Dictionary, I ^ould take the liberty of re« 
feiving them to What is there said, for fiiU satis&ction, for whatever relates t<> 
deriving English quantity from the Latid. But for those who have not an inp* 
pprtunity of inspecting that work, it may, perhaps, be sufficient to observe 
that no analogy is more univeraal than that which, in a Latin word of two syl* 
lables, with biit one consonant in the middle, and the accent on the first syl- 
lable, leads us to pronounce that syllable long. This is, likevnse, the genuine 
pronunciation of English words of the same form ; and where it has been coiu|i> 
teracfed we find a miserable attempt to follow the Latin quantity in the Englistt 
word, which we entirely neglect in the Latin itself, (see Introduction, pinge xlil;) 
Cajtb add Plato are instances where we make the vowel a long ic English^here 
ft is short in Latin ; and caligo and cogiio^ where we make the a and « in the 
first syllable short'in English, when it is long in Latin. Thus if a word of ttvo 
iyllablcs, vfith one consonant in theiniddle and themccent on the first, vdiidi^ 
according to our own vemacolaruialogy, vre should pronounce as lire da €«^ and ^ 
Plato, with the first vowel long : if this word, I say, happens to be derived from 
a word of tliree syllables in Latin^ with the first shorty this is looked upon as 

agoo4 



SE. 



SE 



SH, 



215 



Sce'vB . - 

Sefva ' • 

Sche'chem (6) 

Skef kem 

Scribes 

Scyth' i-ans 

Sytki-am 

Scy-thop-o-lis 

Scyth-o-pol' i-tans 

Se'ba 

Se'bat 

Sec' a-cah 

Sech-e-ni'jis (15) 

Se' chu 

Sed-e-cFas (15) 

Sed-crsi'as (7) 

Se'gitb 

Se'ir 

Se'i-rath 

Se'la 

Se' la Ham-mah-le' 

koth 
Se'lah(9) 



Se'led 

Sel-e-mi'as (15) 
Sem 

Sem-a-chi'ah (15) 
Sem-a i'ah(15) 
Sem-a-i' as (5) 
Scm'e-i(3) 
Se-mel' le-us 



Se' mis 



Sen' a-ah 

Se'neh(9) 
Se' nir 

Sen-a-che'rib(13) 

Sen'u-ah 

Se-o'rim 

Se' phar 

Seph' a-rad 

Seph-ar-va'im (16) 

Se' phar-vites 

Sc-phe'la 

Se'rah 

Se-ra-i'ah (5) 

Ser' a-phim 



Se'red 

Se' ron 

Se' rug 

Se'sis 

Ses'thel 

Seth 

Se' thar 

Se'ther 

Sha-al-ab' biii 

Sha-al' biiii 

Sha-al'bo-nite (i) 

Sha'aph 

Sha-a-ra'im (l6) 

Shar'a-im 

Sha-ash'gas 

Shab-beth' a-i (5) 

Shach'i-a 

Shad'4a-i (5) 

Sha' drach 

Sha'ge(7) 
Sha.haz'i.inath(l3) 
Shal'le-chetU 
Sha' lem 



a good reaspn for shortening tlie first syllable of the Englisli word, as in magic, * 
placidy tepid, kc, though we violate this nilc in the pronunciation of tlie Latin 
'words caligo, cogito, kc, which, according to tliis analogy, ought to be cale-i-go, 
eoge-irto, &c., with tlie first syllable long. 

This pedantry, which ought to have a harsher title, has considerably hurt tiie 
sound of our language, by introducing into it too many short vowels, and con- 
sequently rendering it less flowing and sonorous. The tendency of the penul- 
timate accent to open and lengthen the first vowel in dissyllables, veith but one 
consonant in the middle, in some measure counteracts the shortening tendency 
of tVv'o consonants, and the almost invaiiable shortening tendency of the ante- 
penultimate accent; but this analogy, which seems to be tlie gcnuipe operation 
of nattO'e, is violated by these ignorant critics fi-om the pitiful ambition of ap- 
pearing to understand Latin. As the fiiSt syllable, therefore, of tlie word in 
question has its first vowel pronou/iced short for such miserable reasons as have 
been shown, and tliis short pronunciation does not seem to be general, as may 
be seen imder the word in tlie Critical Pronouncing Dictionary, we ought c€^r- 
tainly to ipcline to tliat pronunciation which is so agreeable to the analogy of 
. our own language, and which is, at tlte same time, so much more pleasing to 
the car. — (See Principles prefixed to the Critical Pronouuciug Dictionary-, No, 
d43, 544, &Ck| an4 the words Dratna and SiUire,) 



«16 



SH 



SWItm 

Shal'i-ths 

Shal' kim 

Shal 'ma-i (A) ' 

Shal' man 

Shal ma-ne'ser 

Sha'ma 

Sham-a-ri'afa (15) 

Sha'med 

SWmer 

Sham' gar 

Shapa' hut)) 

Sha' mir 

Sham' mai (9) 

Sham'mah (9) 

Sham' ma-i (5) 

Sham' moth 

Shamrmu' a (9) 

Shamr-mu'ah (9) 

Sham-she-ra' i (5) 

Sha' phaqi 

Sha'phan 

Sha' phat 

Sha'bher 

Sha/4-i(5) 

Shar'ma-im (16) 

Sha'rar 

Sha-re' ler 

Sha' ron 

Sha'roD-ite (8) 

Sha-ru' hen 

Shash'a-i(5) 

Sha' shale 

Sha'veh(9) 

Sha' velh 

Sha' ul 

Kia'ul-ites (8) 

Sha-u' iha 

She'al 

She-al'tielC13) 

She-a-ri'ah(15) 

tfte-ar-ja' shub 

jBhe'KorShe'bah 



SH 

She' bam 

Sheb-a-ni'ah(15) 

Sheb' a-rim 

She' bat 

She' ber 

%eb'na 

Sheb'u-el(]3) 

Shec-a-ni'ah 

She'chem (6) 

She' chem-iteB 

Shech' i-nah 

She)ife-mih 

Shed' e-ur 

She-ha-n'ah(l5) 

She'kel 

She'kh 

Shp'l?n-ite8(8) 

Shel-e-mi' ah ( 1 5) 

Sbe'leph 

She'lesh 

Shel'o-piiCS) 

Shel'o-mith 

SheKo-moth 

She-lu'mi-el (13) 

Shem 

She' ma 

Shem'a-ah (9) 

Shem-a-i' ah (5) 

Shemra-ri'ah (15) 

Shem'e-ber 

She' mei' 

She-mi' da (13) . 

Sheih'i-nith 

She-mir' a-moth 

She-mii'el(13) (17) 

Shen . 

She-na^ zar 

She* nir 

yhe' pham 

Shepb-a-ti'ah(I5) 

She'phi (3) 

She'pho 

She-phu'phai)(11) 



SH 

She' rah 

Sher-e.bi'iih(15) 
She'resh 
She-re' zer 
She ^ck 
She'eh^ (5) 
She'sh^n 
Shesh' ba/ zar 
Sheth 
She'thar 

She'thar Boz'itar} 
She'vR 
SIiib'b»-Ieth 
Shib'mah(9) 
Shi' chron 
Shig-gai' on (5) 

Shi'hor 

Shi' hor lib'natb 

Shi-i' im (3) (4) 

She-f im 

Shil'hi(3) 

Shil'him 

Shil' lem 

Shiflem-ites (8) 

Shi'loh, orShi'io(9) 

Shi-Io'ah (9) 

Shi-lo'ni (3) 

Shi-lo'nites(a) 

Shifsh^ (9) 

Shim'e-a 

Shim'e-ah 

Shim'e-am 

Shim'e-atb ■ 

Shim' e-ath-fta* 

Shim'e-i (3) 

Shim'e-on 

Shim' hi (3) 

Shi' mi (31 

Shim'ites (8) 

Shim' ma (9) 

Shi'mon 

Sbirn'ratb 



sfi 

Shiin'ri(S) 
Shini'ridi 
Shim'roa 
Shirn'roDHtes (8) 
Shim'ron Me'ron 
Shim'shai (5) 
ShVaah 
Shi'nar 
Shi' phi (3) 
Shiph'mite 
Shiph'ra (9) 
Shiph'ratb 
Ship' tan 
Shi'shaO) 
Shi' shale 
Shit'ni-i(5) 
Shjf lah (9> 
Shit'tim Wood 
ShKza(9) 
Sho'aX9) 
Sho'ah (9) 
Sho' ab 
Sho bach (6) 
Sho' ba^i (5) 
Sfao'bal 
Sh</bek 
Hh&bi (5) 
Sho'cho(6) 



SH 

Sho'choh (9> 
Sho' ham 
Sho' mer 
Sho'l^»ch(6) 
Sho'phan 
Sho-shan' aim 
Sho-shan' nini 

E'duth 
Shu' a (9) 
Shu' ah (9) 
Shu'al 

Shu'ba-ei(l3) 
Shu' ham 
Shu* ham-ites (8) 
Shu' hites 
Shu'lam-tte 
Shu' inath-ites (8) 
Shu' nam-ite 
Shu'nem 
Shu'ni (3) 
Shu'nites (8) 
Shu' phaiu 
Shu'pham-ite 
Shup' p)m 
Shur 
Shu'riian 
Shu'dian E'duth 
Shu'the-iah(9) 



SI 

Shii'(hal-ites(8) 

Si'a (1) 

Si'a-ka(l)(9> 

Si'ba 

Sib' ba-chai (5). 

Sib'b»-leth 

Sib'maK(9) 

Sib'ra-im (1 6) 

Si'chem(l)(6) 

Si(f dim 

Si'de 

Si' don 

Si-gi' o-noth (7) 

Si' ha (9) 

Si'hon 

Si'hor 

Si'las 

Sil'la(9) 

•Sil'o-a 

Sil' o-aa 

Sil'o-ah, or 

Sil'o-am 

Sil'o-e(9> 

Si-mal-ca'e 

Sim' 

Sim' 

Si'mon 

Sim'ri<3) 



(8) 



• SU/ia. — ThUword, according la the -present general rule of prDnonnriitf 
these words, ought to have Hie accent on llic second syllable, as it is Orsciie4 
by Ii>i»i ; but Milton, whs undentood its derivntion an well as the prcaent ree* 
pf critin, lius given it llie antepenultimate aceent, »i more agreeable to tha 
feneral aualogy af accenting Gnglisli words of the nine form : 

, Or if SioD hill 

Ucliglit thee more, or Si/oa's brook, thattlow'd 



Fart Ijy the oracle of God . 

If criticisni ought not to orerttm lettled unge^ Bnrely when *h»t nn^e b 
■anctioned by rach a poet as Miltun, it ou^t not to be looked npon h ■ 
licence, batan aulliority. With respect to the quantity of the (int lylhU^ 
analogy requirei that, if th« accent be on it, it illould be «hort.— <S«« RalW 



■lafiMd to the Onek ■ 



B Pn^ NUK>, rale (19), 



^18 



S^ 



Sin 

*Si' nai (5) 

Si^nim 

Sin^ites (8) 

Si'oi^ 

Siph'moth 

Sip' pai (5) 

Siracli(l)(6) 

Si' rah (9) 

Sir' hon 

Sis-am' a-i (5) 

SiV e-ra (9) 

Si-sia'nes 

Sitfnkh 

Si' van 

So 

So' ehoh (6) (9) 

So'ko 

So'coh (9) 

So'ko 

So' di (3) 



Sod'om 

Sod'onohites 

Sod'o-ma 

Sol'o-mon 

Sop'a-ter 

Soph'e-reth 

So'rek 

So-sip'a-ter 

Sos'the.nes(13) 

Sos'tra tus(13) 

So'ta.i(5y 

Sta'chy8(6) 

Sta' kees 

Stac' te 

Steph' a-nas 

Steph'a-na 

Ste'phen 

Su' ah (9) 

Su'ba 

Su'ba.i(5) 

Suc'coth 



3Y> 

Suc'coth Be'noth 

Su-ca' ath-ites (8) 

Sud 

Su'di-as 

Suk' ki-ims (4) 

Sur 

Su'sa 

Su' san-chites (6) 

Su-san' n^b (9) 

Su'si(3) 

Syc'a-mine 

SyTce'ne 

S/charClXe) 

Sy-e'ius(l«) 

Sy-e'ne 

Syn'a-gogue 

iSW a-gog 

Syn'ti-dte (4) (6) 

Syr' i-a Ma' a-cah 

Syi^i-on 

Sy-ro-phernic'i-a 



* Sinai, — If we pronounce this word after the Hebrew, it is three syllables; 
if after the Greek, 2ivS, two only ; though it must be confessed that the liberty 
snowed to poets of increasing the end of a lin6 with one, and sometime two 
tfQsiile»f renders their ^pthority, in this case, a little equivocal. Labbe 
adopts the former pronunciation, but general usage feems to prefer the latter : 
and if we almost universally follow the Greek in other cases, why not in thi&^ 
Hilton adopts ^e Greek : 

Sing, heavenly mu9e! that oa the secret top 
Of Oreb or of Shun pidst mspire 
That shepherd : — 

<; . God, from the mount of Snuu, whose gray top , 

Shall tremble, he, descending, will himself. 
In thunder, lightning^ and krad trumpets' sound. 
Ordain them laws. 

« 

Par, Losty b. xii. v. 227* 

:We onght not, ihdeed, to lay too much stress on the qwmtity of Milton, whidi 
is often so different in tiie same word; but these are the only two passages in 
Jhis Paradise Lost where this wolrd is used ; and as he has made the same letters 
H 4i|thtbpng in AtmaMy it is fairly probable he Judged that Sinai ought to be 
pronounced in two syUableSk^Set fiiujes pre&i^ed to this Yocabiilaiy, N,9. 5.^ 



c s» y 



TA 

TaVnachSbt'lo 

Tab' ba-otfa 

Tib'balh 

Ta'he-al ' 

Ta'l»*l (13) 

Ta-beTli-ua 

Tab'e-n (9) 

Tab' Ma 

Ta'bor; 

Tab' ri-mon 

Tach' mo-uita 

Taa'mOf 

Ta'ban ., 

Ta'ban-ites(&> 

Ta-haph' a-nes 

Ts-hap' e-nea 

Ta'hath 

TaW'pe-nesO) 

Tah're-a (9) 

Tah'tim Hfid'iJii 

Tal'i-tha Cu'mi 

Tai'mai(5) 

Tal'mon 

Tal'sai , 

Ta'mab 

Ta'mar , 

Tam'miiz 

Ta'iiacb(6) 

Tan'hu-meth 

Ta'nia 

Ta'pbatk 

'fapb'e-iiea 

Taph'nea 

Ta'phon 

Tap'pu-afi (is) 

Ta'nih(if) 

Ta/a-lahOXlS) 

Ta're-a (9) 



Ta/pel-iKa (8) 


Trfrarek (6) 


Tar' .bis 


Thad-d.' m (ta) 


Tai-Aiili 


Tba'ba.h 


Tar-fhi'<i(3) 


Tha'iiiah(9) 


Ta^ana 


Thani'na-lha 


Tai'tak 


Tha'r«(9) 


Tar'tan ■ 


Thai'ni (9) ■, 
n.aj'.bi.b ' 


Tal-na-iO) 


Te'bah(9) 


Thas'.i (3) 


Teb-a-U'ah(13) 


Thc'bez : 


Te'beth 


Tbe-co'e 


Te-haph'ne-hea 


Thi^Wsa 


Te-bin-oah 


Thc-lei'sia 


Te'kel 


Tlie-oc' u-iiiu 


Te-ko'a,i,or 


■llie-od'i. tus 


Te-ko'ah 


'ITie-opb' i-iuB 


Te-WitW (8) 


The'ras , 


Tel'a-bib 


IVKme-leA 


Te'Uh(9). 


'ITies-'ia-lq^iij^ca 


Tel'a-im (16) 


Th™'da« 


Ta-bu'sar, 


'rhiin'iia-UiaUi 


Te'lem 


TIm'be 


Tel-ba-re'Ja 


Tliom'as 


Tel-bai'ja (9) 


Tom'o. . 


Tel'me-la (9) 


'!Tiom'o-i(3) 


Tel'me-la).(9) 


'n,r«..e'a. 


Te'maO) 


Tbiini' miiii 


Teaman 


Th}-a-t]'™ (9) 


TeiVa-ili(3) 


Tib'balh , 


Te'inan-ite.(8) 


Ti-be'ri-a« 


Tem'e-m (3> 


Tib'm(3), 


T.'pho 


Ti'dal 


Te'nh(9) 


Tigflath PMxt . 


TeKa-pliim 


Tik'vab (9) 


Te'reA 


Tik'vadi: - 


Ter'ti-us 


Ti' lun 


Tei^ske-us 


Ti-me'lus (13) . , 


Ter-tuTJus , 


rim'na(i/) . * 


Te'la ■ ■ 


^iui'iiatli (9) 



sso 



TI 



TO 



TY 



Tim'na-tfaah 
Tim'nathHe'res 
Tim'nath Se'rah 
Tim'nite (8) 
11-mo'thems 
Tim'o-thy, (Sag.) 

Tip'sahfQ) 
Tr ras - 
Ti'ratb-ite* (8) 

Tu'ha-kahO) 
Tir'ha-nah 
Tif'i-a (9) 
IVsha-tfaa 

llsh'bite 
Tl'van 
TYza . 
'Ti'fflte (8) 



i 



To'ah 

To'aMiah 

Tob 

To-bi'ah(15) 

To-bi'as (15) 

T</bie, (Ei^.) 

T6'bi-d(4)(lS) 

To-bi'jah (15) 

To'bit 

To' chen (6) 

To-ear'itaah 

To'hu 

To'i(3) 

To'la (9) 

To' lad 

To' la-ite8.(8) 

ToKba-nes 

Tol'mw(5) 



To'phel 

To' phet- 

To'u 

Trach-o-iu'tia(12> 

Trip'o-lis 

Tro'as 

Tro-gyl'li-um. 

Troph'i-mua 

Try-phe'na(12) 

Try-pho'«a (1«) 

Tu'bal 

Tu'balCa'in 

Tu-bi'e-ni(S) 

'Ty-be'ri-as • 

Tych'i-cus 

Tyre, one itfllable 

Ty-«ran'nus 

Ty'niB ■ 



■■■VTH 

V A-JB«' A-THA 

Va^ah(9) 

Vash'ni (3) 

Vash' ti (3) 

U'cal 

U'd 

U'Ia.i(5) 

U'lam 

Ul'la(9) 

Um'mah(9) 

Un'm (3) 



UT 

(9) Voph'si (3) 
U'phaz 
U^phai'sm 
Uirba-ne 
U'ri(3) 
U-ri'^(9) 
U-ri'as(13) 
U'ri-el(4),(13) 
U n'jah (9) (15) 
U'rim 
U'ta(9) 



UZ 

U'dia-i(5) 
U'thi (3) 
U'za-i (5) 
U'zal 
Uz'za (9) 
Uz/zah (9) 
Uz'zen She'rah 
Uz'zi(3) 
Uz-zi'ah(15) 
Uz-zi'el(13)(15) 
Uz-zi'el-iles (8) 



XA 

Xan'tiu-ciM 



XE 

IXe' Qe-as 
Xer-o-phft'gi-a 



XY 

Xe-rol'y-bc 
Xys' tui 



i 221 ) 



ZA 

^a-a-na'im (16) j 
Za' a-man 
Za-a-nan'^fiim 
Za'a-van' 
Za'bad 
Zab-a-dae' ans 
Zab-a-dai' as (5) 
Zab'bai(5) ' 
Zab'ud : 

Zab-de'us (12) 
Zab'di(3) 
Zab'di^l(ll) 

Za-bi'imO) 

Za'bud 

♦Zab'u'lon 

Zac' ca-i (5) 

Zac' cur 

Z.ach-a-ri' ah (15) 

Za'cher (6) 

Za' ker\ 

Zac-che^us (12) 

Zak-k(fm 

Za'dok 

Za'ham 

Zia'ir 

Za'laph 

ZaFmon 

Zal-mo'nah (9) 

Zal-mun^nah 

Zam' bis 

Zam'bri(6) 



ZE 

Za'moth 
Zam-zum'mims 
Za-no' ah <9) 
Zaph-nath-pa-a-ne' 

Za'phon 

Za^ra 

Zai/ a-ces ; 

Za^ rah 

Zar-a-i'as (15) 

Za're-ah 

Za're-ath-ites (8) 

Za'red 

Zai^e-phath . 

Zar' e-tau 

Za'reth Sha'har 

Zar'hites(8) 

Zar'ta-nah 

Zar^than 

5Sath'o-e 

Za-thu'i(3)(ll) 

Zatfa'thu 

Zat'tu 

ZaWan 

Za'za 

Zeb.a.di'ah(15) 

Ze'bah(9) 
Ze-ba'im(13)(l6) 
Zeb'e-dee 
Ze-bi'na 
Ze-bo'im (13) 



ZE 

Ze-bu'da(13) 
Ze'bul " 
Zeb'u-lon 
Zeb'u-lon-ites (8) 
Zech-a-ri'ah(15) 
Ze'dad 

Zed-e-ki'ah (15) 
Zeeb 

Ze'lah<9) 
Ze'lek 
Ze-lo'phe-ad 
Ze-lo'tes (13) 
Zel'zah 

Zem-a-ra' im ( I6) 
Zepi'a-rite (8) 
Ze-mi'ra . 
2^' nan 
Ze'nas 

Ze-oi^un (13) , 
Zeph-a-ni'ah {\S) 
Zephath 
Zeph'a-thah - 
2^'phiy or Ze'pho 
Ze' phon 
Zeph' on-ites (8) 
Zer 

Ze'rah(9) 
Zer^-hi'ah(15) 
Zer-a-i' a (5) , 
Ze'rau 
Ze'red 



* Zobulon, — ^ Notwithstanding^" fays the editor of Labbe^ ^ this word in 
^ Greek, ZaCu^wv, has the peiiultimate long, yet in oor churches we always 
** hear it pronounced with the aeute oh the antepenultimate. Those wfae'tfaus 
** pronounce it plead that m Hebrew the penultimate vowel is short ; but in tfa« 
^ word Znmhahel^ Zo^UXf they follow a different rale; for, thon^ the 
^ penultinate in Hebrew is long, they pronounce it with the antepenaltini9l» 
^ lurcent" 



222 



ZI 



zt 



/ 



zu 



Zer'e-da 
Zer'e-dah - 
Ze-red'a-thah 
Zicr' e-ratb 

Ze' reth 

Ze' ri (3) 

Ze'ror 

Ze.ru'ah(15) 

Ze-rub' ba-bel 

Zer.li-i'ah(15) 

Zer-vi'ah(15) 

Ze'tbam 

Ze'thaii 

Ze'diar 

Zi'a<9) 

Zi'ba (9) 

Zib'e-op 

Zib' i-6n 

Zich'ri(3) 

Zikfri 

Zid'dim 

25cJ.ki'jah (\5) 

Tifdon, or Si' don 

Zi-do'ni-ans 



Zif 

Zi'ha(l)(9) 
ZikHag ' 

Zil'lah©) 
Zil'pahO) 
ZiKthai(5) 
Zim^msih 
Zim^raniy or 

Zhn'ran 
Zim'n (3) ■ 
Zin 

Zi'naClXg) 
Zi'on,or Si on (1) 

Zi'or(l) 

Ziph 

Zi'phah(l) 

Ziph'i-on (2) 

Z]ph'ites(8) 

Zi phron (1) 

Zip'por 

Zip.po'rah(13)(t6) 

Zith'ri(3) 

>Ziz 

Zi'za(l)(9) 

Zi'zah(l)(9) 



1'*^ 



«*-*i 



Zi'na (1) (9) 
Zo'an 
Zo'ar ' 
Zo' ba, or . 

Zo'bah 
Zo.be'bah(9)(l3> 
Zo'har 
Zo'he-Ieth 
Z(»/a-ras 
Zo'peth 
Zo'phah 
Zo'phai (5) 
Zo'phar 
Zo'phim 
Zo'rah 

Zo' rath-ites (8) 
Zo're-ah(9) 
Zo' rites (9) 
*Zo-rob'al)-el 
Zu'ar 
Zuph 
Zur 

Zu'ri.el(i3) 
Zu-riHshad' da-i (5) 
IZu'zims 
/• 



* Zor«6ai«l.--See ZtMm. 



/ • 



tERMlNATIONAL VOCABULARY 



OF 



SCRIPTURE PROPER JfAMES. 



E B A* 

Accent the Antepenultimaite. .£, 

> . ' ' * 

Bathsheba. Elisheba. Beersheba. . 

ADA IDA 

Accent the PentUtimate. 
Shemicbu ' *. 1j;*j 

Accent the Antepenultimate* 
Eliada, Jehoida> Bethsaida, Adida. 

EA EGA ECHA UPHA ? 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Laodicea, Chaldea, Judea^ Arimathe^^ Idumea, Caeaareai 
Berea, Iturea^ Osea, Hosea, Omega, Hasupha. 

. Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Cenchrea, Sabtecha. ;; 

ASH A ISHA USHA 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Elisha, Jenisha. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
BaasI^, Shalisha. 

ATHA ITHA UTHA - 

Accent the Penultimate* 
Jegaf^akadtitfaa, Dalmanudia. 



* For the proQundatioa of tbe final « in tbis selectioOf see Role the 9Ui* 



! 



* ( 224 ) 

Accent, the Antepenultimate. 

Gabadia, Gabbatha^ Amadatba/ Hammedatbay Parshandatha^ 
Ephphatha^ Tirshatba, Admatha, Caphenatha, Poratha, Achme« 
tha, Tabitha, Golgotha. 

I A 

• 

(Pronounted in two syllables.) 

V Accent the Penultimate, 

Seleucia^'^y Japhia, Adalia, Betbulia, Nediania, Chenania; 
Jaazania, Jamnia^ Samaria, Hezia. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

AchUia, Arabia, Thracia, Samothracia, Grecia, Cilicia, Cappa* 
^lociay Seleucia, Media, India, Pindia, Claudia, Phrygia, An* 
tiochia» Casipbia, Philadelphia, Apphia, Igdalia, Julia, Pamphy- 
lia, Mesopotamia, Armenia, Lycaonia, Macedonia, Apollonia, 
Junia, Ethiopia, Samaria, Adria, Alexandria, Celosyria, Syria, 
Assyria, Asia, Persia, Mysia, Galatia, Dalmatia, Philistia, 

I K A 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Elika. 

ALA ELA ILA AMA EMA IMA 

' Accent the Penultimate. 
Ambela, Arbela, Macphela. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
MagdalA, Aquila, Aceldama, Apherema, Ashima, Jemima, 

ANA ENA INA ONA 
Accent the Penultimate. 
Diana, Tryphena, Hyena, Palestina, Barjona. 

Accent the AntepenultimcUe. 
Abana, Hashbadana, Amana, Ecbatamu 



* For this word and Samaria, AnHochioj and AUxmtdriog lee the InUiai Voetk- 
Mary of Greek and Latio Proper Names, AJ10 Sole doth prefixed to tfa* 
imUial Vocabulary. 



( 225 ) 

O A 

Accent the Anlepenuliimale. 
Gilboa^ Tckba, Silo^, EshtemSa. 

ARA ERA IRA URA 
Accent the Penultimate, 
Giizara, Ahira, Sapphira^ Thyatira, Bethsura. 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 
Bliara, Bethabara^ Patara^ Potiphera, Sisera. 

ASA OSA 
Accent the Penultimate. 
d'easa, Tryphosa. 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 
Adasd; Amasa. 

ATA ETA ITA 
Accent the Antepenultimate, 
Ephphata, Achmeta, Melita, Hatita. 

AVA UA AZA , 
Accent the Penultimate* 
Ahava^ Malchishua^ Elishua^ Shamua, Jahaza. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Jcshua^ Abisbua^ Joshua. 

AB IB OB UB 
Accent the Penultimate: 
Eliab; Sennacherib, Ishbi^Benob, Ahitob, Ahitub. 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 

Abinadab, Aminadab, Jehonadab, Jonadab, Chileab^ Aholiab; 
Magor-Missabib, Aminadib, Eliashib, Baalzebub, Beelzebub. 

AC UC 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
IsaaCi SyriaCi Abacuc^ Habbacuc. 

Q 



( £26 ) 

AD ED ID^OD UD 

Accent the Penultimate^ 

Almpdad; Arphaxad^ Elihud^ Ahihud, Ahiud, Ahilud. 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 

Galaacf, Josabad, Benhadad^ Gilead^ Zelophead^ Zelophehad, 
Jochebed^ Galeed^ Icabod, Ammihud, Abiiid. 

CE DEE LEE MEE AGE YCHE OHE ILE AME 
OME ANE ENE OE OSSE VE . 

Accent the Penultimate, ^ 

Phenice, Bernice, Eunice, Elelohe, Salome, Magdalene, 
Abilene, Mitylene, Cyrene, Syene, Colosse, (Nazarene, pro- 
nounced in thiee syllables, with the accent on the last.) 

« Accent the Antepenultimate.- 

Zebedee, .Galilee, Ptolemee, Bethphage, Syntyche, Subile, 
Apame, Gethsemane, Siloe, Ninive. 

I T E * (in one syllable.) 
Accent the Penultimate. 

Thisbite, Shuhite, Abiezrite, Gittite, Hittite, Hivite, Buzite. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Harodite, Agagite, Areopagite, Gergashite, Morashite, Ha- 
ruphite, Ephrathite, Bethelite, Carmelite, Hamulite, Benjamite, 
Nehelamite, Sbalamite, Shunamite, Edomite, Temanite, Gilo- 
iiite, Shilonite, Horonite, Amorite, Jebusite. 

Accent the Preantepenultimate. 

NUamathite, Jezreelite, Bethlehemite, Rphraimite, (Canaanite 
generally pronomiced in three syllables, as if written Can-an-ite.) 

AG OG 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Abishag, Hamongog. 



* Word3 of this tenninatioii have the accent of the words from which they are 
ibjrmed, and on tbis account are sometimes accented even on the preantcpen- 
Hltimate syllable; as Bethlehemite fcom, Bethelhem, and so of others. Words 
^f this termination therefore, of two syllables, have the accent jon the penulti- 
soate syllable ; and words of three or mor« on the same, syUable ai their primi- 
tWM.--Stte Rttle the 6th, page 175. 



( 227 ) 

BAH CAH DAH EAH CHAH SHAH THAtt 

Accent the Penultimate^ 
2^bazibah^ Makkedah, Abidah^ Elishah. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Dinhabah^ Aholibah, Meribah, Abelbethmacah, Abadah, 
Moladah, Zeredah, Jedidah^ Gibeali^ Shimeah^ Zaphnath- 
PUaneah, Meachah^ Berachah, BUashah^ Eliathah. 

AIAH EIAH 
(Ai and ei pronounced as a diphthong in one syllable.) 

Accent the Penultimate. 
* Micaiah, Michaiah, Benaiah^ Isaiah^ Iphedeiah^ Maaseiah. 

{Ai pronounced in two syllables.) 
Accent the Penultimate. 
Adaiah^ Pedaiah, Semaiah^ Seraiah^ Asaiah. 

I A H 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Abiahy Rheabialiy Zibiah, Tobiah, Maadiah^ Zebadiah, Oba« 
diahy Noadiahy Jedidiah, Ahiah, Pekahiah, Jezrahiah, Barachi- 
* ah, Japhiahy Bithiah, HezekiaJi, Helkiali, Zedekiah, Adaliah, 
Gedaliah, Igdaliah, Athaliah, Hackaliah, Remaliah, Nehemiah, 
Shelemiah, Meshelemiah, Jeremiah, Shebaniah, Zephaniah^ 
Nethaniah, Chenaniah, Hanamah, Coniah, Jeconiah, Sneariah, 
Zacfaariafa, Zechariah, Amariah, Shemariah, Azariah, Neariah^ 
Moriah, Uriah, Josiah, Messiah^, Shephatiah, Pelatiah, Ahacziahy 
Amaziah, Asaziah, Uzziah. 

J A H 

Accent the Penultimate* 

Aijah, Abijah, Jehidijah, Ahijah, Elijah, Adonijah, Irijah, 
Tobadonijah, Urijah, Hallelujah, Zerujah. 



* For the pronmiclatioo of the two last sylhiblet of theie words, sec Rule 5 A 
prefixed to Scripture Proper Names, page 173, 174. 



1 



( 4J8 ) 

KAH LAti MAil NAH OAH RAH SAH TAti YAH 

UAH - . 

Accent the Pentdtimate.- 

• 

Rebekah, Azekali, Mackpelah^ Aholah, Abel-mAolab, Beu- 
lahy filkanahy Hannah, Kirjath-sannah, Harbonah, Hashmonah, 
Zaimonah, Shiloah, Noah, Manoah, Zanoah^ tjzzen-sberah^ 
Zipporah, Keturah, Hadassah, Malchishualiy Shammuah, 

Jehovah, Zeruah, P 

« 

Accetit the Antepenultimate. 

Marrekah, Baalah, Shuthelah, Telihelah, Methuselah, Hachi- 
lah, Hackilah, Daiilah, Delilah, Havilah, R'aamah, Aholiba- 
niah, Adamuh, Eiishamah, Ruhamdi, Loruhamah, Kedemah, 
Ashimah, Jemimah, Penniiiah Baarah, Taberah, Deborah, 
Ephratah, Paruah. 

ACrt ECH OCH 

Accent the Pentdtimate. 
Merodach, Evil-merodach. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Aliisaniach, Ebed-melech, Abimelech, Ahiirielech, Elime- 
lech, Alanimelech, Anammelecli, Adralmelech, R^genmielech^ 
Nathan-mel^h, Arioch, Antioch. 

KEH LEH VEH APH EPH ASH ESH I9H 

Accent tjie Penultimate. 

Elealeh, Elioreph^ Jehoash, 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Rabshakeh, Nineveh, Ebiasaph, Bethshemesh, Enshemesh^ 
Carchemish. 

ATH ETH ITH pTH UTH 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Goliath, Jehovah-jirethj Hazar-maveth, Baal-berith, Reho« 
both, Arioth, * Nebaioth^ Naioth, Moseroth, Hazeroth, Pihahi- 
roth, MosoTOth, Atlon-bachuth. 



The «i i& this and tiie mext word fona one syUable.--See Rule 5, page. 173. 



( 229 ) 

Accent the Antepenultimctte^ 

Mahalath, Bashemath, Asenath^ Paberath, Elisabeth, Dab- 
bashethy Jerubbesheth, Ishbosheth, Mephibosheth, Harosbeth, 
Zoheletb, Bechtileth, Shibboleth, Tanhumeth, Genesareth, 
Asbazareth, Nazarjeth, Mazzareth, Kirharaseth, Shelomith', 
Shemioith, Lapidoth, Anathoth, JKerioth, Shemiramoth, Kede- 
moth^ Ahemotli^ Jerimoth, Sigionoth, Ashtaroth, Mazzaroth. 

A I 

(Pronpm^ced as a diphthong in one syllable.) 

Accent the PenuUimaie. 

Chelubai, Asmadai, Shesbai, Shimshai, Hushai, Zilthai, 
Berothai, Tahnai, Tolmai, Sinai, Talnai, Arbonai, Sarai, Sippai, 
!6ezai. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Mordecai^ Sibbachai, Chephar-Hammonai, Paarai. 

A I^ 

(Pronounced in two syllarbles,) 
Accent the Penultimate. 
Ai. ^ 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Zabbai, Babai, Nebai, fifaobai, Subai, Zacc'ai, Shaddai, Ami* 
shadd'ai, Aridai, Hddiii> Heg^, Haggai, Bel^i, 3iiga^9 Abi^Ui, 
Uthai, Adl'aiy Barziir^i, Ulai» Sisamai, Shalm^, Shammai^ 
Eliaenai, TatnUi, Shether-bp^ai, Naharai, Sharai| Shamsherai, 
Shitrai, Arisai, Bastai, Bayai, 3igvai; Uzai. 

DI EI LI MI NI OI PI RI UI ZI 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Areli, Loammi, Talithacumi, Gideoni, Benoni, Hazeleponi, 
Philippi, Gehazi. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Engedi, Siroei,. SUmei, Edrei, ^Bethbirei, Abisei, BUah, 
Naphthali, Nephthali, Pateoli, Adami, Naomi, Hanani, Beer- 
lahairoi, Merari, HUahashtari, Jes.iii. 

EK UK 

Accent the Antepetiultimftte. 
Adonizedek, Adouib^^z^. 



( 230 ) 

Accent thi Antepenultimate. 
Melchizedek, Anialek, Habakkuk. 

AAL EAL lAL ITAL UTAL 
Accent the Penultimate, 
Baal, Kirjath-b'aal, Hamutal. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
MeribbUal, Eshbaal, Ethbaal, Jerub'aal, Tab'eal, Belial, Abital. 

AEL ABEL EBEL 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Jael, Abel. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Gabael, Michael, Raphael, Mishael, Mehujael, Abimjiel, 
Ishmael, Tsmael, Anael, Nathanael, Israel, Asael, Zerubbabel, 
Zerobabel, Mehetabel, Jezebel. 

EEL OGEL AHEL ACHEL APHEL OPHEL ETHEL 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Enrogel, Rachel, Elbethel. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Tabeel, Abdeel, Japhaleel, Mahaleel, Bezaleel, Hanameel, 
Jerahmeel, Hanameel, Nathaneel, Jabneel^ Jezreel, Hazeel| 
Asahel, Barachel, Amraphel, AchitopheL 

lEL KEL 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Peniel, Uzziel. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Abiel, Tobiel, Adiel, Abdiel, Gaddiel, Pagiel, Salathiel, 
Ithiel, Ezekiel, Gamaliel, Shelumiel,* Daniel, Otbniel, Ariel, 
Gabriel, Uriel, Shealtiel, Putiel, Haziel, Hiddekel. 

UEL EZEL 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Deupl, Raguel, Bethuel, Pethuel, Hamuel, Jemuel, Kemuel^ 
Nemuel, Phaniiiel^ Penuel, Jemel, Bethezel.. 



• * ■ 



C 231 ) 

I / 

• -• • 

Accent the Antepenuliimaie, 

* Samuel^ Lemuel, Emanuel, Immanuel. 

AIL 

(Pronounced in two syllables.) 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Abihail. 

AIL 

(Pronounced as a diphthong in one syllable.) 

Accent the Antepenuliimaie. 

Abigail. 

OL UL 

Accent the Penultimate* 
, Bethgsunul. 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 

. Eshtaol. 

ODAM AHAM lAM IJAM IKAM 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 

Abraham, Miriam, Adonikam. 

O A M 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Rehoboam, Roboam, Jeroboam. 

Accent the Antepenultimate p 

Siloam, Abinoam, Ahinoam. 

ARAM IR AM ORAM 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Padanaram, Abiram, Hiram, Adoniram^ Adoram, Hadoram, 
Jehoram. 



* Set Kale the 17tb prefixed to Scriptnre Proper Name«^ pajj^e 17 ^\ 



' ( 232 ) 

• AHEM EHEM ALEM EREM 

Accent the Antepenultimate. - ■ ' 

Menahem^ Bethlehem^ Jerusalem, Beth-haccerem. 

AIM* / 

Accent the Penultimate, ,, 

Chusan-Rishath'aim, Kirjathaim, Bethdiblathaim, Ramatbainiy 
Adith'aim, Misrephothmaim, Abelm'aim, Mahanaim, Manha- 
naim, Horon'aim, Shaaraim, Adoraim, Sepharvaim. 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 

Rephaim, Dothaim, Eglaim, Carnaim, Sharaim, Ephraim, . 
Beth-epliraaim, Mizraim, Abel-mizraim. 

BIM CHIM PHIM KIM LIM NIM RIM ZIM 

Accent the Penultimate, 

Sarsechim, Zeboim, Kiijatharim, Baburim, Kelk-adi-hazurim. 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 

- Cherubim^ Lehabim, Rephidim, Seraphim, Teraphim, EKa- 
kim, Jehoiakim, Joiakim, Joakim, Bijialim, DedaDim, Etfaanim^ 
Abarim, Bethhaccerim, Kirjath-jearim, Huzerim, Baal-perazim, 
Gerizim, Gazizim. 

DOM LOM AUM lUM NUM RUM TUM . 

Accent the Penultimate^ -0 

Obededom, Appii-forum, Miletura. 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 

Abishalom, Absalom, Capernaum, Rh^ium, Trogyllium, 
Iconium, Adramyttium, Galbanum. 

AAN CAN DAN EAN THAN IAN MAN NAN 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Memucan, Chaldean, Ahiman, Elhanan, Johaiian, Haman. 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 

Canaan, Ch^aafi, Merodach-^baladan, Nebuzaradap, EIna- 



/^ 



In this lelection the aiibrm distinct 3yUables. — See Kale 16, piige 179. 



( 233 ) 

than, Jonathan, Midian^ ImUan, Phrygian, Italbtni Macfdoiuai]^ 
Ethiopian^ Syriiaii, Ass}Tian, Egyptian, NUaman. 

AEN VEN CHIN MIN 2IN. 

Accent the Penuliimate, 
, Manaen, Betfaaven, Chorazin. ' . 

Accent the Aniepenultirmte' 
Jehoiachin, Bepj^pun. 

EON AGON EPHON ASHON AION ION ALON 
ELON ULON YIX)N MON NON RON YOlf 
THUN RUN. * 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Baal-meon, Beth-dagon, B'aal-zepfaon, Naashon, Hig^aion, 
Shiggaion, Chilion, Orion, EsdreloQ, Baal-hamon, Philemon, 
Abiron, Beth-horon. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Gibeon, Zibeon, Gedeon, Gideon, Simeoi;!, Pirathon, Hepo- 
dion, Carnion, Sirion, Ascalon, Ajalon, Aslqelon, Zebjidoni 
Babylon, Jeshimon, Tabrimon, Solomon, Lebanon, A^<9l3|y 
ApoUyon, Jeduthun, Jeshurun. 

EGO ICHO HIO LIO 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Ahio. 

Accent the Antepenultimate^ 
Abednego, Jericho, GalHo. 

AR ER IR OR UR 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Ahishar, Baal-tamar, Balthazar, Eleazar, Eziongeber, Tig- 
ladi-pileser, Shalmaneser, Hadadezer, Abiezer, Ahiezer, EUe- 
zer, Romantiezer, Ebenezer, Joezer, Share;Eer, Havo.t)]i-ji^r| 
Asuoth-tabor, Beth-peor, Baal-peor, Nicapor, Phijoi^eltpr, 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Issachar, Potiphar, Abiathar, Ithamar, Shemeber, Lucifer, 
Chedorldomer, Aroer, Sosipaler, Sopater, Achior, Nebucfao- 
donosor^ Eupator^ Shedeur, Abishur^ Pedahzur. 



( 254 ) 

AAS BAS EAS PHAS IAS LAS MAS NAS OAS PAS 

RAS TAS YAS 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Oseas, Esaias, TobiaS) Sedecias, Abadias, Asadias^ Abdias, 
Barachias, Ezechias, Mattathias, Matthias, Ezekias, Neemias, 
Jeremias^ Ananias, Assanias, Azarias, Ezerias, Josias^ Ozia$^ 
Bageas, Aretas, Onyas. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

AiinUas, Barsabas, Patrobas, Eneas, Phineas, Caiaphas, Clco- 
pfaas, Herodias, Eiiodias, Georgias, Amplias, Lysanias, Ga- 
brias, Tiberias, Lysias, Nicolas, Artenias, Elymas, Parmenas, 
Siloas, Antipas, Epaphras. 

CES DES EES GES HES LES NES SES TES 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Gentiles,* Rameses, Mithridates, Euphrates. 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 

Rabsaces, Arsaces, Nomades, Pliinees, Astyages, Diotrephe^ 
Epiphanes, Tahap)ianes, Hermogenes, Taphenes, Calisthene3, 
Sosthenes, Eiunenes. 

ENES AND INES 

(In one syllable.) 
Accent the Ultimate. 
Gadarenes, Agarenes, Hagarenes. 

I 

Accent the Penultimate^ 
Philistines, (pronounced Philisiins,} 

I T E S 

(Pronounced in one syllable.) 

[Words of this termination have the accent of tlie words from 
which they are formed, which sometimes occasions the accent 
to be placed even on the preantepenultimate syllable, as 
■ I - I I ■ I ■ . I , — . — ■ > . . ■ 

9 Gcn^i/e».— This may be considered as an English word, and should be pro- 
Bounced in two syllables, as if written Jen-tiles the last syllable as the pl^iral 
of tile, 

I 



( 9.S5 ) 

Gileadites from Gileady and so of others. Words of this ter- 
mination therefore^ . of two syUables, have the accent on the pe- 
nnltimate syllable ; and words of three or more on the same syl- 
lable as their primitives.] 

• • 

Accent the Penultimate, 

Gadites^ Kenites^ Jammites, Levites, Hittites, Hivites. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Hechabites, Moabites^ Gergeshites, Nahathites^ Kohathites, 
Pelethites, Cherethites^ Uzzielites, Tarpeiites, Elamites^ Edo^ 
mites, Reubenites^ Ammonites, Hermonites, Ekronites, Haga- 
rites, Nazarites, Amorites, Geshurites, Jebusites, Ninevites, 
Jesuites, Perizzites. 

Accent the Preantepenultimate. 

Gileadites^ Amalekites^ Ishmaelites, Israelites, Midianites, 
Gibeonites, Aaronites. 



Zelotes. 



Elimais. 



O T E S 

Accent the Penultimate, 

I S 
Accent the Penultimate. 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 



Antiochis, Amathis, fi'aalis, Decapolis, Neapolis, Hierapolis, 
Persepolis, Amphipolis, Tripolis, Nicopolis, Sc^diopolis^ Sa- 
lamis, Damans, Vabsaris, Antipatris, Atargatis. 

IMS 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Emims, Zumims, Zamzummims. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Rephaims, Qammadimis, Cherethims, AoBkims, Nethemmi. 
Chemarims. 



( «36 ) 

ANS 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Sabeam, Laodiceans^ Assideans^ G^lileana^ Idameans^ Epi- 
enreans. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Arafoi^Ky Grecians^ HerodianSy Antiochians, COTindiiafis^ 
Farthians, Scythians, Athenians, Cyrenians, Macedonians, 
Zidonians, Babylonians, Lacedemonians, Ethiopians, Cyprians, 
jSyrian^,' Assyrians, Tyrians, Ephesiqns, Persians, Qalatians, 
£r/etians, Egyptians, NiGDlaitaDs, Scythopolitans, Saiyiaritawn, 
liyjbians. 

MOS NOS AUS BUS CUS DUS 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Archelaus, Menelaus, Abubus, Androniciu, Seleucus. 

Accent the Antepenultimate* 

Pergamos, Stephanos, Emmaus, Agabus, Bartacus, Achaicuv, 
Tychicus, Aradus. 

E U S • 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Daddeus, Asmodeus, Aggeus, Zaccheus, Ptolemeus, Macca- 
beus, Lebbeus, Ceiidebneus,. Thaddeas, Mardocheus, Mordo- 
dteus, Alpheus, Timeus, Bartimeus, Hymeneus, Elizeus. 

Accent ihe Antepjenulfimote^^ 

Po^itheus^ Timodieus, Nereus. 

GUS CHUS THUS 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 

Areopagus, Philologus, Lysknachus, Antiochus, Eufychus, 
Amadathus. 

I u s 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Darius, 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Gaius^ Athenobius, Cornelius, Numenius, Cyre;4ti|i^ Apok 

2 



( 237 ) 

lonius, Tiberius, Demetrius, Mercurius, Dionysius, Pontia?, 
Tertius, 

LUS MUS NUS RUS SUS TUS 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Aristobulus, Eubulus, Nicodemus, Ecanus, Hircanus, Anra^ 
nus, Sylvanus, Ahasuerus, Assuerus, Heliodorus, Aretunis, 
Bar-jesus, Fortunatus, Philetus, Epaphroditus, Azotus. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 

Attalusy Theophilus, Alcimus, Trophimus, Onesimus, Didj- 
mus, Libanus, Antilibanus, Sarchedonus, Acheacharus, Laza- 
rus, CitHerus,^ Elutheriis, J'ainis, Prochorus, Onesiphoras, Asa- 
phara8U9> Ephesus, Epenetus, Asyncritus. 

AT ET OT 1ST OST 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Ararat, EUphalet, Gennesaret, Iscariot, Antichrut, Peatecost 

EU HU ENU EW MY 

Accent the Penultimate. 
Casleu, Chisleu, Abihu, Andrew. 

Accent the Antepenultimate. 
Jehovah-Tstdkenu, Bartholomew, Jeremy. 

BAZ GAZ HAZ PHAZ 

Accent the Penultimate. 

Mahar-shalat-faash-baz, Shaash-gaz, Eliphaz, 

Accent the Antepenultimate, 
Jeh<5ahaz. 






OBSERVATIONS 

ON THE 

GREEK AJVD LATm 

ACCENT AND QUANTITY ; 

WITH SOME 

PROBABLE CONJECTURES 

\ 

©N 

THE METHOD OF FREEING THEM FROM THE OBSCURITY 
AND CONTRADICTXON IN WHICH THEY ARE IN- 
VOLVED, BOTH BY THE ANCIENTS AND MODERNS. 



*< Nulliitt addictus jnrare in verba magistri'" -Horace 



( «40 ) 



ADVERTISEMEJVr. 



After the many learned pens which .have been employed on 
the subject of the following Observations, the Author would have 
been much ashamed of obtruding his humble opinion on so deli- 
cate a point, had he not flattered himself that he had taken a ma- 
terial circumstance into the account, which had been entirely 
overlooked by ahnoiA cvety writer he had tnet with. 

It is not a Uttle astonishing, tliat, when the nature of the human 
voice forms so great a part of the inquiry into accent and quan- 
tity, its most n&arking distinctions should have been s6 little 
attended to. From a perusal of every writer on the subject,* 
one would be led to suppose that high and low, loud and soft, and 
quick and slow, were the only modifications of which the voice 
was susceptible ; and that the inflexions of the voice, which dis- 
tinguish speaking from singing, did not exist. Possessed, there- 
fore, of this distinction of sounds, the Author at least brings 
somethii^ new into the iniquiry : and if, even with this advantage, 
he shoidki fail of throwing light on the subject^ he is sure he 
shall be entitled to the indulgence of the learned, as they fully 
tinderstand the difficulty of the question. 

* Tlie 01115^ exception to this general assertion is Mr. Steele, the author of 
Prosodia RaAionalis ; but the design of this gentleman is not so. much to illu&tratft 
the accent aiid qtiaiifity of th& Greek laiigUage ad to prove the possibility of 
fora^ag a notation of speaking sounds for our own, and of reducing them to a 
musical scale, and accompanying them with instruments* The attempt is un* 
doubtedly laudable, but no farther useful than to show the impossibility of it by 
the very method he has taken to explain it; for it is wrapped up in such an im- 
penetrable cloud of music as to be unintelligible to any l)ut musicians ; and the 
distinctions of sound are so nice and numerous as to discourage the most perse- 
vering student from labouring to understand him. After all, what light can we 
expect will be thrown on this subject by one who, notwithstanding the infinites- 
umal distinctions he makes between similar sounds, says, that the u in uglyy and 
the e in met and get^ are diphthongs ; that the a in may is long, and the same let- 
ter in nation short ; and that the u in you^ use, Sec is tlways acuto-grave„ aud 
the t in idle, Iry, &c. grave^acute? 



( 241 ) 



CONTENTS. 



3: 



PKEPARATOtlY OBSEftVATIONS. 

iPAGi 

1 HE different states of the voice . . . • « .,...• 244 

A definition of accent .' .... 245 

All the different modifications of the voice exemplified .... 247 

OBSERVATIONS ON THE GREEK AND LATIN ACCENT AND 

• QUANTITY. 

The necessity of, understanding the accent and quantity of 
our otsm tanguase before we attempt to settle the accent 

and quantity of the Greek und Latin 251 

tVhat English quantity is . , . 252 

That it is entirely independent on accent • . . .^ ib. 

JIfr. Sheridan^ erroneous opinion of English accent 253 

His definition of accent applicable only to singing in a mo^ 

notone « « 255 

The true distinction between singing and speaking laid dawn ihi 
Singing and speaking tones as essentially distinct as motion 

and rest . « 4 . . . . < ', « iblt 

Recitative real singing, and not a medium between singing 

and speaking • ib. 

The true defiHition of English accent 256 

Mr. Forster's errour with respect to the nature of the English . 

and Scotch accent — (flote) 257 

The true difference between the English and Scotch accent . £6 1 
Some attempts to form a precise idea of the quanfity of the 

Greek and Latin languages 262 

Dr, Gally's idea of Oreek and Latin qtlantity examined . . 263 
If qiuintity in these languages consisted in lengthening or 
shortening the sound of the vowel, it necessarily rendered 
the pronunciation of words very different, as they were 

differently arranged 265 

Opposite opinions of learned men concerning the nature of 
the Greek And Latin accent ,.....,. t • . 266 



I 



242! CONTEf^T^. 

*AG£- 

The definition which the ancients give of the acuU accent 
unintelligible, without having recourse to the system of 
the inflexions of the speaking voice 269 

An attempt to reconcile the accent and quantity of the an- 
cientSf by reading a passage in Homer and virgil, ac- 
cording to the ideas of accent andquantity here laid down 273 

The only four possible ways of pronouncing these passages 
without singing 275 

The tmly probable method pointed out .• ib. 

This method renders the reading very monotonous; but this 
must necessarily be the case, let us adopt zohat ystem we 

will . . 4 ..*..... ' • ' • 274 

The definition of the circumflex accent, a cotvfirmation of 
the system here adopted ... ^ .....«* • %T5 

The monotony of the Greek and Latin languages not more 
extraordinary than the poverty of their music, and the 
seeming absurdity of their dramatic entertainments ...» 276 

Probable causes of the obscurity and confusion in which this 
subject is involved, both among the ancients and modems 283 



l^feE^AltATbKir 



(243) 



PREPARATORY OBSERVATIONS. 



^S a perusal of the Observations on Greek and Latin Accent 
and Quantity requires a more intimate acquaintance with the na- 
ture of the voice than is generally brought to the study of that 
subject^ it may not be improper to lay before the reader such an 
explanation of speaking sounds^ as may enable him to distinguish 
between high and loud, soft and low, forcibleness and length, 
and feebleness and shortness, which are so often confounded, and 
which consequently produce such confusion and obscurity among 
our best prosodists. 

But as describii^ such sounds upon paper as have no definite 
terms appropriated to them, like those of music, is a new and 
difiicult task, the reader must be requested to give as nice an at- 
tention as possible to those sounds and inflexions of voice, which 
spontaneously annex themselves to certain forms of speech, and 
which, from their familiarity, are apt to pas9 unnoticed. But if 
experience were out of the question, and we were only ac- 
quainted with the organic formation of human sounds, we must 
necessarily distinguish them int6 five kinds : namely, the monotone, 
or one sound continuing a perceptible time in one note, which b 
the case with all musical sounds; a sound beginning low and 
.ifliding h^her, or beginning high and sliding lower, without any 
perceptible intervals, which is essential to all speaking sounds. 
The two last may be called simple slides or inflexions ; and these 
may be so combined as to begin with that which rises, and end 
with that which falls, or to begin with that which falls, and end 

R 2 



244 PREPARATCyRY OBSERVATtONS. 

with that which rises : and if this combination of different in* 
flexions be pronounced with one impulse or explosion of the 
voice, it may not improperly be called the circumflex or com- 
pound inflexion; and this monotone, the two simple and the two 
compound inflexions, are the only modifications, independent on 
the passions, of which the human voice is susceptible. 

The different States of the Voice, 

The modifications of the voice which have just been enu- 
iherated may be called absolute ; because tl?ey cannot b<6 con- 
verted into' each other, but must remain decidedly what they are; 
while different states of the voice, as high and low, loud mid 
soft, quick and slow, are only comparative terms, since what is 
high m one case may be low in another, and so of tiie rest. Be- 
side, therefore, the modifications of voice which have been 
described, the only varieties remaining of which the human voice 
is capable, except those produced by the passions, are high, low, 
loud, soft, quick, slow, forcible, and feeble. Though high and 
loud, and low and soft, are frequently confounded, yet, when 
considered distinctly, their difference is easily understood; as, if 
we strike a large bell with a deep tone, though it gives a 
very loud tone, it will still be a low one; and if we. strike a 
small bell with a high tone, it will still be a high tonet, though the 
stroke be ever so soft ; a quick tone in music is that in which the 
same tone continues but a short time, and a '^low tone ^ere it 
continues longer ; but in speaking, a quick tone is that when die 
slide rises from low to high, or from high to low, in a short 
time, and a slow tone the reverse ; while forcible and » feeble 
seem to be severally compounded of two of these siniple states ; 
that is, force seems to be loudness and quicktiess, either in a 
l^igh or low tone also; and feebleness seems to be sofhiess 
and slowness, either ih ia high or a low tone likewise. As to the 
ione^of the passions, which are so many and various, these, 

"itf d» opiniou of one of the best judges in the kingdom, are 

5 



PREPARATORY OBSERVATIONS. t45 

qualities of sounds occasioned by certain vibrations of the organs 
of speech^v independent on high, low, loud, soft, quick, slow, 
forcible, or feeble ; which last may not improperly be called dif- 
ferent quantities of sound. 

It may not, perhaps, be unworthy of observation, how few are 
these principles, which, by a different combination ydiii each 
other> produce that almost unbounded variety of which human 
speech consists. The di&rent quantities of sound, as these dif- 
ferent states of the voice may be called, may be combined so as 
to form new varieties with any other diat are not opposite to 
th^m. Thus high may be combitied with either loud or soft, 
quick or slow ; that is, a h^h note may be sounded either in a 
loud or soft tone, and a low note may be sounded either in 
a loud or a soft tone also, and each of these tones may be pro- 
nounced either in a longer or a shorter time; that is, more 
slowly or quickly ; while forcible seems to imply a degree of 
loudness and quickness, and feeble, a degree of softness and 
slowness, either in a high or a low tone. These combinations 
may, perhaps, be more easily conceived by classing them.incoH* 
trast with each other : . 

High, loud, quick. 
JiOW, )5oft, slow. 

Forcible may be hi^h, loud, and quick ; or low, loud, and quick. 
Feeble may be high, softj, and slow ; or low, soft, and slow* 

The different combinations of these states may be thus reprcS- 
^ented: ; ' 

High, loud, qui<4c^ forcible. Low> loud, quick, forcible. 

High, loud, slow.' Low, loud, slow. 

High, soft, quick. Low, soft, quick. 

High, soft, slow, feeble. I^ow, soft, slow, feeble. 

When these states of the voice are combined with the fiye mo- 
difications of voice, above mentioned, the varieties become ef- 
oeedingly numerous, but far from being incalculable : perhaps 



U6 PREPARATOEY OBSERVATIONS. 

Aey may amount (for I leave it to arithmeticians to reckon thi^ 
exactly) tq that number into which the ancients distinguished 
the notes of music^ which, if I renjember right, were al^out two 
hundred. 

These different states of the voice, if justly distingui3hed and 
associated, may serve to throw ^ome light on the nature c^ 
accent. If, as Mr. Sheridan asserts, the accented syllable is only 
louder and not higher than the other syllables, every polysyllable 
is a perfect monotone. If the accented syllable be higher than 
the rest^ which is the general opinion both an^ong the ancient 
;and moderns, this is ti'ue only when a word is pronounced alone, 
and without reference to any other word ; for when suspended at 
a comma, concluding a negative member followed by an affirma- 
tive, or asking a question beginning with a verb ; if the un- 
accented syllable or syllables be the last, diey are higher than the 
accented syllable, though not so loud. So that the true definition 
of accent is this : If th^ word be pronounced alone, and mitk- 
out any reference to other ts)ord^, the, accented syllable is both 
higher and louder than the other syllables either before or after 
il ; but if the word be suspendedy as at the comma, if it end a 
negative member followed by an affirmative,- or if it conclude xzn 
interrogative sentence beginning with a verb, in each case the aC" 
cented syllable is louder and higher than the preceding, and 
louder and lower than the succeeding syllables. This will be suf- 
ficiently exemplified in the following pages. In the mean time 
h may be observed, that if a degree of swiftness enters into the 
definition ojf force, and that the accented syllable is the most for-* 
cible, it follows that the accent does not necessarily lengthen the 
9yllable, and that if it falls on a long vowel, it is only a longer 
continuation of that force with whict it quickly or suddenly coni- 
menced: for as the voice is an efi)ux of kir, and air is a fluid like 
water, we may conceive a sudden gush of this fluid to continue 
either a longer or a shorter time, and thence form an idea of 
long or short quantity. If, however, this definition of force, as 
applied to accent, should be erroneous or imaginary, let it be re-^ 



PREPARATORY OBSERVATIONS. WJ 

membered it is ,an a]ttem{it to form a precise idjejEi of what has H* 
Iherto been left in obscurity ; and that, if such an attempt should 
fail; it Biaj at least induce some curious inquirer to show where 
it fails; and to substitute something better in its stead. 

If these observations are just, they may serve to show how ill- 
founded is the opinion of that infinite variety of voice of which 
speaking sounds consist^ That a wonderful v^iety may arise 
from the key in which we spe^, from the force or feebleness 
with which vfe pronounce, apd from the tincture of passion or 
sentiment wp infuse into the words, is ackpo^ledged : but speak 
in what key we will, pronounce with what force or feebleuess we 
pl<5ase, and infuse whatever tincture of passion pr sentiment 
we cau iipagine into the words, still they piust necess?uily be pro^ 
nouuc<ed with one of the foregoing ipodifications of the voice. 
Jiet us go into whatever twists or zig-zags of tone we will, we 
cannot go out of the boundaries of these inflexions. These arp 
the outlines on which all the force and colouring of speech is 
laid ; and these may be justlv said to form the first principles of 
speaking sounds^ 



Exemplification of the different Modifications of the Voice, 
The Monotone, the Rising Inftexion, the Falling Ltflexionj 
the Rising Circuntflex, and the Falling Circumflex, 

Though we seldom hear such a variety in reading or speakmg 
as the sense and satisfaction of the ear demand, yet we hardly 
ever hear a pronunciation perfectly monotonous. In former 
times we might have found it in the midnight pronunciation of 
the Bell-man's verses at Christmas ; and now the Towncrier, 
as Shakspeare calls him, sometimes gives us a specimen of the 
monotonous in his vociferous exordium-^-" This is to give notice T 
The clerk of a court of justice also promulgates the will of the 
f ourt b^ tl)9t barbfU'ous metamorphosis of the old French woid 



C46 7RBPARAT0BY OBSERVATIONS 

Oyez! Oyez! Hear ye! Hear ye! into O yes! yes! in it 
perfect sameness of Voice. But however ridiculous Uie mono- 
tone in speaking may be in the above-mentioned characters^ in 
certain solemn and sublime passages in poetry it has a wonderfnl 
propriety, and, by the tmcommonness of its use, it adds greatly to 
that variety with which the ear is so much delighted. 

This monotone may be defined to be a continuation or sam^r 
ness of sound upon certain words or syllables/ exactly like tiiat 
produced by repeatedly striking a bell : such a stroke may be 
louder or softer, but continues in exactly the same pitch. To ex- 
press this tone, a horizontal line may be adopted ; such a one as 
is generally used to signify a long syllabliS in verse. This tone 
may be very properly introduced in some passages of Akenside's 
Pleasures of Imagination, where he so finely describes the 
tales of horrour related by the village niatron to her infant 
audience- 



Breathing astoi&hment! of witching rhymes 
And evil spirits ; of the death-bed call 
To him whot robb*d the widow, and devour*d 
The orphan's portion ; of unquiet souls 
Ris'n A'oiti the grave to ease the heavy guilt 
Of deeds in life conceal'd; of shapes that walk 
At dead of night, and clank thoir chains, and way« 
The t^rch of Hell around the murd'rer's bed. 



If the words " of shapes that walk at dead of night*? are pro- 
nounced in a monotone, it will add wonderfiilly to the varietj 
and solemnity of the passage. 

The risii^ inflexion is that upward turq of the voi^e we gene« 
rally use at the comma, or in asking a question beginnii^ with a 
verb, as N6, say you; did he say No i This is commonly caHed 
« suspension of voice,, and may not improperly be marked by the 
acute accent, thus (')• 

file falling inflexion is generally used ^t the semicolon ant| 



PREPABATORT OBSEEVATION^. S49 

coloii, and must necessarily be heard in answer to the former 
question: He did; he said N6. This inflexion, in a lower 
tone of voice, is adopted at the end of almost every sentenced, 
except the definite question, or that which begins with the 
verb. To express this inflexion, the grave accent seems adapted, 
thus C). 

The rising circumflex begins with the falling inflexion, 
and ends with the rising upon the same syllable, and seems 
as it were to twist the voice upwards. This inflexion may 
be exemplified by the drawling tone we give to some words 
spoken ironically; as the word Clodius in Cicero's Oration 
for Milo. This turn of voice may be marked in this man* 
Her (v): 

*^ But it is foolish in us to compare Drusus Africanus 
** and ourselves with Clodius; all our other calamities were 
" tolerable, but no one can patiently bear the death of 
'' ClJdius." 

^The falling circumflex begins with the rising inflexion, and 
^nds with the falling upon the same syllable, and seems to 
iwist the voice downwards. This inflexion seems generally to be 
used in ironical reproach ; as on the word you in the following 
example : 

" So then yoA are the author of this conspiracy against me ? 
^' It is to yodthat I ani indebted for all the mischief that has 
" befallen me.*' 

If to these inflexions we add the distmction of a phrase intp 
accentual portions, as 

Prosperity | giins friends [ and adversity | tries them, | 
and pronounce/riewds like an unaccented syllable of gains; and 
like an unaccented syllable of adversity; and them lil^e an unac- 
cented syllable of tries; we have a clear idea of the relative 
forces of all the syllables, and approximate closely to a notation . 
.of speaking sounds. 



•50 PREPARATORY OBSERVATIONS. 

For fiEurther information respecting this new and ciirioiis 
analysis of the human voice, see Elements of Elocution, second 
edition, page 62; and Rhetorical Grammar, third editioo, 
page 143. 



OBSERVATJP'KS 



r: •■•■"• i f 851 ^ r-'2 



i 851 ) 



PBSERVATIONS 

r 



ON THE 



f^JREEK AJfD LATW JCCEJVT, ^c. 



J. In order to form an idea of the Accent and Quantity of the 
dead languages, it will be necessary first to understand what we 
mean by the accent and quantity of our own language :^ and 
as quantity is supposed by some to regulate the accent in 

* It is not purprisiDg, that tl^e acQent and qaanttty of the ancients should be^ 
so obscure and mysterious, wl^en two ^uch learned men of our own nation as 
Mr. Forster and Dr. Gaily differ about the very existence of quantity in our 
own language. The former of these gentlemen maintains, that *^ the English 
'<< have both accent and quaiitity, and that no language can be without them -*' 
but the latter asserts, that, f in the modem languages, the pronunciation doth 
^' not depend upon a natural quanti^, and therefore a greater liberty may be 
f< allowed in the placing of accents." And in another place, speaking of tiie 
northern languages of Europe, he says, that ** it was made impossible to think 
f' ofestablishing quantity for a foundation of harmony in proihipciation. Hence 
^ it became necessary to lay aside the consideration of quantity, and to have 
^ recourse to accents. Iii these and some other passages, that writer," says 
Forster, '' teems to look upon apcents as alone regulating the pronunciation of 



OBSl^RVATIONS ON THE 

Ei^Iish as well as in Greek and Latin, it will be necessary first 
to inquire, what we mean by long and short vowels^ or^ as some 
pre pFeased to term them, syllables. 

£. In English, then, we have no conception of quantity aris-' 
ing from any thing but the nature of the vowels, as they are pro*- 
Doonced long or short Whatever retardation^ of voice ill the 
sound of a vowel there might be in Greek or Latin before two 
consonants, and those often twin consonants, we find every 
vowel in this situation as easily pronounced short as long ; and 
the quantity is found to arise from the length or shortness we give 
to the vowel, and not from any obstruction of sound occasioned 
by the succeeding consonants. Thus the a in bctfiish, banner, 
mod banter, is short in all these words, and long in paper, taper, 
and vapour: the i long in misery minor, and wwVre, and short in 
misery, middle, and mistress : and so of the rest of the vowels ; 
and though the accent is on tlie first syllable of all these -words, 
we see it perfectly compatible with either long or short quantity^ 

3. As a farther proof of tliis, we may obsene, that unac-p 
cented vowels are frequently pronounced long when the accented 

lawels are diiort. Thus the o in Cicero, in English as well as ia 
liatin pronunciation, is long, though unaccented ; and the i shorty 



^ Eagli^, and quantity 98 excluded from it" — Forstei^'s Esic^y on Ai^ent aiv$ 
QiaiMHty^ page i^a. 

As a farther proof of the total Mrant of ear in a great Greek scholar — Lord Mon* 
|iodda says, *^ Our accents differ from the Greek in two material respects ; 
** First, they are not appropriated to particular syllables of the word, but art 
^ laid upon different syllables, according to tiie fancy of the speaker, or rather 
** as it hs^>pens : for I believe no man speaking English does, by choice, give 
^ sm accent to one syllable of a word different from that which he gives t6 
•* another.*' 

^ TwQ things, therefore, that, in my opinion, constitute our verse, are the 
^ number of syllables, and the mixture of loud add soft, according to certain . 
f^ rules. As to quantity, it is certainly not essential to our verse, and' far les$ if 
« f^ccent'^ See Steele's Protodia RaticruUia, page 103* Up. 



GR£E1C AND LATIN ACC«Nt, ^ £55 

AiOugh under the accent. The same may Be observed of iSbm 
name of our English poet Lillo, So in our English words cSn* 
clave f reconcile, chamomile, and the substantives cSt^e, per-' 
fume, and a thousand oth^^^ we see die first accented syllable 
shorty and the final unaccented syllable long. Let those who 
contend that the acute accent and long quantity are inseparabk 
call the first vowels of these words long, if they please, but to 
those who make their ear and not their eye the judge of quantity^ 
when compared with the last voweb, diey will always be 
esteemed short * 

• 4. The next object of inquiry is, What is the nature of 
English accent? Mr. Sheridan,*^' widi his usual decision, telb 
us^ that accent is only a greater force upon ohe s^'llable thaa 



* A late very learned and ingenious writer tells us, that our accent and 
quantity always coincide ; he objects to himself the words signify^ magmfy^ 
iutUi/jf, &:c., where the final syllable is longer than the accented syllalbfe; btit 
this he asterts, with the greatest probabUity, was not the accentuatioti or4Mn' 
ancestors, who placed tiie accent on the last syllable, which is naturaUy tib^ 
longest. But this sufficiently proves, that the accent does not necessarily 
len^en the syllable it falls on ; that is, if length consists in pronouncing the 
vowel long, which is the natural idea of long quantity, and not the duradoa 
of the voice upon a short vowel occasioned by the retardation of sounding two 
succeeding eonsonants, which is an idea, though sanctioned by antiquity, that 
lias no foundation in nature ; for who, that is not prejudiced by early opinkn^ 
can suppose the first syllable of eUfow to be long, and the last short i—See Esatf 
•ft Greek and Latin Prosodies, — Printed for Robson. 

t The term (accent) with us has no reference to inflexioin of the voice or 
musical notes, but only means a peculiar manner of distinguishing one syllable 
of a word firom tiie rest. — Lectures on Elocution^ quarto edition, page 41. 

To illustrate the difference between the accent of the ancients and that of 
ours, (says Mr. Sheridan,) let us suppoise the same movements beat qpon Uie 
drum, and sounded by the trumpet Take, for instance, a succession of 
words, where the accent is on every second syllable, which foram an Iambic 
movement; tiie only ¥ray by which a drum (as it is incapable of any change 
'•f aotM), saa mdrk that .movement, ii by striking a soft note first, ftllowsi 



iS4 



OBSEitTl^tlONS OR TRS 



another, without any relation to the elevation or depr^oft 
of the voice ; while almost every other v^'riter oi^ die subject 
makes the elevation or depression of the voice inseparaUe frons 
accent. When virords are pronounced in a monotone^ a^ the- 
bellman repeats his verses, the crier pronounces his advertisement^ 
or the clerk of a church gives out tlie psalm, vire hear an ictus or 
accentual force upon thQ several 'accented syllables, which distin- 
guishes them from the others, but no more variety of tone than 
if we were to beat the syllables of the same words upon a drum> 
which may be louder or softer, but cannot be either higher 
or lower ; this is pronouncing according to Mr. Sheridan's defi- 
nition of accent : and this pronunciation certainly comes under 
the definition of singing : it is singing ill, indeed, as Julius Caesar 
said of a bad reader, — but still it is singing, and therefore essen- 
tially different from speaking; for in speaking, the voice is con- 
tinually s/u^/ng upwards or downwards ; and in singii^, it is leap-^ 
tug, as it were, from a lower to a higher, . or from a higher to a 
lower note : the only two possible ways of varying the human 
voice with respect to elevation or depression : so that when we 
are told by some writers on dib subject, that the speaking of the 



by one more forcible, and so in succession. Let the same movement be 
■onnded by the trumpet in an alternation of high and low notes, and it wiU give 
a distinct idea of ^e difference between the English accent and those of th% 
ancients. — Art qf ^adingf page 75. 

I am sorry to find one of the most ingenious, learned, and csmdld iaqairers 
into this subject, of the saime opinion as Mr. Sheridan. The authority of Mr. 
Nares would have gone near to shake my own opuuon, if I had not recollected^ 
that this gentleman confesses he cannot perceive the least of a dif^thongiil 
sound in the t in strike^ which Dr. Wallis, he observes, excludes from the sim- 
ple sounds of the vowels. For if the definition of a vowel sound be, Uiat it is 
formed by one position of the organs^ nothing can be more perceptible tinui 
the double position of them ui the present case, and that the noun eye, lAMn 
isjperfectly equivalent;;to the pronoun /, begins with the sound of a in father, 
and ends in that of « m eqval.-^S^ Nares's Englitti Orthoepy^ page 3. 144. 



GAEfik AUb LATIN ACCENT. tSS 

tuitieiits was a kind of singing; we are led into the errour of sup^ 
posing; that singing and speaking differ only in degree^ and not m 
kind ; whereas they site just dd difiidrent a^ inotion and rest."*^ 

6. Whenever ii| speaking we adopt a singing tone, (which was 
formerly the case with Puritan preachers^) it differs essentially 
from speakii^; and can b^ pricked down upon paper, and bo 
played upon a violin : and whenever in singing we adopt a speak<< 
ing tone, the slide of this tone is so essentially distinct from 
singii^ as to shock the ear like ike harshest discord. Those^ 
therefore, who rank recitative as a medium between sbging and 
speaking, wre utterly ignorant of the nature of both. Recitative 
is just as much singing as what is called air^ or ady other species, 
of musical composition. 

. 6. If we may have recourse to the eye, the iiiost distinct and 
definite of all our senses, we may define musical notes to be ho-» 
rizontal lines, and speaking tones oblique lines : the one rise» 
from low to high, or falls from high to low by distinct inter- 
vals, as the following straight lines to the eye; — — 



— —— — — -^- ■ ■ - - - "" -' ■ . r .. ■ .^__ ^.. . .^.^ 



* It it not denied, that the slides in Speaking inajr loihetinies lea)) ^ as it were^ 
ftmn a low to a hig(h, or from a high to a low note ; that is, that &ere may be 
a very <ionsiderabl« interval between the end of one of those slides and the be- 
ginning of another; as between the high note in the word 110 in the question^ 
JMhe wiyNo? and the low note which the same word may adopt in the an- 
swer, Noy he did not. But the sound Which composes the note of speaking, as 
it may be called, and the sound which Composes the note of singing, are essen- 
tinlly distinct ; the former U in conthraal motion, while the latter is for a gif w 
time at rest-^See Note to sect. U3. 



5256 OBSERVATIONS ON THE 

the other slides upwards or downwards, as the foUQwiii^ ob* 

lique lines ; y ^v nor is die one more different to the eye 

than the other is to the ear. Those, therefore, who gravely tell . 
us, that the enunciation of the ancients was a kind of muncal 
speakii^, impose upon us with words to which we can aimex no 
ideas; and when they attempt to illustrate this musico-speaking 
pronunciation, by referrii^ us to the Scotch and other dia« 
lects, they give us a rhetorical flourish instead of a real ex-»^ 
ample: for however the Scotch and other speakers may 
drawl out the accent, and give the vowel a greater length 
than the English, it is always in an oblique, and not in < 
a stra^ht line; for the moment the straight line of sound, or 
the monotone, is adopted, we hear something essentially distinct 
from speaking. 

7. As h^h and low, loud and soft, forcible and feeble, are 
comparative .terms, words of one syllable ' pronounced alone, 
and without relation to other words or syllables, cannot be said 
to have ai^ accent."^ Th^ only distinction to which such 
words are liable, is an elevation or depression of voice, when 
we compare the beginning with the end of the word or syllable. ^ 
Thus a monosyllable, considered singly^ rises from a lower to 
a higher tone in the question No? which may therefore be 



* How the ancients could make every monosyllable accented, (that ii, ac- 
cording to their definition of accent, pronounced with an elevated tQue of 
Toice,) without telling us how this elevation happened, whether it was an ele- 
yation of one part of tiie syllable above the other, or the elevation of one word 
or syllable abo^e other words or syllables, — how these distuictlons, 1 say, sa 
absolutely necessary to a precise idea of accent, should never be once men* 
tioned, can be resolved into nothing but that attachment to words without 
ideas, and that neglect of experiment, which hava involved the modcrai ia the 
same mist of ignorance and errour. 



6R1EK AND. LATIN ACCENT. UT. 

Called die acute accent^ and fells from a higher to a lower tone 
upon the same word m the answer Nd, which may therefore be 
called the grave« But when the accented word or syllable is 
associated with unaccented words or 8yllables> the acute accent 
is louder and higher than the preceding, and louder and lower 
tlian the succeeding syllables, as in the question, Satisfactorily 
did he say? and the grave accent both louder and higher than 
either the preceding or succeeding syllables in the answer — 
He said satisfactorily. Those who wish to see this explained 
more at large may consult Elements of Elocution, page 183 ; or. 
Rhetorical Grammar^ Sd edit, page 77. 

8. This idea of accent is so evident upon experiment, as to 
defy contradiction ; and yet, such is the general ignorance of 
the modifications of the voice, that we find those who pretend 
to explain the nature of accent the most accurately, when they 
give us an example of the accent in any particular word, suppose 
it always pronounced affirmatively and alone ; * that is, as 
if words were always pronounced with one inflexion of voice, 



* That excellent scholar Mr. Fonter fiiniidies an additional instance of tiie 
possibility of muting a deep and accurate knowledge of what is caUed the pro- 
sody of the ancients with a total ignorance of the accent and quantity of lus own 
language. After a thousand examples to show how the English is susceptible of 
every kind of metre among the ancients, (though m all his examples he substi* 
iutes English aceent for preek and Latin ^waUity) he proceeds to show the dif- 
ference between the English, the lirish, and the Scotch pronunciation. 

^ The English join the acute and long time together, as in ix'ierty : y short. 
f^TheScptch observe our quantity, and alter our accent, liA^y'; yshiMt. 
^ When I say they obserte our quantity, I mean th^ prooooKe the same syl- 
^ lable long which we do, but they make it longer. Li respect to the drcum 
<* flcx-with which their pronunciation abounds : it may be remised, tliac it isi 
^ not formed M the Greek, Latin, and English, of an acute and grave^ b«Aof a 
M gia^and acate, i^, rds, r6dnd, Eng^sh ; rd^nd, Scotch. 

** The Irish obtenrc our quantity and accent too, but with a greaterdegree of 

'' spirit 

S 






Ui - . eBlEftVATlOirS ON TH9 

lid as if iintm were ho difference with respect to the nature of 
ibb ac^eat, whether lihe word is an affirmation or a questioii, 
in one part of the sentence, or in another : when nothii^ can 
ke moiae palpaUe to a correct ear than that the accents of the 



» . 



^ spirit or emphasis, which Scaliger calls ajflatio in latitudiney ^ving tm 
** most syllables- an aspiration.'*— Esm^ on Accent and Quantity, page 75. 

Mr. Forster falls exactly into the mistake ot Mr. Sheridan, thou^ he has m 
qnite different idea of accent. He supposes liberty always prononaced by 
an Englishman in one manner, and that as a single word, or at the end of a 
sentence : he has not the least notion of the different inflexion the same word 
may have accordingly as the accent is differently inflected, as we may plainly 
fferceive in die following question : Is it liberty or licentiousness yon plead forl^ 
where the English raise the voice on the latter syllables, as the Scotch teo fre^ 
^pMntly do. With respect to the quantity of the first syllable, whidi Mr* 
Forster says the Scotch preserve in this word, I must dissent fi'om him totally ; 
fbr they preserve the accent, and alter the quantity, by pronouncing the first 
syllable as if written leeberty. If Mr. Forster calls this syllable long in the 
English pronunciation of it, I should be glad to be told of a shorter accented 
syllable than thtf first of liberty : if he says the accent being on it renders It 
Itag^ I answer tins subverts his whole system ; for if accent, falling on any 
YSwel, makes it long, the quantity of the Greek and Latin is avertomedj and 
etmo^ in the first fine of the ^eid, must be a spondee. 

'This is the consequence of entering on the discussion of a cHfficnlt poinV 
widiont first defining the terms;— notiiing but confusion and contradiction can 
ensue. 

BntI most give this writer great credit for his saying the Scotch preinmcia^' 
tion abounds witb tiie circumflex ; for this is really the case ; and tht vtrf ' 
Gurcumflex opposite 1M> the Greek andHLatins, beginning with the grore and 
ending ^th the acute. I am not, however, a littie astonished that tMs^did not 
show him bow defici^it the ancients were in this modification of the voice ; wfaicfaft 
though used too frequentiy in Scotland, ift just as much in the human voice ak 
the other cvcumflex; and may be, and is often, used in Englandt with theiit- 
tmmX propriety. With respect to the common circumflex on Greek, Ltttin» and 
sopM Fr^chwordS) the accentual useof it is quite unknown, and it on(y stanfit 



GKEEK AND LATIN ACCEMT. 35^ 

word voluntary in the following scatences ai% essentially different: 

Hia resignation was vH/untaiy. 
He made a bliluntary Tesignation. 

Ih both, the accent is on the first syllable. In the first sentence, 
the accented syllable is higher and louder tlian the other sylla-. 
bley ; and in the second, it is louder aiid lower than the rest; 
The same may be observed of the following question : 

Was his res^ation vuliintary or i»volu»ta?]/'f 

where the first syllabic of the word voluntary ia louder and^ 
lower than llie succeeding syllables ; and in the word involnn- 
tary it is louder and higher. Those who have not ears suf- 
ficiently ilelicate to discern this ditference, ought never to ppeft 
their lips about tlie acute or grave accent, as they are pleased to 
call them ; let them speak of accent as it relates to stress only, 
and not to elevabon or depression c^ voice, and then they may 
speak intelligibly. 

9. A want of this discernment has betrajed Mr. Foratcr 
into obscurity and contrathction. To say nothing of his asserting' 
that the English, Irish, and Scotch accents differ, (where accent 
cannot possibly mean stress, for then English verse would not 
be verse iu Ireland and Scotland) what shall we think of his 



fbr loDg qiioBlk]' ; but both thqse nreiiinfleiies are dsmoDitralily upon tbe 
bumaa voice in speaking, and may be ma<lc as evident by expeitment a& Ihe- 
alreu of an accentei) ayllaLle by pfxiDetincing tlie word OD wbidi it a placed.— 
Se« Kittarical Grttiamar, 3d edit. if»ffi SO. 

1 iniist jum i»kc notice af the inaccaraoy of Mr. Fonter in saying tbe last 
syllable o( tibtrty a nhort, and yet tbat it has the eircumflex accent: tbisi* 
contrary to all tbc prosody of anUi|uity, and cootrary to the truth of tlie case 
ia Uns iintance; for it i^ the lenglh^f the lirst syllable, ariMug iroqi the oir-' 
Stx OB it, wbtch distiuiaiihcs the Scutch ii om the English prqaunciaft))!. 



860 bBStRVAflONS ON THE 

telling lis, that in Ei^land wle pronounce the ^ord majesty^ 
with an acute accent, and long quantity upon the first syllable^ 
and the two last syllables with the grave accent and short quan- 
tity ; and that in Scotland this wotd is pronounced with a grave 
accent, and long quantity on the first syllable, and with an 
acute accent and short quantity on the last ? Now, if by ac- 
cent is meant stress, nothing is more evident than that the Eng- 
lish and Scotch, with the exception of very few words, place die 
accent on the same syllable ; but if elevation be included in the 
idea of accent, it is as evident that the Eqglish pronounce the 
first syllable louder and higher than the two last, when tfiey 
pronounce the word either singly, or as ending a sentence ; as^ 

He spoke against the king's majesty : 

and louder and lower than the two last when it is the last acf 
cented word but one in a sentence, as, 

He spoke against the majesty of the king : 

or when it is the last word in asking a question, beginning with a 
ytrb, as^ . 

Did he dare to speak against tlie king's majesty?' 

» . ■ . . . .' • - 

10. Where then is the difference, it will be asked, between 
(he English and Scotch pronunciation? I answer, precisely in 
tbffi; that the Scotch are apt to adopt the rising circumflex anc) 
Ibhg quantity where the English use the simple rising inflexion 
and sliort quantity. Thus in the word majesty, as weU as in 



* Would not acB^ one suppose, that, by Mr. Forster^s producing tliis word aT 
^meJoiiBple of the English accent, that the English aiways^ pronounced it one 
way, and that as if it ended a declarative sentence ? lliis is exactly like tfa«r 
■ustsdio of PHsdni in- the word Aoittro.— See sect 20, in the Notes. 



GRE£K AND LATIN ACCENT. €l6c 

tvery 6ther of (the same form, they generally adopt die rising 
inflexicHiy as ia die two last sentences, whether it ends a que»« 
tioo beginning with a verb, as, *^ Is this the picture of his 
majesty V or whether it ends an affirmative sentence, as '' This 
is the picture of his majesty ^ And it is the prevalence of 
this long quantity with the rising inflexion that forms the piin- 
<ipal difference between the English and Scotch pronuncia- 
tion^ 

11. Having thus endeavoufed to ascertaio the accent and quan- 
tity of our own language, let us kiext inquire into the nature of tfie 
accent and quantity of the anciepts*'^ 

12. The long quantity of the ancients must arise either from 
a prolongation of the sound of the vowel, or from that delay of 
voice which the pronunciation of two or more consonants in 
succession are supposed naturally to require. Now vowels 



* So miueh are the eritlcs puazled to reconcile the tragic and comic verses of 
the ancients to the laws of metre, that a learned writer in the Monthly Reviewy 
for May 1762, speaking of the corrections of Dr. Heath, in his notes or read- 
ings of the old Greek tnigedians, says » ■> 

<< These Emendations are much more excusable than such as are made merely 
i* for the sake of the metre, the rules of which are so extremely vague and sa^ 
<< rious, as they are laid down by the metrical critics, that we will venture to 
*i say, any chapter in Robinsim Crusoe might be reduced to measure by them, 
<< This is not conjecture j the thing shall be proved. 

'^ As I was mmmag^ about her, lambicus dimeter hypercatdUduM 

*• I found Several . Xhchmama 

** Things that I wanted, Dttctyliau dimeter 

•* A fire-shovel and tongs, Dochmaicui ex epitrito quarto et syUaba 

•* Two brass kettles,. Dochinaicus 

'* A pot to make chocolate, Periodus brachycatalectui 

** Some horns of fine gla^dpowder, Euripideua 

♦• A gridiron, and seve Dactylica petUhimi9iurii 

^ Ral other neccssi^riet, — i Bofu anafastiftteum iyUabot'* 



i 



^{fibre skiti t^ ht i^ther long by nature, or Idng by posidcm. 
Thc0e long by nature* were ^ch as were long, though succeeded 
by a single ccmdonant, as the t^ in natura, and were a sort of 
4^xc^ptioti to the general rule ; for a vowel before a single conso- 
jMuit Was commonly short, as in every u in the word tumtdm. 
Thofee vowels which were lotig by position were such as were 
succeeded by two or more consonants, as the first o in spomor r 
but if the long and short quantity of the ancients was the same 
distinction of the sound of the vowel as we make in the words 
Jtadence and magic, calling the first a long, and the second aiioit, 
then the a in mater and paterf must have been pronounced 
like our a in later and latter ; and those vowels which were 
long by position, as the a in Bacchus and campus, must have 
fceeki sounded by the ancients as we hear them in the EiigliA 
'WcMrds bake and came. 

13. If therefore the long quantity of the ancients was no 
more than a retardation of voice on tlie consonants, or that du* 
ration of sound which an assemblage of consonants is supposed 
naturally to produce without makbg any alteration in the ^und 
of the vowel, such long quantity as this an English ear has not 
the least idea of. Unless the sound of the vowel be altered, 
we have not any conception of a long or short syllable ; and the 



* If the longiqaantity of the >Gredc and Latin arose natnraUy. from them- 
tardation of sound occasioned by the -succeeding consonants, the long voweli 
in this situation ought to have been tenned long by naturef and those long voUreli 
¥^hich come before 4single consonants should have been called long by custom : 
since it was nothing Jrat custom made the vowel e in decua (lioufour) ^hort, and 
in dedo (to give) long^ and the vowel o in ovum (an egg) long, and in ovo (to 
triumph) short. 

^ I do not here enter into the question concerning the ancient sound of the 
jAtina, which I unconvinced was like our a in water; but whether it Waf 
iike the a in paper^ father, or water, is not of any importance in the present 
queition -, the quantity is the same^ supposing it to have been aiiy one of thenu 



I nor c 



first syllables of bamsk, banner, and banter, have, lo our Mrs, 
exactly the same quantity. 

14. But if the long quantity of the ancienta arose naturally 
from the obstruction the voice meets with in die pronunciation 
of two or more consonants, how <loes it happen that the preced- 
ing consonants do not lengtlien the vowel as much as those 
which succeed f* Dr. Gaily tells ns, tlie reason of this is, 
*' that the vowel being the most essential part of die syllable, 
the voice hastens to seize it ; and, in order to do this, it slurs 
over all the consonants that are placed before it, bo that the 
voice suffers little or no delay. But die case of the consonant 
that follows is not tlie same : it cannot be slurred over, but 
iinust be pronounced ftill and distinct, otherwise it would rua 
ito and be confounded with die following syllable. By this 
lean the voice is delayed more in the latter than in the former 
of the syllable, and vr' is longer than rrfa, and „, loiter 

I must own myself at a loss to conceive the force of this rea- 
: I hart always supposed the consonant, when it forms 
part of a syllable, to be as essential to its sound as the vowel 
nor can I conceive why llie latter consonants of a syllable may 
)t be pronounced as rapidly as the former, without running the 
syllable into the latter, and thus confounding them 
ither ; since no such confiision arises when we end the firel 
syllable with the vowel, and begin the following syllable with 
die consonants, as •pro-crastmo, pro-straOts, &c. as in thb case 
there is no consonant to stop the first syllable, and prevent its 
running into the second; ip that Dr. Gaily seems to have 
slurred over the matter rather than to have explained it : but as 
he is the only writer who has attempted to account for the man- 



" IMssertatloa agaimt pronouncing the Greek Uingutige according lo Ao- 
— piaaert, ii. page jO, seeand editwa. . 




OBSEKV&TIOKS OJJ THE 

ner in wliieh quantity is produced b; consonants, lie is entitled to 
ulteiition. 

15. In tlie first place, then, in words of more than one sylla- 
ble] but one consonant can belong to the preceding vowel, as the 
others must necessarily be considered as belonging t • the succeed- 
ing vowel, and, according to Dr. Gaily, must be hurried over, 
that the voice may seize its favourite letter. As one consonant, 
therefoie, does not naturally produce long quantity, where is llie 
delay if the other consonants are hurried over^ and, consequently, 
where is the long quanlity which the delay is supposed to pro- 
duce i I'liis is UKe adding two nothings together to produce a 
sometliing. 

16. But what does he mean by the necessity there is of pro- 
nouncing the latter consonant fidl and distinct, that it may not 
run into and be confounded with the following syllable ? Must 
not every consonant be pronounced full and distinct, whether 
we pronounce it rapidly or slowly, wheliier before or after the 
vowel i Is not the itr in slramen pronounced as full and dis- 
tinct as the same letters in caitra, castramefor? &c. 1 know 
there is a shadow of difference by pronouncing the vowel in pur 
short English manner so as to unite with the £, as if wTitt^D 
cass; but if we make the preceding vowel long, as in case, 
and, according to the rules of syllabication laid down by Ramus, 
Ward, an4 the Latin gramm^iaiis, carry the consonanlf to ibe 
succt'cdir^ syllable, as if writleQ cay-slraif, we ^nd these con- 
sonants pronounced exactly in the same manner : and tins legds 
us to suppose that double consoniuits were the signs only, and 
BOt die efficients of long quantity ; and that this same lotig 
quantity was not simply a duration of sound upon the con- 
Gonaptg, but exactly what we call loqg qiiantity— a lengthenipg 
of the sound by pronouncing the vowel open, as if we were to 

. pronounce the a long in mater, by sounding it as if written may- 
tvi and the same letter shortin^afer, as if it were written paHer.* 



GREEK AND LATIN ACCENT. < 

' 17. The reason of our repugnance to admit of this analogy of 
quantity ill the learned languages is, that a diametrically oppo- 
site analt^ has been adopted in tlie English, and, I believe, 
most modura tongiies~an analogy which makes the vowel long 
before one consonant, and short before more than one. 

18. If, however, the quuntity of the aiicicnts lay only in the 
vowel, which was lengthened and shortened in our manner by- 
altering the sound, how straiige muat have been their poetical 
language, and how different from die words taken singly ! Thua 
the word »ec, which, taken singly, must have been pronomiced 
with the vowel short, like our English word neck — in composi* 
lion, as in the line of Virgil, where it is long. 

" Fulgnra, nee diri toties arsfere comets." 

TTiis word must have been pronounced as if written tieek ; ju*t 
as differently as the words proper, of', mankind, >s, and vian, i 
tlie line of Pope, would be pronounced by the same rule, 

" The proper study of mankind is man j" 

and as if written, 

" 'Ilie propeer study ove mane-kind ees mane" 

len to Ais alteration of the quantity, by the means ofsucceet 
ing consonants, we add Uiul rule 



m .and: 

^■TdOBbl 



' Finalem cKsui-a brevem producere gaudet," 

ibltiil vowels, m they nrc callcil ; tbnt is, such at come before a mntc auila 
tiie first a iu psfriu, the e in refiuii, inc. ; m \a these worils tUe vowel' 
tcilbg the iDUte and liquid a eitlisr long or short, as the writer or (jieaku 
pttaseis to make it ; but if tbc ConMnaotB naturally retarded ttae goud-I of ^M 
syllablp. io as to make it loug, binr could iJiia be? IT the syllable nag lu | 
made long, iliil l}ie speaker dwell longer on tlicranjananls,andirit was to t 
■nude sliut, did be hun> ilicm over? And did iliis make tbc (liirci«iii;e iu d 
.((uantity ortlwsesyllablu?— The utter iuipoisihUity of conceiving' ihislohai 
Hie COM TUid«» it bigiil; probable Ibat the lone or »hon quantity Uy oB 



OBSEBVATIOJJS ON THE 

vbich makes Ihe short or doubtful vowel long, that cither iiOv 
medinely precedes the csEsura, or concludea "the hexameter 
Terae — whnt inuHt be our astoniahmeiit at this very different 
sound of the worda arising merely from a different collocation 
of tbem, and at the strange variety and ambiguity to the ear llm 
difference must occasion !* 

1 9. But if this system of (luantity among the ancients appears 
strange aud unaccountable, our wonder wilt uot be diminished 
M'hen when we inquire into the nature of their accent. 

20. From what has been said of accent and quantity in our 
own iai^uage, we may conclude them to be essentially distiiici 
and perfectly separable; nor is it to be'doubted that they were 
equally separable iu the leamed languages: instances of this 
from the scholiasts and commentators are innumerable; but so 
loose and indefinite are many of their expressions, so little do 
they seem acquainted witli the analysis of the humait voice, 
fliat a great number of quotations are produced to support tlie 
most opposite and contradictory systems. Tlius Vossius, Hen- 
niiiius, and Dr. Gaily, produce a great number of quotations 
which seem to confound accent and quantity, by making the 
acute accent and long quantity signify the same; White, 
Michaelis, Melanclhon, Forster, Primat, and many other men 
of learning, produce clouds of wimesscs from the ancients to 
j^ove that accent and quantity are essentially different.-f- The 



■ Sec this idea of the different sonnd of wordn, when taken singly, and when 
ta compoiition, muEt excellently treated by the aathor of the Greek and Latin 
Proiodies, Bttribatedta the |>resent Bishop of St, Asaph, page 101. 

t It ia not astODighing tliat leamed men will wranRle v]& each other Ht 
wliote pa^ei ahont tile senae ofii word in Dionysius of HBlieamasaas, ttpon tb« 
^(fcrenee betweeD sinRini! and RpeuUng sonnds, when tliu difference t» just u 
m by experiment as il was lo liira. Who can lufficiently admire the 
■e of Isaac Vosmub, who saj's — " In cantn latiiis cvuguri sonos, qnam iu 
tatloae sut comnium icrmone, u^iute in qao vitioruui Uabentar, m hox 

-nm 




the 
^' if w 

K-' 



GRinECJtTfS LATIN ACCFKT. 

ily thing th^ seem to agree in ia, that the acute accent ah(» 

vuises the sellable on which it U i>laced higher than any other i 

the word.* This is certainly true, in English pronunciutioq 

if we pronounce the word singly, and terminate it as if no othei 

ire to /otlow ; but if we pronounce it in a sentence, where i 

the last accented wonl but one, or where it is at the end of | 

leslion beginning with a verb when we suapeud the voice if 

expectation of an answer, we then tind the latter syllables a 

the word, though unaccented, arc pronounced higher than Uu 

accented sylkble in the former part of the word. — See No. ?■ 

'Zi, But wiiat are we to think of their saying, that evei^ 

lonosyllable is either acuted or circuniflexcdr+ If the aculi 

icent signifies an elevation of voice, this, with respect to wordj 



Poltra (/lupcnie sen tres tonos el semilpniuin, aenatnr," Insingine;, llje rou 
■ larger compass thao in rtadin^ or common spnkhi^, ioMmuch thai, 
biimon diacoiii^ wlialever is bigUi^r than the dhpriiic a lield U> Ik eKtremdr 



^ " Thns Prigcian. " In iina(]Haqiic pniic orationis orsi 
"Imc parte nalum: nt qiiajnio dica natii, elcvatur i 



ft fAct 



ml valnt la 



" qnandn vcro ra tteprimilui' vox M est thealt," Any one troald concladc 
this deMi-iptiaa of Uie rUuig aiii raUioE af tlie voice upon tliu nord, that {| 

^^^^could only be pronounced one way, and Ant there was no difference 

^^^Humpaialive height of Ihe vowel n in the two falluwiiie 

^^^H^ereas it 'a evident that the worii natvnt is iiuceptible of two d! 
P^^^^ntciatiniKt -. in tlie liist Kuttuce the syllable la is loudei' and liigli 
I lati i and in the second it is luuder and lower Hun tile lail : anil tliLi caiiToimdi 

iog of loud witli high, and lot) i*ilh low, wcins lo be the great&luiubliog- 

both of HucIeuU and moderns. — See No. 7, G, itc. 



•tEavi 



it syibliic unim eaiot acuta wit iexa ; on lit atiq«a 



268 OBSERVATIONS ON THE 

of one syllable) must mean elevated above some otfaei^ word 
either preceding or succeeding, since elevation is a mere com- 
parative word; but this is not once mentioned by them: if it 
has any meaning, therefore, it must imply that the acute accent 
IS the monosyllable, pronounced with, what I ^ould call, die 
rising inflexion or uptmrd thde; and then we can comprehend 
how a monosyllable may have the acute accent without refer- 
ence to any other word; as when we begin a syllable low, and 
dide it higher, or b^in it high, and slide it lower, it may be 
said to be acute or grave of itself; that is, when it is pronounced 
alone, and independent of other words. Unless we adopt this 
definition of the acute and grave, it will be impossible to con- 
ceive what the old grammarians mean when they speak of a 
monosyllable having the grave or the acute accent. Thus Di- 
omedes says on some words changing their accent — ^^ Si, po&t 
** adverbium cum gravi pronunciatur accentu, erit praepositio; 
.** si acuto erit adverbium, ut longo post tempore veni^' 

£2. It was a canon in the prosody of the Greeks and Ro- 
mans, that words of more than one syllable must have either an 
acute or a circumflex accent ; and that tlie other syllables, with- 
out an accent, were to be accounted grave: but if this be ao, 
what are we to think of those numerous monosyllables, and the 
final syllables of those dissyllables that we see marked with 
the grave accent, as Mi», wpo, <r«», ©loj, 'Avip, x. t. a. f " Why, 
'* these words," says Mr. Forster, " whatever Dr. Gaily may 
*^ conceive, had certainly their elevation on the last syllable:'' 
and this opinion pf Mr. Forster*s is supported by some of th^ 
most respectable authorities*"^ 



* The seeming impossibility of reconeilins; accent and quantity made Herman 
Vanderhardt, tlie author of a small treatise, entitled, *^ Arcamtm AecetUuum 
** Grtecorumi* consider the marks of Greek accentuation as referring not to syl- 
labic, but oratorial accent. But, as Mr. Forster observes, " if this snppositioq 
^ were trtte,we ibould not isect witb th« same word constantly accented in the 



CREEK AND LATtM ACCSST. 

1^ S3. With respect to the power of the accent in both the 
Greek and I^tin languages, nothing can be better established 
by die ancient grammarians than tliat the acute accent did not 
lengthen the sellable it fell upon; and that short syllables, re- 
maining short, had often the acute accent. Iliis op'uiioii has 
been irrefutably maintained by Mr. Forster,* and the author of 



" lane mBmiFr as we sec it at present. A word's oratorial aeceot will ti 
" according lo tbe geoeral sentiment of the passage whcieinit oecitra; but 
" aj'llabic accent will be invariably tlie same, iiidcpendciiC of its ceimcxion with 
" ether worda in Oie lamc sentence, except iu tbe ewe of enclitics and « 
" other." — Euag sn Accent and QuaMity, page £5. 

* Bat when Mr. Foreter eodeavours to explain how ttiii b to be done, be bai 

" Notwithstanding the rr1uc?tnnce of Vosaius, Mennlnius, and llioiiHands aflei 
"them, to admit the acute ai compatible withaahort time, if I could have thrnt 
" near me with a fiute in my hand, or rather with an organ before ns, T would 
•■ eo^^etoconvineethemof thecansiatencyof tbeaelwo. Iwnuld takeanjtwa 
" keys next to each other, one of which wotdd consequently gives sound lowee 
" than the other: snppose the words oii^t before us, or i{ivfa.y, both which 
" words Yossins would circni]iflexonthepenultimate,iiieieadoreiving an acute 
" the first, according to our present marks: I woold, conformably to these murks 
" just touch the higlier key for the initial ~, and take my linger off iiiimedhilcly 
" and then touch ilie lower key, on which I would dwell lunger than Idid on du 
" higher, and that would give me a grave with a long time ler tbe syllable t> 
" the Mme lower key 1 would just touch again, and instantly leave it, whicb 
" would give mc a grave with a short time for Ji : «.S.. Now il' tliis c 
" done on a wiud-instnnnent witliin the uarrowcompassof twonolcs, it may ba 
" dune by the orgaiu of human spuecb, which are of the nature of a wind^nstnu 
" meni, in ordinary pronunciation. For tlic sounds of our voice to common 
" speeeh difivr from those of such miisleal instruments, not in quality, but ia 
" arithmetical discrete qiiantitjr or number only, as hatb been observed before, 
*' and is conlinncd by the decisive judgement of that nice and discerning critia 
'• Dianysiusof Halicamassus. Heie l1ienis,lo demonstration, an acute tone ct 
, with a short lime, and a grave tone with a lung one." F. Mi, 343,. 

^Ihi* Imay add the (ibservaiion made by the ikiithor of the £vMy on tArAir^ 



t70 OBSEItVATIOKS ON T«B 

Observations on the Greek and Latin Prosodies; thongb ^ 
strenuously denied by Dr. Gaily,* Isaac Vbssius, and Hen* 
ninius ; and these last seem to have been persuaded of the inae^ 
parable concomitanqr of the acute accent and lov^ quantity, 
from the impossibility they supposed there was of sep^^ating 
diem in any language. But if we make our ears and not our 
eyes judges of quantity, can any thing be more palpable tfaan- 
the short quantity of the accented syllables of proselytey ano^ 
dt/ne, tribune J and inmate; and the Jong quantity of the final' 
syllables of tliese words? And when we pronounce the Greek 
and Latin words, c(paix>M', y^^/Zo, au^or, amdo, nothing can^ 
be more evident than the long quantity of the final vowel 



mofiy of Language, *^ Straage it F^cms, that the author of this passage should 
** mamtain an opinion so contrary to truth, so repugnant to his own purpose, so 
^ betied by daily and hourly experience,, as that the union of the acote tone, 
** with a short quantity, seldonr occius in English: pronnnciation, and is hanyy 
**• practicable by an EngUsli voice." And still more strange,.! niayadd, is it^ 
that these two authors should not see that the experiment,, which is called a de-^ 
monstration, has nothing to do with the point in qne^tion. Itregards toaes tbat 
rise or fall by peFceptibie intervals, and not sudi as rise or fell by sli^tes or im- 
perceptible <mes. Let it odcp be allowed that the Greeks and Romans song 
their huigoage, instead of speaking it, and then the acute or grave accent^ with: 
long or riiort quantity, are easily conceived ;. but it is- not about musical, but 
speaking tones tliat we inquire : and though the authority of Dionysios of Hali- 
camassus is cited for the nature of the speaking voice a^ distinct, in degree only 
and not in kind,irom singing, I boldly assert that tliifrisnot matter of authority ^ 
but of experiment, and tliat singing and speaking are as distinct as motion anil: 
rest. It is true some motion may be so slow as not to be perceived ; but then, 
it is to be considered as rest: as a curve may approach so near to a right 
line as not to be distinguishable fix>m it; but in these cases, where the -sensea 
and not the understanding are addressed, things are to be estimated for just 
what tlie senses value them at — ^De non apparentibns, et de non exiattntibitt^ 
€adem est ratio. 

* If the acute accent or stress, as Dr. Gaily calls itj made the short sylla-^ 
ble long, what becomes of the metre of verse? How will he tcan <^- Amiii^ 
M virumque cano?^ 



CREEK ANB LATIN AOCEKtI Wl3 

ipugh without Uie accent, and the short qusuitit)' of the iuitial and 
acceated syllable. 

24. As to tiie long quantity arising from the succetision of 
two consonants, which the ancients are uniform in asserting, u 
it did not mean that the preceding vowel was to lengthen its 
sound, as we should do by pronoimcing the a in scatter aa we do 
in skater, (one who skates) I have no conceptioii of wliat it 
meant;* for if it meant that only tlie time uf the syllable was 
prolonged, tlie vowel retaining the same sound, I must confess 
a» utter an inability of comprehending dib source of quantity in 
the Greek and Latin as in English. lianUh, banner, and banter, 
have to our ears the first syllable equally short: the same may be 
observed of senate, semiitary, sentence, and sentiment ; and if, ax 
an ingenious critirt- has asserted, tlie ancients prouounced both tha 
consonants in i-allidus, fallo, Bcc.^iat is finishing one / by sepa- 
rating the tongue firom the palat« before the otlier is begun, such 
a pronuuctatiou must necessarily augment the number of sylla- 
bles, nearly as if written caleUdus, J'alc/o, &c. and is tlierefore 
contrary to all the rules of ancient prosody ; nor would this 
pronunciation to our ears give the least length to the preceding. 

vowel, any more than the succeedii^ mute -does in sentetiee and 
tentiment. 



• If the daoblc namonauta imtunUly made a sjUuble long, I should lie glnd 
to know how there could be eieeptions to tliianilef How could Ammonius 
(ay, that theuroadsyllahle of kiiray^ci was long, when the word was used in 
one pitrticiilar leinp, and ihart in soother? And how canld Cicero taj, that 
the firal letter ol* inelytui wag sbort, uid the fint of insonus and ir^elix long, 
ifiwoiuccecding consoiiautj naturally lengthened the syllable? Dr. Fonier, 
indeed, altemptB la reconcile this conlraitiction, by obierving tiixt Cicero doca 
not lay, the Brat tyltablii of "inclylai is aliort, but the first letter; but It may 
be deniandtd, wliat is it lliat nukes the syllable long or short, but the length or 
•hoTloeH of the vowel > If the double cooBonaiits necessarily retard Ihi; sound 
of tbe vowel, Ibe second syllable oC xiTij-^a, and tlie tint of inelj/lus, ctiuld 
not |>Hsiibl; be pronounced short ; aiidpurticularly the latter word could not he 
«upraoouno«d, aiitlias theaocentunlhe lirBisylJiahle. Seeiect 16|intbeDeta 

1 Eaag upon the HanBony iff Lan^uofr, page ii9. 433. RoBnm, ITTS. 



fi72 OBSERVATIONS ON TVS 

25. When fiiese observations on the accent and quan^ty of 
the ancients are all put together, shall we wonder that the learn* 
'ed and ingenious author of Elements of Criticism* should go so 
far as to assert that the dactyls and spondees of hexameter verse, 
with respect to pronunciation, are merely ideal, not only with as, 
but that they were so with the ancients themselves i few, however, 
will adopt an opinion which will necessarily imply that the 
Greek and Latin critics were utterly ignorant of the nature of 
their own language : and every admirer of those excellent wri« 
ters will rather embrace any explanation of accent and quan- 
tity, than give up Dionysius of Halicarnassus, Cicero, Quin- 
tilian, and Longinus. Suppose then, as a last refuge, we were 
to try to read a Greek or Latin verse, both by accent and quan* 
tity in the manner they have prescribed, and see what such a 
trial will produce. 

' €6. By quantity, let us suppose the vowel lengthened to ex- 
press the long quantity; and by the acute accent, the rising ia-- 
flexion as explained above* 

Tityr^, tu patulae recubans sub tegmine. fagi, 
Sylvestrem tenui musam meditaris avena. 

Tltyre, tu patulae recubans sub tegmtne f agi, 

Sylvestrem tSiuii musam m^dlftarts llvena. 

Teetyre too patulee recubanes soob teegmine fagi, 
Seelveestreem tenui mioosame meditaris avena. 

MSan^n 6-eye-de The-ay Pea4ea-e-i-<lyo A-kiU^-o»e 
Ow Jom-m6n-een bee moo-re a-kay-ofes &il-ge 6th-ee-kee 



* BUmentM^CrHieiim, vol* Ih page 10$. Se« also the JElsn^ upm tht Bkn^. 



GREEK AND LATIN ACCENT. 273 

$7. Now there are but four possible ways of pronouncing 
these verses without going into a perfect song''^: one is, to pro'^ 
nounce. the accented syllable with the falling inflexion, and &e 
imaccented syllable . with the same inflexion in a lower tone, 
which is the way we pronounce our owji words when we give 
them the accent with the falling inflexion : the second is, to 
pronounce the accented syllable with the rising inflexion, and the 
unaccented syllables with the same inflexion in a lower tone, 
which we never hear in our own language : the third is, to pro- 
nounce the accented syllable with the falling inflexion, and the 
unaccented syllables with the rising, in a lower tone: and the 
fourth, to pronounce the accented syllable with the rising in- 
flexion, and' the unaccented with the falling, in a lower tone. 
None of these modes but the first and last do we ever hear in 
our own language : the second and third seem too diflicult to per* 
mit us to suppose that they could be the natural current of the 
human voice in any language. The first leaves' us no possible 
means of explaining the circumflex , but the last, by doing this, 
gives us the strongest reason to suppose that the Greek and 
Latin acute accent was the rising inflexion, and the grave accent 
the falling inflexion, in a lower tone. 



* This, I may be bold to say, is coming to the point at once, without hiding 
our ignorance, by supposing that the ancients had so^ie mysterious way of pro- 
nouncing which we are utterly incapable of conceiving. Mr. Sheridan tells 

I 

us, that, << the ancients did observe the distinction of accents by an elevatiou 
" and depression of voice ; but the manner in which they did it must remain 
^ for ever a secret te us ; for, with the living tongue, perished the tones also ; 
" which we in vain endeavour to sfek for in tUeir visible marks."— Lectures <m 
Elocution, 4to edition, page 39. — From these and similar observations in many of 
our writers, one would be tempted to imagine, that the organs of speaking in 
ancient Greece and Rome were totally different from those of the present race 
of men in Europe. 

T 



^74 OBSERVATIONiS ON THE 

28. But if the readefr were sufficiently acqusiifited tnthdlese 
inflexions of voice^ or could be present while I exemplified diem 
to him, I doubt not that he would immediately say, it was im- 
possible so monotonous a pronunciafion could be that of the 
Greeks and Romans * : but when we consider the monotony of 
the Scotch, Welsh, and Irish, why should we wonder that 
olher nations should be as monotonous? Let us view the 
Creek and Latin pronunciation on which side we will, we must, 
to be consistent with their own rules, feel them to be extremely 
monotonous. According to the laws of ancient prosody, every 
unaccented syllable must be lower than that which is accented ; 
and if so, a most disagreeable monotony must necessarily en- 
sue: for as every word in Latin, and almost every word in 
Greek, of more than one syllable, ended with the grave accent, 
that is, in a lower tone than the preceding syllables, almost every 
word in those languages ended with the same tone, let that tone 
have been what it would-f*. 

29* I am supported in this conjecture, notwithstanding all 

* Dr. Burney tells us, that Meibomius, the great and learned MeibominB, 
when prevailed upon at Stockholm to sing Greek strophes, set the whole conrt 
of Christina in a roar ; as Naud^ did in executing a Roman dance. And Sea- 
ligcr observes, that if the nice tonical pronunciation of the ancients could be 
expressed by a modern, it would be disagreeable to our ears. 

f This is certainly too general an assertion, if we consider the real prenna- 
ciatibn 6f the Greek lafiguage according to accent ; as it must be allowed that a 
great number of Greek words were accented vdth the acute or circumflex on 
ilie lust syllable ; but vtrhen we consider the modem pronunciation of Greek 
xvhich confounds it with the Latin, we shall not have occasion to recall the 
assertion. To which we may add, that those words in Greek that were cir- 
cuinflexed on the last syllable may very properly be said to end with the grave 
accent ; and that those which had a grave upon the final syllable altered the 
grave to an acute only when they were pronounced alone, when they came b^. 
fore an enclitic, or when they were at the end of the sentence. 



GREEK AND LATIN ACCENT- €75 

the fine diings* die abcieioitSy and many of the moderns^ say of 
Ihe variety and harmony of the Greek and Latin lai^ages^ by 
the definition which they give of the circumflex accent ; v?hich 
is, that it was a combination of the acute i^d grave upon the 
same syllable. This is so incomprehensible to modem ears, 
that scarcely any one but the atithor of the present Observations 
has attempted to explain it by experiment. It stands for nothing 
but long quantity in all our schools; and, contrary to tiie 
, clearest testimonies of antiquity, it has, by Dr. Gallyf and a 
late respectable writer on the Greek and Latin Prosodies, been 
explained away into nothing more than the acute accent. But 
if it means a raising and falling of the voice upon the same syl- 
lable, which is the definition the ancients uniformly give of 
it, it is just as easy to conceive as raising and ^ling the voice 
upon successive syllables ; or, in other words, as going from a 
lower tone to a higher upon one syllable, and from a higher to a 
lower upon the next : and this consideration leads me to con- 
jecture, that the acute accent of the ancients was really the rising 



* fl^e Grecian sage, (says Dr. Bumey,) according to Gravina, was at once 
a philosopher, a poet, and a mnsician. << In separating these characters/' says 
he, ** they have aU been weakened ; the system of philosophy has been con- 
" traeted ; ideas have failed in poetry, and force and energy in song. Truth no 
*' longer subsists among mankind : the philosopher speaks not at present through 
'* the medimn of poetry ; nor is poetry heard any more through the yehicle of 
*' meHody.'lr-" Now to^my apprehension," says Dr. Bumey, " the reverse of 
'< aU this is exactly true : for, by being separated, each of these professions ' 
" receives a degree of cultivation, which fortifies and rendersit more powerful, 
** f£ not more illustrious. The music of ancient philosophers, and the philo- 
^ sojj^hy of modem musicians, I, take to be pretty equal in excellence. Histwry 
^ Jwu^f y4>l. I. page 162.-— Here we see good sense and sound philosophy con* 
trastedwilh the blind admiradonand empty fk>arish of an overgrown tchool-boV 
coAcludhig his theme 

t DuaertatUm Mgainst Greek Accents, page 55. 

T 2 



276 OBSERVATIONS ON THE 

inflexion^ or upward slide of the voice ; for this being once Ap- 
posed, nothing is so easy as to demonstrate the circumflex in our 
own language; which^ without this clue, it will be impossible to 
do in the ancient languages ; and even with it, we .inust be s^to- 
nished they had but one cu-cumflex ; since it is just as easy to fall 
and raise the voice upon the same syllable as to raise and fall it*. 
SO. But our wonder at these peculiarities of the Gr^k 
and Latin languages will cease when we turn our thoughts t6 
the dramatic performances of the people who spoke these Ian- 



* To add to onr astonishment, that the Greek and Latm langna^es had bat 
4>ne circumflex, what can be more wonderful, than that among so many of the 
ancients who have written on the causes of eloquence, and who have descended 
to sudi trifling and childish observations upon the unportance of letters and syl- 
lables, we should not find a smgle author who has taken notice of the in|>Oit* 
ance of emphasi? upon a single word ? Our modem books of elocation ahmiiid 
with instances of the change produced in the dense of a sentence by changmg 
the place of the emphasis : but no such instance appears among the ancients. 
Not one poor Will you ride to town to day ! 

Our wonder will increase when we consider that the ancients frequentlymeiip 
tion tlie different meaning of a word as it was differently accented ; that is, at 
the acute or circumflex was placed upon one syllable or another ; bat they never 
hint that the sense of a sentence is altered by an emphasis being placed upon 
different icwds. The ambiguity arising from the same word's being differently 
accented is so happily exemplified by the author of .the Greek and Latin PlD- 
iodies, tliat I shall use his words. ^\ Alexander Aphrodiaienns illustrates this 
.<< species of sophism, by a well-chosen example of a law, in which the sense 
*^ depends entirely upon the accuracy of accentuation. 'EreU^et x^^ *^ ^«H^ 
** hifxSata la-rv. The word hifxwritty with the acute accent upon the antepenult, 
<< is the neuter nominative plural, in apposition with p^^uo-M. And the sense 
'' is, * If a courtezan wear golden trinkets, let -them (viz. her golden 
<< trinkets) be forfeited to the public use." But if the accent be ad- 
<< vaaced to the penult, the word, without any other change, be- 
<< comes the feminine ^nominative singular, and must be taken in appo- 
'<< sition withETdtga. And thus the sense will be^ < If a courtenm wear 
^ golden trinkets, let her become public properly.' This is a very notable io- 

<< stance 



GREEK AND LATIN ACCENT. 277 

^ages. Can aiiy thing astonish us more^ than that all their tra- 
gedies and comedies were set to music, and actually, accompanied 
by music^ instruments f How is our laughter, as well as out 
wonder, excited, when we are told that sometimes one actor ges- 
ticulated while anodier recited a speech, and that the greater ad- 
miration was bestowed upon the former! Nay, to raise the 
ridicule to the highest pitch, we are informed that actors in their 
speeches, and the chorus in their songs, accompanied their per- 
formances by dancing; that the actors wore masks lined with 
brass, to give an echoing sound to the voice, and that these 
masks were marked with one passion on one side, and with a 
contrary passion on the other ; and that the actor turned that 
side to the spectators which corresponded to the passion of 
the speech he was reciting. These extraordinary circumstances 
are not gathered from obscure passages of the ancients, picked 
up here and there,- but are brought to us by the general and 
united voice of all antiquity: and therefore, however surprising; 
or even ridiculous, they may seem, are undoubtedly tnie. 

3 1 . Perhaps it will be said, is it possible that those who have 
left us such proofs of tlieir good sense and exquisite taste in 
their writings, statues, medals, and seals, could be so absurd in 
their dramatic representations? The thing is wonderful, it 
may be answered ; but not more so than that tlicy should not 
have seen the use of stirrups in riding, of the polarity of the 
loadstone in sailing, and of several other modern discoveries, 



<' stance of the political importance of accents, of written accents, in the 

<< Greek langoage. For if this law had -been put in writing without any accent 

t' upon the word htfjUa-ut there would have been no means of deciding between 

** two constructions ; either of which, the words, in this state, urould equally 

<< have admitted: and it must have remained an mexplicable doubt, whether 

'< the legislator meant, that the poor woman should only forfeit her trinkets, or 

^ become a public slave.*' 

T 3 . 



273 OBSBRVATIONS OK THE 

which Mem t6 have stared tfaeth fiill in the imce ivitfaout their 
l^rceiykig it*. But is there any thing more common than to find 
not only individuals^ but a whole people^ who^ thou^ remark- 
ably excellent in some things^ are surprisbgly deficient in 
others i So true is the observation of Middleton, who^ speak- 
ing of those who have written on die pronunciation of the Oreek 
and Latin languages^ says: *' Ab illis vero scriptoribus etsi 
^ plurima ingeniose atque erudite disputata sint^ nonnulia 
*^ tamen deesse^ multa dubi^^ quaedani etiam faiso' posita ani- 



* We liave the strongest proof in the world that the ancient Greeks made 
nseionly of capital letters, that they were utterly ignorant of punctuation, and 
tiiat there was not the least space between words or sentences, but that there 
Was an equal continuation of letters, which the reader was obliged to decipher, 
without any assistance firom points or distances. Without the clearest evidence^ 
could we suppose, that, while composition had reached the perfection it had done 
In Greece, orthography was in a state of barbarity worthy of the Cape of 
Good Hope ? 

Can any thing give us a more ludicrous idea than the practice of the ancients 
, in sometimes splitting a word at the end of the line, and commencing tiie next 
line with the latter part of the word? This must have been nearly as ridicnlcKO 
§s the following English verses, in imitation of this absurd practice^ 

Pyrrhus, you tempt a danger high, 
lyhen you would steal from angry 1|- 
Oness her cubs, and soon shall fly 

inglorious. 

For know the Romans, yon shall find 
9y virtue more and generous kind- 
Ness, than by force or fortune blind, 

victorious. 

Notwithstanding the hackneyed epithet of Gothic barbarity applied to vers<! in 
rhyme, is it not wonderful that a species of versification, approved by Italy, 
France, and England, in their best periods of poetry, should never once have been 
tried by the GreeksandRomans?— that they should never have straggled, either 

by 



GREEK AND LATIN ACCENT. ft79 

'■» 

'^ m^verti; idqfie hac in causa accidisse^ quod in qseterb pie- 
^^ ris^u^ ^let^ ut mortalium nemini detur rem ipvenlsi^e simul 
" »t perfecisse/' De hat. Lit. Pronun. 

32. That singing a part in a tragedy should seem so unna- 
tural* to us, arises chiefly from our being so little accustomed 
to it. Singing in the pulpit seems to the full as extraordinary ; 



by chance, or for tLe sake of change, into so pleasing a jingle of sonnds? 
They who would write poems, and so lengthen or shorten the lines, as to form 
axes, wings, and altars, might, without any imputation on tlieir taste, have, now 
and then, condescended to rhyme. In short, that the ancients should never 
have slid into rhyme, is a circumstance which would never have heen believed, 
had it been possible to doubt it : and I fear it must be classed widi that long 
catalogue of nnaccountables, with which their prosody, their rhetoric, and 
their drama abound. 

* Perhaps our unwillingness to believe that the ancient dramas were set to 
music, arises from a very mistaken notion we have of their skill in that art. It 
is true we have not the same materials forjudging of their music as we have of 
their poetry and sculpture ; but their ignorance of counterpoint, and the po- 
verty of their instruments, sufficiently show what little progress tli6y had made 
in it. Tliose very few remains of their music which have reached us, confinn 
us in this coi^ecture ; and it is to the indefatigable pains of so good a scholar 
and so excellent a musician as Dr. Burncy, that we are indebted for an illus- 
tration of it. 

<' At the end of a Greek edition of the ^tronomical poet, Aratus, called Phae- 
<< nomena,'* says Dr. Bumey, *' and their Scholia, published at Oxford in 176S ; 
<< the anonymous editor, supposed to be Dr. John Fell, among several other 
** pieces^ has enriched the volume with three hynms, which he supposed to 
** have been written by a Greek poet called Dionysius ; of which the first is 
** addressed to the muse Calliope, the second to Apollo, and the third to Ne- 
'<* mesis ; and these hynms are accompanied with the notes of ancient music 
*< to which they used to be sung. 

<* I know not whether justice has been done to these melodies ; all I can say is, 
^ that ho pains have been spared to place them in the clearest and most tavourabU 
'* point of view : and y«t, with all the advantages of modem notes and modem 

T 4 ** measures^ 



280 OBSERVATIONS ON THE 

a)9d yet this song was so powerful abottt a century or two ag«, 
and later in Scotland^^ as to make mere speaking, thoQgh with 
the utmost energy, appear flat and bsipid. Let the human 



^' measures, if I had been told that they came from the Cherokees or the Hot- 
" tentbts, I should not have been surprised at their excellence. 

" I have tried them in every key and in every measure that tiie feet of the 
^' verses wou]d allow ; and as it has been the opinion of some, that the Greek 
^* scale and music should be read Hebrew-wise, I have even inverted the order 
" of the notes, but without being able to augment tlieir grace and elegance. 
" The most charitable supposition that can be admitted concerning them is, 
** that the Greek langu^e being itself accentuated and sonorous, wanted less 
« assistance from musical refinements than one that was moi'e harsh and rough ; 
*< and music being still a slave to poetry, and wholly governed by its feet, de- 
<< rived all its merit and effects from the excellence of the verse, and sweetness 
'< of the voice that sung, or rather recited it : for mellifluous and affecting 
" voices nature bestows from time to time on some gifted mortals in all the ha- 
^ bitable regions of the earth -, and even the natural effusions of these must 
« ever have been heard with delight. But as musiCf there needs no other proof 
^ of the poverty of ancient melody, than its being confined to long and short 
<< syllables. We have some airs of the most graceful and pleasing kind, which 
<< will suit no arrangement of syllables to be found in any poetical numbers, 
(^ ancient or modem, and which it is impossible to express by mere sylfaibles^ia 
^ any language with which I am at all acquainted." 

Dr. Bnmey's conjecture, that the Greek music was entirely subservient to 
verse, accounts for the little attention wluch was paid to it in a separate staCte ; 
it accounts for the effects witli which their music was accompanied, and for the 
total uselessness of counterpoint. Simple melody is the fittest music to accom- 
pany words, when we wish to understand what iS sung ; simple melody is t^e 
mnsie of the great bulk of mankind ; and simple melody is never undervalued, 
till the ear has been sufficiently disciplined to discover the hidden melody, . 
which is still essential to tlie mcst complicated and elaborate harmony. 

♦ Tlie Rev. Mr. Whitfield was a highly animated and energetic preacher, 
without the least tincture of that tope which is called canting. Wlien he wenjt 



/■ 



GREEK ANd LATIN ACCENT. 281 

voice be but in a ^e tone^ and let tbis time be intenselj im- 
passioned^ and it will infallibly^ as Milton expresses it, 

ic . take the piison'd soul, 

" And lap it in £lysiuni -. •/' 

33. What may tend to reconcile us still more to this dramatic 
music, is the sing-song manner, as it is called, of pronouncing 
tragedy, which very generally prevailed before the time of Mr, 
Garrick, and which now prevails among some classes of speakers, 
and is preferred by them to, what we call, the more natural 
manner. This drawling, undulating pronunciation, b what the 
actors generally burlesque by repeating the line^ 

Tum ti tum ti, turn ti tum ti tum ti: 

and though this mode of declamation is now so .much de- 
spised, it is highly probable that it was formerly held in esiXr 
mation*. 

34. Now, if we suppose this drawling pronunciation, which, 
though very sonorous, is precisely speakings and essentially dif- 
ferent from singing : if we suppose this to have been the con« 
rersation pronunciation of the Greeks and Romans, it may pos- 



to Scotland, where this tone was in high estimation, thongh his doctrine was in 
perfect unison with that of his aaditors, his simple and natural, though earnest 
manner of speaking, was looked upon at first as a great defect. He wanted, 
they said, the holy tone. 

* This cant, which, though disgustful now to all but mere rustics, on account 
of its being out of fashion, was very probably tlie favourite modulation in which 
heroic verses were recited by our ancestors. So fluctuating are the taste and 
practices of mankind ! but whether the power of language has received any ad- 
vantage from the change just mentioned (namely, pronouncing words in a more 
simple manner) will appear at least very doubtful, when we recollect tlie stories 
of its former triumphs, and the inherent charms of musical sounds. — The Art of 
i^lweriiig Wriitm Ltftgung^j page 7J. 



fB% OBSERVATIONS ON THE 

siMy tlurow sope light upon the manner in wh^b tfa^ pro- 
nounced by accent and quantity at the same time : for tboi^ 
we can sufficiently conceive that in common speaking in our own 
language we can make the accented syllable shorty and the unac- 
cented syllable long, as in the words qua^^ V^lfyf elbow ^ inr 
mate^&ic. ;-yet in the drawling pronunciation we have been speak- 
ing of, the long miaccented vowels in these words are made much 
longer, and consequently more perceptible. 

35. But, if the accent of our language is so different from 
^t of the Greek and Latin, our pronunciation must necessarily 
be very different likewise. The acute accent of the ancients 
being always higher than either the preceding or succeeding syl- 
lables, and our accent, though always higher than die preceding, 
being sometimes low0r than the succeeding syllables, (see sect, vii) 
there must certainly be a wide difference between our pronunci- 
ation and theirs. Let us, however, explain the Greek and Latin 
accent as we will, — ^let it be by singings drawling, or common 
speaking, — it will be impossible to tell how a monotony could be 
avoided, when almo^ every word ot more than one syllable in 
these languages must neces^rily have ended in &e same tone, or^ 
if you will, with the same grave accent*. 

36. After all, that the Greeks and Romans, in explaining the 
causes of metrical and prosaic harmony, should sometimes de- 
scend to such minute particulars^ as appear to us trifling and 



* Where was all .that endless variety with which the moderns puff off the 
Greek language, when it had but one circumflex? The human voice is just as 
capable of falling and rising upon the same syllable as rising and falling ; and 
why so palpable a combination of fonnds as the former should be utterly 
unknown to the Greeks and Latins, can be resolved into nothing but (hprresco 
referens) their ignorance of the principles of hnmau speech. 

t Nee llli (Demostheni) turpe videbatur vel optimis relictis magistris ad canes 
se conferre, et ab illis ^ literae vim et naturam petere, illorumque in sonando, 
quod satis esset, moi«m imitari. — Ad, Miktr, dfi vet, et reel, J^ron, Lvng. GrtectBy 

page 14. 

It 



GBBEK A^D LA^IN ACCENT. $8^ 

imagmary^ and at the same time nj^Iect things which fippear t^, 
us so essential ; — that diey should be so dark^ and sometimes so 
contradictory in their account of accent and quantity, ^ to 
furnish opposite systems among the mo(}ems, with ample quota- 
tions in favour of each : — b thb more wonderful than that Mr. 
Sheridan,* who was so good an actor, and who had spent so 
much time in studying and writiqg on elocution, should sajr 
Aat accent was only a louder pronunciation of the accented syU 
lable, and not a higher ? But as this same Mr. Sheridan, in his 
jfri of Reading, has excellently observed, that our perception of 



It is an observation of Chambers, author of the Cyclopaedia, that nonsense 
bounds worse in the En^^h than in any other language: let us try the experiment 
by traifiiating the above passage. — l^or did Demosthenes think it beloV^ him to 
leave the company of the most respectable people of Athens, and go to the 
dogs, in order to learn from them the nature of the letter r, and, by observmg 
the sound they gave it, to imitate, as mnch as vvas necessary, their manner of 
pronouncing it. 

What encomiums do we meet with in Cicero, of the delicacy of the ears even 
of the common people ot Rome; who, if an actor on the stage made the least 
error in accent or quantity, were immediately sensible of it, and yrould express 
their disapprobation* But I am apt to think, that an English actor, who should 
pronounce thedtre^ Mn&tor^ or emquSstj with the accent on the second syUaUe> 
would not escape better than the Roman. 

* ** The Scotchman utters the first syllable of hattU, borrow^ habit, in the 
<< middle tone, dwtllmg on the vowel ; and the second with a sudden elevation 
<^ of the voice, and short: as bd4Uy bau-r6y ha-bit The Englishman utters both 
<< syllables, vrithout any perceptible change of tone, and in equal tune, as baftle, 
*< bor'roWf hab'4t."—Art <^ Reading, page 77.— The smallest degree of attention 
might have taught Mr. Sheridan, that though this is the prevailing, it is not the 
invariable, pronunciation of a Scotchman : and that this elevation of voice, 
tiiough more perceptible in a Scotchman from his drawling out his tones, is no 
less real in an Englishman, vrho pronounces tiiem qmcker, and uses theia less fre- 
quentiy -, that is, he mixes the downvirard inflexion with ^em, which pnMhices 
a variety. But these two inflexions of voice Mr. Sheridan was an nttmr stranger 
19**— fte^ Elimentf rf Elocution, part II, page 18S, 



284 OBSERVATIONS ON TRB 

• • • • iff * . 

Latin quantity is imaginary, and arises not from die ear, but oidy 
from association, like spellii^ ^ so it may be observed, that the 
confusion and obscurity which reign among all our writers on 
accent and quantity seem to arise ^ from an ideal perception of 
long quantity produced by double consonants ; from confounding 
stress and quantity, which are so totally different ; and from mis- 
taking loud for high, and soft for low, contrary to the clearest 
definitions of each*. 

37* But till the human voice, which is the same in all ages 
and nations, is more studied and better understood, and till a 



* Nothing is more fallacious than that perception we seem to faare of tht 
sound of words being expressive of the ideasy and becoming, as Pope calls it» 
wn ec&9 to the seme. This coincidence, as Dr. Jojmson observes in one of his 
.Kamblers, seldom exists any where but in the imagination of the reader. 
Dryden, who often wrote as carelessly as he thought, aud often thought as care« 
lessly as he lived, began a commendation of the sweetness and smoothntes of 
two lines of Denham in praise of the Thames 

^ Though deep yet clear, though gentle yet not dull ; 
<< Strong without rage, without overflowing full.'* 

and this commendation of Dryden's has been echoe^ by all subsequent writers, 
who have taken it for granted, that there is a flow in the lines sunilar to that of 
the object described ; while the least attention to those stops, so necessary on 
the accented and antithetic words, will soon convince ud, that, however expres- 
sive the lines may be, they are as rugged and as littie musical as almost any m 
the language. 

A celebrated critic observes—" I am iq)t to think the harmony of the verse 
" was a secret to Mr. Dryden, since it is evident he was not acquainted with 
" the csesural stops, by which all numbers are harmonised. Dr. Bentiey has ob- 
<< served, the beauty of the second verse consists in the ktu8 that sounds on the 
" first sylkble of the verse, which, in English heroics,' should sound on the 
=.« second: for this verse is derived from the Trimeter lambie, Brachycatalectic:' 
— Mtmictaring's Stichologyy page 71. 

When I read such profound observations in such learned tenns, it brings t^ 
my mind the Mock Doctor in the fkrce, who shines away to the illiterate knight» 
by repeating Propria qua maribus, &c., and makes him most, pathetically 
exclaim — OA, why did I neglect my ttudies ? 



GREEK AND LATIN ACCENT. ^85 

notation of speaking sounds is adopted^ I despair of conveying 
my ideas of tins subject with sufficient cleamesis upon paper. I 
have^ however^ marked such an outline as may 1;>e easily filled up 
by those who study speaking with half the attention they must 
do music. From an entire conviction that the ancients had a no- 
tation of speaking sounds^ and from the actual experience of 
having formed one myself, I think I can foresee that some 
future philosophical inquirer, with more learning, more leisure, 
and more credit with the world than I have, will be able to un- 
ravel this mystery in letters, which has so long been the oppro^ 
brium et crux grammatkorum^ the reproach and torment of 
grammarians. 



THE END. 



Books 



Jffipks by lh$ same Author, 

Pnaled for i. J^hnon,, J. Vaiker^ WUkie aikl Rolmisony G. Robinson, vA 

C^dellandDavies. 

I. 

A CRITICAL PRONOUNCING DICTIONARY 

AND 

EXPOSITOR OF THE ENGUSH LANGUAGE: 

In which the Meaning of every Word is explained, the Sound of every Syllable 
is clearly 8ho\ni ; and where Words are subject to different Pronunciations, the 
Authorities of our best Pronouncing Dictionaries are fully exhibited, the VLem* 
sons for each are at large displayed, and the preferable Pronunciation is pointed 
out* 

TO WHICH ARE PREFIXED, 

PRINCIPLES OF ENGLISH PRONUNCIATION : 

In which the Sounds of Letters, Syllables, uid Words, are critically investi- 
gated, and systematically arranged ; the Influence of the Greek and Latin 
Accent and Quantity, on the Accent and Quantity of the English, is tho- 
roughly examined and clearly defined ; and the Analogies of the Language are 
so fully shown as to lay the Foundation of a consistent and rational Pronuncia- 
tion. Likewise, Rules to be observed by the Natives of Scotiand, Ireland;^ 
and London, for avoiding their several Peculiarities. 

TO WHICH ARE ADDED, 

DIRECTIONS TO FOREIGNERS, 

For acquiring a Knowledge of the Use of this Dictionary. The Whole inter* 
spersed with Observations, Etymological, Critical, and Granunatical. 

'< Quare si fieri potest, et verba omnia, et vox, hujus alumnum urbb oleant ; 
'< ut oratio Romana plene videatur, non civitate donata." — Quintilian, 

Tlie Fourth Edition, with considerable Improvements and large Additions. 
In One Volume Quarto. Price 1^ ll«. 6<l. Boards.